FREE delivery: Dec 13 - 22
Usually ships within 6 to 10 days.
As an alternative, the Kindle eBook is available now and can be read on any device with the free Kindle app. Want to listen? Try Audible.
$$9.00 () Includes selected options. Includes initial monthly payment and selected options. Details
Price
Subtotal
$$9.00
Subtotal
Initial payment breakdown
Shipping cost, delivery date, and order total (including tax) shown at checkout.
Your transaction is secure
We work hard to protect your security and privacy. Our payment security system encrypts your information during transmission. We don’t share your credit card details with third-party sellers, and we don’t sell your information to others. Learn more
Ships from
Book Depository US
Sold by
Ships from
Book Depository US
Return policy: Returnable until Jan 31, 2022
For the 2021 holiday season, returnable items purchased between October 1 and December 31 can be returned until January 31, 2022. You may receive a partial or no refund on used, damaged or materially different returns.
$3.96 delivery: Dec 6 - 13
Fastest delivery: Dec 3 - 8
Used: Acceptable | Details
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: A used book that may have some cosmetic wear (i.e. shelf-wear, slightly torn or missing dust jacket, dented corner, pages may include limited notes and highlighting)
<Embed>
Loading your book clubs
There was a problem loading your book clubs. Please try again.
Not in a club? Learn more
Amazon book clubs early access

Join or create book clubs

Choose books together

Track your books
Bring your club to Amazon Book Clubs, start a new book club and invite your friends to join, or find a club that’s right for you for free.

Download the free Kindle app and start reading Kindle books instantly on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required. Learn more

Read instantly on your browser with Kindle Cloud Reader.

Using your mobile phone camera - scan the code below and download the Kindle app.

QR code to download the Kindle App

Enter your mobile phone or email address

Processing your request...

By pressing "Send link," you agree to Amazon's Conditions of Use.

You consent to receive an automated text message from or on behalf of Amazon about the Kindle App at your mobile number above. Consent is not a condition of any purchase. Message & data rates may apply.

Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

Follow the Authors

See all
Something went wrong. Please try your request again later.


Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (Tor Classics) Mass Market Paperback – Unabridged, June 15, 1992

4.5 out of 5 stars 11,312 ratings

Price
New from Used from
Kindle
Mass Market Paperback, Unabridged
$9.00
$9.00 $1.45

Enhance your purchase


Inspire a love of reading with Amazon Book Box for Kids
Discover delightful children's books with Amazon Book Box, a subscription that delivers new books every 1, 2, or 3 months — new Amazon Book Box Prime customers receive 15% off your first box. Learn more.

Frequently bought together

  • Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (Tor Classics)
  • +
  • Story of the World, Vol. 4 Revised Edition: History for the Classical Child: The Modern Age (Story of the World, 4)
  • +
  • Knock at a Star: A Child's Introduction to Poetry
Total price:
To see our price, add these items to your cart.
Some of these items ship sooner than the others.
Choose items to buy together.

Special offers and product promotions

  • Create your FREE Amazon Business account to save up to 10% with Business-only prices and free shipping.

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (1832-98), a.k.a. Lewis Carroll, was a lecturer in Mathematics at Oxford University when he wrote Alice in Wonderland (1865) and Through the Looking-Glass (1871).

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

I

Down the Rabbit Hole


Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures or conversations in it, “and what is the use of a book,“ thought Alice, “without pictures or conversations?”
So he was considering in her own mind (as well as she could, for the hot day made feel very sleepy and stupid), whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies, when suddenly a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran close by her.
There was nothing so veryremarkable in that; nor did Alice think it so verymuch out of the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself “Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be too late!” (When she thought it over afterwards, it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural); but, when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its waistcoat-pocket, and looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat-pocket, or a watch to take out of it, burning with curiosity, she ran across the field after it, and was just in time to see it pop down a large rabbit-hole under the hedge.
In another moment down went Alice after it, never once considering how in the world she was to get out again.
The rabbit-hole went straight on like a tunnel for some way, and then dipped suddenly down, so suddenly that Alice had not a moment to think about stopping herself before she found herself falling down what seemed to be a very deep well.
Either the well was very deep, or she fell very slowly, for she had plenty of time as she went down to look about her, and to wonder what was going to happen next. First, she tried to look down and make out what she was coming to, but it was too dark to see anything: then she looked at the sides of the well, and noticed that they were filled with cupboards and book-shelves: here and there she saw maps and pictures hung upon pegs. She took down a jar from one of the shelves as she passed: it was labeled “ORANGE MARMALADE,“ but to her great disappointment it was empty: she did not like to drop the jar, for fear of killing somebody underneath, so managed to put into one of the cupboards as she fell past it.
“Well!” thought Alice to herself. “After such a fall as this, I shall think nothing of tumbling down-stairs! How brave they’ll all think me at home! Why, I wouldn’t say anything about it, even I fell off the top of the house!” (Which was very likely true)
Down, down, down. Would the fall nevercome to an end? “I wonder how many miles I’ve fallen by this time?” she said aloud. “I must be getting somewhere near the centre of the earth. Let me see: that would be four thousand miles down, I think--”(for, you see, Alice had learnt several things of this sort in her lessons in the school-room, and though this was not a verygood opportunity for showing off her knowledge, as there was no one to listen to her, still it was good practice to say it over) “--yes, that’s about the right distance--but then I wonder what Latitude or Longitude I’ve got to?” (Alice had not the slightest idea what Latitude was or Longitude either, but she thought they were nice grand words to say.)
Presently she began again. “I wonder if I shall fall right throughthe earth! How funny it’ll seem to come out among the people that walk with their heads downwards! The antipathies, I think--” (she was rather glad there wasno one listening, this time, as it didn’t sound at all the right word) “--but I shall have to ask them what the name of the country is, you know. Please Ma’m, is this New Zealand? Or Australia?” (and she tried to curtsey as she spoke--fancy, curtseyingas you’re falling through the air! Do you think you could manage it?) “And what an ignorant little girl she’ll think me for asking! No, it’ll never do to ask: Perhaps I shall see it written up somewhere.”
Down, down, down. There was nothing else to do, so Alice soon began talking again. “Dinah’ll miss me very much to-night, I should think!” (Dinah was the cat.) “I hope they’ll remember her saucer of milk at tea-time. Dinah, my dear! I wish you were down here with me! There are no mice in the air, I’m afraid, but you might catch a bat, and that’s very like a mouse, you know. But do cats eat bats, I wonder?” And here Alice began to get rather sleepy, and went on saying to herself, in a dreamy sort of way, “Do bats eat cats?” for, you see, as she couldn’t answer either question, it didn’t much matter which way she put it. She felt that she was dozing off, and had just begun to dream that she was walking hand in hand with Dinah, and was saying to her, very earnestly, “Now, Dinah , tell me the truth: did you ever eat a bat?” when suddenly, thump! thump! down she came upon a heap of sticks and dry leaves, and fall was over.
Alice was not a bit hurt, and she jumped up on to her feet in a moment: she looked up, but it was all dark overhead; before her was another long passage, and the White Rabbit was still in sight, hurrying down it. There was not a moment to be lost: away went Alice like the wind, and was just in time to hear it say, as it turned a corner, “Oh my ears and whiskers, how late it’s getting!” She was close behind it when she turned the corner, but the Rabbit was no longer to seen: she found herself in a long, low hall, which was lit up by a row of lamps hanging from the roof.
There were doors all around the hall, but they were all locked; and when Alice had been all the way down one side and up the other, trying every door, she walked sadly down the middle, wondering how she was ever to get out again.
Suddenly she came upon a little three-legged table, all made of solid glass; there was nothing on it but a tiny golden key, and Alice’s first idea was that this might belong to one of the doors of the hall; but, alas! either the locks were too large, or the key was too small, but at any rate it would not open any of them. However, on the second time round, she came upon a low curtain she had not noticed before, and behind it was a little door about fifteen inches high: she tried the little golden key in the lock, and to her great delight it fitted!
Alice opened the door and found that it led into a small passage, not much larger than the rat-hole: she knelt down and looked along the passage into the loveliest garden you ever saw. How she longed to get out of that dark hall, and wander about among those beds of bright flowers and those cool fountains, but she could not even get her head through the doorway; “and even if my head wouldgo through,“ thought poor Alice, “it would be of very little use without my shoulders. Oh, how I wish I could shut up like a telescope! I think I could, if I only knew how to begin.” For, you see, so many out-of-the-way thinks had happened lately that Alice had begun to think that very few things indeed were really impossible.
There seemed to be no use in waiting by the little door, so she went back to the table, half hoping she might find another key on it, or at any rate a book of rules for shutting people up like telescopes: this time she found a little bottle on it (“which certainly was not here before,“ said Alice), and tied around the neck of the bottle was a paper label, with the words “DRINK ME” beautifully printed on it in large letters
It was all very well to say “Drink me,“ but the wise little Alice was not going to do thatin a hurry. “No, I’ll look first,“ she said, “and see whether it’s marked ‘poison‘ or not” for she had read several nice little stories about children who had got burnt, and eaten up by wild beasts, and other unpleasant things, all because they wouldnot remember the simple rules their friends had taught them: such as, that a red-hot poker will burn you if you hold it too long; and that, if you cut your finger verydeeply with a knife, it usually bleeds; and she had never forgotten that, if you drink much from a bottle marked “poison,“ it is almost certain to disagree with you, sooner or later.
However, this bottle was notmarked “poison,“ so Alice ventures to taste it, and finding it very nice (it had, in fact, a sort of mixed flavour of cherry-tart, custard, pineapple, roast turkey, toffy, and hot buttered toast), she very soon finished it off.
* * *
“What a curious feeling!” said Alice. “I must be shutting up like a telescope!”
And so it was indeed: she was now only ten inches high, and her face brightened up at the thought that she was now the right size for going through the little door into that lovely garden. First, however, she waited for a few minutes to see if she was going to shrink any further: she felt a little nervous about this; “for it might end, you know,“ said Alice to herself, “in my going out altogether, like a candle. I wonder what I should be like then?” And she tried to fancy what the flame of a candle looks like after the candle is blown out, for she could not remember ever having seen such a thing.
After a while, finding that nothing more happened, she decided on going into the garden at once; but, alas for poor Alice! when she got to the door, she found she had forgotten the little golden key, and when she went back to the table for it, she found she could not possibly reach it: She could see it qui...

Product details

  • Publisher ‏ : ‎ Aerie (June 15, 1992)
  • Language ‏ : ‎ English
  • Mass Market Paperback ‏ : ‎ 128 pages
  • ISBN-10 ‏ : ‎ 0812504186
  • ISBN-13 ‏ : ‎ 978-0812504187
  • Lexile measure ‏ : ‎ 880
  • Item Weight ‏ : ‎ 3.17 ounces
  • Dimensions ‏ : ‎ 4.2 x 0.39 x 6.79 inches
  • Customer Reviews:
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,312 ratings

Audible Holiday Deal
Join Audible Premium Plus for 60% off. Only $5.95 a month for the first 3 months. Get this deal

About the author

Follow authors to get new release updates, plus improved recommendations.
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Lewis Carroll was born on 27 January 1832. He studied at Christ Church, Oxford and went on to become a mathematics lecturer there from 1855 to 1881. Lewis Carroll's most famous works are Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (published in 1865) and the sequel Alice Through the Looking-Glass, which contains the classic nonsense poem The Jabberwocky (published in 1872).

Customer reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
4.5 out of 5
11,312 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Reviewed in the United States on March 15, 2018
Verified Purchase
68 people found this helpful
Report abuse
Reviewed in the United States on December 7, 2019
Verified Purchase
11 people found this helpful
Report abuse
Reviewed in the United States on January 16, 2017
Verified Purchase
29 people found this helpful
Report abuse
Reviewed in the United States on August 27, 2017
Verified Purchase
14 people found this helpful
Report abuse

Top reviews from other countries

StephenDS
5.0 out of 5 stars A must read for everyone
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 24, 2019
Verified Purchase
35 people found this helpful
Report abuse
M. Dowden
5.0 out of 5 stars Always Great Fun
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 26, 2020
Verified Purchase
Customer image
5.0 out of 5 stars Always Great Fun
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 26, 2020
As so many reviews on this site end up getting cross-posted I should stress that this review is for the Amazon Classics Edition of this book, which has the original illustrations, with those wonderful pictures by John Tenniel, and which have influenced all other illustrators of the book since. First published in 1865 of course Lewis Carroll was the pseudonym of Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, who along with his novels and poems also wrote mathematical books, and invented and created things.

Still immensely popular and inspiring many others in the arts (not only with novelists) so this is quite possibly the world’s most famous children’s book and is always something worth introducing the younger members of your family to. Of course though, this book is still great for us older readers, as it not only brings back a piece of nostalgia but also, we can perhaps appreciate even more so the word games and other puns here. Because over the years there have been a number of other illustrators doing the artwork for different editions of this, and because our concerns and priorities have also changed so at times it is perhaps easy to miss the more symbolic things here, which show us a parody of life in the Victorian era. As the author was a mathematician so we can see that he alludes to this in places where he is scathing of the new mathematics that were starting to appear, and which would ultimately lead to new advances such as eventually quantum physics.

And so we read of here when Alice first went down the rabbit hole following the white rabbit who is late for an appointment. Just the beginning of her weird and wonderful adventure where we meet the Mad Hatter, the Red Queen, the Cheshire Cat and many other characters. Always entertaining and definitely fun this is a book that was a massive hit when it first came out, has never been out of print, and is an essential novel for any family library. To be honest there are not many books that you read as a child and can still remember many years later, showing the skill of the author here, as well as incorporating artwork, after all we are told to just look at the picture if we do not know what a gryphon is.
Images in this review
Customer image Customer image Customer image Customer image
Customer imageCustomer imageCustomer imageCustomer image
11 people found this helpful
Report abuse
Tobias
4.0 out of 5 stars Why is a raven like a writing-desk?
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 21, 2020
Verified Purchase
6 people found this helpful
Report abuse
Ross
3.0 out of 5 stars Er ... What?!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 15, 2020
Verified Purchase
7 people found this helpful
Report abuse
Kindleworm Dot Com
4.0 out of 5 stars I found a great prequel
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 29, 2019
Verified Purchase
3 people found this helpful
Report abuse