Buffy The Vampire Slayer

 (1,342)
8.31999X-RayTV-14
Buffy returns from the big city to find her friends have been battling the forces of evil without her. As she struggles to regain her mother's and her friends' trust, a new slayer named Faith arrives in town, quickly winning over all of Buffy's friends. But Faith's arrival is just the beginning of new forces Buffy must face. For a few nights later she encounters Angel, who has somehow returned, feral and violent from the hellish demon dimension where Buffy had sent him. But the real demon Buffy must ultimately face is already on this side of the portal, preparing a special graduation day surprise for Sunnydale High.
Starring
Sarah Michelle GellarNicholas BrendonAlyson Hannigan
Genres
Science FictionHorrorDramaFantasyRomanceAction
Subtitles
English [CC]
Audio languages
English

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  1. 1. Anne
    September 28, 1998
    45min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    Now living in the big city, Buffy helps a woman whose boyfriend has mysteriously disappeared, while back in Sunnydale her friends battle the forces of evil on their own.
  2. 2. Dead Man's Party
    October 5, 1998
    45min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    A Nigernian mask that Buffy's mother has acquired from the gallery has the unique power of resurrecting the dead.
  3. 3. Faith, Hope & Trick
    October 12, 1998
    45min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC], Español
    Audio languages
    English
    A charismatic Slayer named Faith shows up in Sunnydale and quickly wins over Buffy's mother and all of Buffy's friends.
  4. 4. Beauty And The Beasts
    October 19, 1998
    45min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    Buffy's fear that Oz could have killed a student during a full moon is compounded when she runs into Angel, violent and feral, during her nightly patrol.
  5. 5. Homecoming
    November 2, 1998
    45min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    As Buffy and Cordelia vie for the Homecoming Queen title they are targeted by a group of killers preparing for "SlayerFest '98."
  6. 6. Band Candy
    November 9, 1998
    44min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    Sunnydale's adult population begins acting like immature teenagers after eating candy bars being sold to finance new high school band uniforms.
  7. 7. Revelations
    November 16, 1998
    45min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    With help from Faith's new Watcher, Buffy tries to destroy the legendary Glove of Myhnegon before it falls into the hands of the demon Lagos.
  8. 8. Lovers Walk
    November 23, 1998
    45min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    Spike returns to Sunnydale and kidnaps Willow so she can create a magic spell that will make Drusilla love him once more.
  9. 9. The Wish
    December 7, 1998
    45min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    After Cordelia tells her new friend Anya that she wishes Buffy had never come to Sunnydale, she suddenly finds herself in a reality where vampires control the town.
  10. 10. Amends
    December 14, 1998
    45min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    As the Christmas holiday approaches, Angel is tormented by visions of his past victims, including Jenny Calendar, who want him to kill Buffy.
  11. 11. Gingerbread
    January 11, 1999
    44min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    After Buffy's mother discovers two dead children marked with a symbol linked to the occult, she begins a campaign to rid Sunnydale of witches.
  12. 12. Helpless
    January 18, 1999
    45min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC], Español
    Audio languages
    English
    As Buffy's eighteenth birthday approaches she loses her Slayer powers just as she must go up against a crazed vampire who has kidnapped her mother.
  13. 13. The Zeppo
    January 25, 1999
    44min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC], Español
    Audio languages
    English
    While the gang battles creatures from the Hellmouth, Xander has his own adventure when he encounters a group of reanimated corpses out to blow up the high school.
  14. 14. Bad Girls
    February 8, 1999
    45min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC], Español
    Audio languages
    English
    When Buffy's new Watcher, Wesley Wyndham-Pryce, arrives, Buffy takes off with Faith on a rebellious rampage that ends with the staking of the Deputy Mayor.
  15. 15. Consequences
    February 15, 1999
    44min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC], Español
    Audio languages
    English
    As detectives investigate the death of Deputy Mayor Finch, Faith's continued denial of any wrongdoing convinces Angel he must help her see the error of her ways.
  16. 16. Doppelgangland
    February 22, 1999
    45min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC], Español
    Audio languages
    English
    While casting a magic spell to help Anya regain her powers, Willow and Anya inadvertently summon Willow's evil twin, a vampire, from an alternate universe.
  17. 17. Enemies
    March 15, 1999
    45min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC], Español
    Audio languages
    English
    With the help of the Books of Ascension, Faith and the Mayor plot to steal Angel's soul then get him to kill that other Slayer - Buffy
  18. 18. Earshot
    September 27, 1999
    45min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC], Español
    Audio languages
    English
    After slaying a telepathic demon, Buffy is bombarded with the thoughts of everyone around her - including one student who appears to be planning mass murder.
  19. 19. Choices
    May 3, 1999
    44min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC], Español
    Audio languages
    English
    The Mayor imprisons Willow after Buffy and Angel steal a box containing demonic energy which the Mayor needs for his Ascension Day.
  20. 20. The Prom
    May 10, 1999
    45min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC], Español
    Audio languages
    English
    Buffy battles three fearsome hell-hounds which another classmate has programmed to attack students during Sunnydale High's senior prom.
  21. 21. Graduation Day, Part One
    May 17, 1999
    45min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC], Español
    Audio languages
    English
    To distract Buffy and keep her from interfering with the Mayor's Ascension, Faith shoots Angel with an arrow whose poison can only be cured by the blood of a Slayer.
  22. 22. Graduation Day, Part Two
    July 12, 1999
    45min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC], Español
    Audio languages
    English
    Buffy, her friends, and all the students of Sunnydale High prepare to face off against the Mayor and his hoard of vampires in a seemingly hopeless battle to save their town.

More details

Directors
Joss WhedonJames A. ContnerDavid SolomonDavid GrossmanMichael GershmanBruce Seth GreenNick MarckJames Whitmore Jr.David GreenwaltDavid Semel
Season year
1999
Network
FOX
Content advisory
Frightening scenesalcohol usefoul languagesexual contentviolence
Purchase rights
Stream instantly Details
Format
Prime Video (streaming online video)
Devices
Available to watch on supported devices

Other formats

Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars

1342 global ratings

  1. 86% of reviews have 5 stars
  2. 8% of reviews have 4 stars
  3. 3% of reviews have 3 stars
  4. 0% of reviews have 2 stars
  5. 3% of reviews have 1 stars
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Top reviews from the United States

Kindle CustomerReviewed in the United States on August 17, 2020
1.0 out of 5 stars
Love Buffy. Big fan but no actor dialog sound in Season 3 Episode 1 only background and music
Verified purchase
Season 3 Episode 1 had background sound only. No actor voices can be heard. The english subtitles come up so you can read your way through the episode but I’d like to know how it’s possible on a non prorated video you are selling as an authorized copy where I’m paying for the right to view it that this could happen.
I want a refund for this episode and to have you check out the problem and replace it with one that has sound with dialog not just background sounds and music. The intro has full sound but that’s because it gets pasted in to every episode.
Please replace.
7 people found this helpful
EllieReviewed in the United States on April 17, 2016
5.0 out of 5 stars
This set is great.
Verified purchase
I received this item quickly and it was packaged well with no damage to it or the container.
I'm a huge, huge, huge Buffy the Vampire Slayer fan. As in, when I'm not feeling good or down in the dumps, my husband knows to just put Buffy on and leave me to wallow. I'll eventually emerge feeling much better.
I'm not sure what happened to the VHS tapes I used to have, but they've managed to go missing long ago. Not that it would matter, since they're obsolete. I had always diverted back to Netflix whenever I wanted to watch my favorite show. However, Netflix has a nasty habit of just randomly dropping a title. Because of this, I'm slowly collecting the DVD sets.
I'll eventually buy one of the special edition box sets, but, for now, I'm enjoying these slim sets that I'm slowly picking up season by season. I like them because they take up little room and fit nicely on my shelf with our other movies and games.
Disclaimer: This should be an Amazon verified purchase. I paid full listing price and NOT receive this product free or deeply discounted. However, my review is still honest and unbiased. If you found this review to be helpful, I'd appreciate if you would mark it as such. Thanks!
11 people found this helpful
tylerReviewed in the United States on August 14, 2020
1.0 out of 5 stars
Sucks
Verified purchase
You can’t hear the voices. It’s like they have been digitally removed. It’s only the background noise. How do I get my money back!!
8 people found this helpful
Lawrance BernaboReviewed in the United States on January 1, 2003
5.0 out of 5 stars
Why Season Three of "BtVS" remains the series' best season
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Joss Whedon solved a major problem in Season Two of "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" in terms of how he resolved the tortured love of Buffy and Angel. Many a good television series went down the tubes because one the sexual tension between the two lovers was consummated, there was nowhere to go but down (classic case in point: Dave and Maddie on "Moonlight"). However, Whedon's masterstroke was that after Angel gave Buffy her birthday present, their relationship went down like no other relationship we had ever seen (not even Sid and Nancy) as Angel turned into Angelus. The season finale, "Becoming: Part II," is still one of the 10 best television episodes I have ever seen. The new problem facing Joss Whedon was: How do you top this in Season Three?
In one sense he does not. "Becoming" remains the Mt. Everest of the series, a height that can never be scaled again, no matter how many times Buffy's gift of "death" plays to her advantage. However, what makes Season Three better than Season Two is not that the top is higher, but rather than this is also true of the bottom. Pick the worst episode from Season Three (my choice is the obvious pick, "Beauty and the Beasts") and it is still better than the worst of the first two seasons (e.g., "Teacher's Pet," "Go Fish"). Look at all 22 episodes and you should end up being convinced that this was clearly the show's best season.
By now there is clearly an extremely effective pattern to a season of "BtVS" as crafted by Whedon. The first episode, "Anne," reminds Buffy of why she is the slayer (i.e., function as a way of getting late comers to the party up to speed on the Slayer). Again the season is divided into two halves, the first focusing on Faith ("Faith, Hope & Trick") and the second on the Mayor's Ascension ("Graduation Day"). Like the previous season, the part of the first half (Spike & Dru) joins the party of the second half (Angelus), just like Faith joins forces with the Mayor. Consequently, a season of "BtVS" has a sense of overall narrative structure more developed than most television dramas. What also matters is that Whedon finds the actors to play the parts. Eliza Dushku makes Faith a ticking time bomb who represents the Dark Side of being a Slayer (not to mention being as far removed from Kendra as possible), while Harry Groener as Mayor Richard Wilkins III takes the traditional politeness of a villain to a new level of giddy charm.
The final element, which best defines the uniqueness of Season Three, is that arguably the very best episodes were actually those that did NOT have to do with the major plot threads. There are two fun return visits as Sunnydale is afflicted by another visit from Ethan Raine in "Band Candy" and comes back to kidnap Willow for some witchy help in winning back Dru's love. Fortunately we did not have to wait for Season Four for a visit to "Doppelgangland" after our first taste of the alternative Buffyverse in "The Wish." I was always surprised Whedon did not release those two on a videotape as an addendum to the Season Three Videotape set (double ditto for "Once More, With Feeling"). However, after the Senior gift given to Buffy at "The Prom," the no holds barred fight between Buffy and Faith in "Graduation Day, Part I" and Buffy letting Angel feed on her in "Graduation Day, Part II," the Mayor's actual Ascension seems rather anti-climatic.
Buffy supporting cast fares very well in Season Three. "Amends," the episode submitted for Emmy consideration, gives Buffy and Angel some of their best final scenes together as star crossed lovers while Xander finally has a moment of glory in "The Zeppo" (I find the background apocalypse scenes hysterical and love the fact the Zeppo reference is never explained in the episode at all). Cordy makes her own case for being a Slayer in "Homecoming," Giles touches on new meanings of his role as Buffy's father-figure in "Band Candy" and "Helpless," and the only thing more fun than watching Alyson Hannigan play Vamp Willow in "The Wish" was watching her play Willow playing Vamp Willow in "Dopplegangland."
"Buffy the Vampire Slayer" received a lot of unwanted publicity during the spring of 1999 when two episodes--"Earshot" and "Graduation Day, Part Two"--were pulled from being aired because of the shootings at Columbine High School. Ultimately, these proved to be overreactions, but certainly Whedon and the show were fortunate that Columbine happened the week before "Earshot" and not the week afterwards, because I really do not know if "BtVS" would have been able to survive that realignment of events. On balance and from the perspective of the middle of Season Seven, I think Season Three will ultimately be considered the best season of "Buffy the Vampire Slayer."
43 people found this helpful
Robert W. MooreReviewed in the United States on September 4, 2003
5.0 out of 5 stars
Yet another stunning season from Joss Whedon and Co.
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Now, looking back on BUFFY THE VAMPIRE SLAYER after seven utterly brilliant seasons, the magnitude of their achievement is still difficult to gauge. Every season managed to be unique and original, both making a host of connections with the seasons preceding it, as well as carrying it boldly towards new plot lines, new characters, and fresh crises. After the amazing second season of Buffy, with the heartbreaking story of Buffy and Angel's great love, it didn't seem possible that producer Joss Whedon and his crew could match their prior achievement. Was Season Three better than Season Two? Season Five better than either? Six as good as any of those? It really doesn't matter. What is amazing is that for seven years, they managed to produce the most consistently fascinating series that television has ever seen, completely redefining what it was possible for the medium to do.
Season Three opens with one of my all time favorite episodes of BUFFY, "Anne." Buffy, after the shattering events that close Season Two, flees Sunnydale for Los Angeles, where she gets a job as a waitress in a diner using her middle name, Anne. She has renounced her past, her name, her vocation as slayer, and her sense of purpose in life. By accident, she reluctantly agrees to help a girl, and ends up in a massive industrial plant run by demons and powered by human slave labor, with all the slaves reduced to identifying themselves as "No One." One of the truly triumphant moments comes when one of the demons, going down a line of fresh slaves and forcing each one to identify him or herself as "No One," arrives at Buffy, who up till this moment has rejected both her name and her vocation, and asks her who she is, to which she replies: "I'm Buffy, the Vampire Slayer." Simultaneously reembracing both her name and her vocation, she then proceeds to seriously smack demon butt in one of the best fight sequences in the entire run of the show.
The major plot lines of Season Three include the arrival of Faith, a somewhat rogue slayer who is Buffy's bad girl alter ego; the return of Angel from the demon dimension to which he had been sent at the end of Season Two; the attempt of the Mayor of Sunnydale to transform himself into a nearly invincible demon; Giles's termination as Buffy's watcher and the appointment of a new watcher, Wesley Wyndam-Pryce; and Buffy's ongoing struggle to find some kind equilibrium between her vocation as slayer and her desire to have a normal teenage life. At the end of the season, Angel, realizing his relationship with Buffy is an impossible one, leaves Sunnydale for Los Angeles, where he will accidentally be joined both by Cordelia (who will mature from bratty Queen Bitch of Sunnydale High School into a magnificent heroine in her own right) and the prissy Wesley, who will eventually gain in heroic stature himself. This illustrates the optimistic message of the Buffyverse: people can change and become more than they are. Clearly, in the Buffyverse, leopards can indeed change their spots, and people manage to do that with great regularity. Vampires and demons as well.
Season Three brings to an end the Scooby Gangs high school years. From this season forward, they will all be struggling with the kinds of issues that signal the passage to adulthood. In this the philosophy of the makers of the series is manifest: life is not a state, but a process. People constantly deal with new problems and new situations. People change. Joss Whedon has said that in creating Buffy he created a character we could care about. And we do. We love her and the rest of the Scooby Gang because they are not static, because they do change, because they constantly meet new challenges and difficulties, and not just monsters and vampires. We love them because they experience the same things we do.
6 people found this helpful
calvinnmeReviewed in the United States on November 14, 2005
5.0 out of 5 stars
A tale of two slayers
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The third season of Buffy is the last season in which Buffy and her friends are high schoolers. It would have been very hard to top the outstanding season two of the series, but this one comes close. The season starts out slow with individual episodes that are just not up to par with the ones from season two. In particular, I thought the season premiere, "Anne", in which Buffy is a runaway, was a disappointment as was "Dead Man's Party" and "Band Candy", where all of the adult residents of Sunnydale regain their teen personas.

However, the season story arc involving the second fallen slayer, "Faith", and the season villain, the mayor, are excellent. The mayor has the outward trappings of someone who you'd expect to be leading small-town America. He's a booster of the boy scouts, a big believer in nutrition and law and order, and also an immortal whose goal is to be transformed into pure demon form. Faith, the second slayer, becomes drawn to the dark side in general and to the mayor in particular after a series of unfortunate events that leave her feeling that Sunnydale is Buffy's town and that she will always be the outsider. She figures if she has the name, she might as well play the game of bad seed. The mayor becomes a kind of father figure and evil "watcher" for Faith after her own watcher, Wesley, tries to remedy matters but just makes matters worse. For those of you who are also "Angel" fans, it is interesting to watch the character of Wesley who is basically bufoonish comic relief in this season of Buffy, and to see him in "Angel" transform into a Indiana Jones type character of tremendous bravery as that series progresses.

One of the more interesting season mini-arcs involves Xander's romantic betrayal of Cordelia and the introduction of Anya, a vengeance demon who comes to Sunnydale to help Cordelia get her revenge via an extremely reckless wish that has interesting consequences to say the least. Another particularly interesting individual episode was written by Joss Whedon entitled "Amends" that takes place at Christmas. It is clearly meant to be episode zero of the "Angel" series that debuts the following year. In it we learn much about Angel's past, and on that level it is an outstanding episode. However, the spirit that is tormenting Angel during this episode, the First Evil, was a puzzling presence that just seemed to be a device to tell Angel's story. It is odd that the series would use the First Evil as the villain for the entirety of season seven when it didn't even make much sense for this one episode.

In summary, season three in its entirety is very satisfying, and the season villain, the Mayor, is one of the series most interesting. There are just a few individual episodes, particularly during the first half of the season that are just not that great especially when measured against the yardstick of season two of Buffy.
M. G WatsonReviewed in the United States on June 14, 2006
5.0 out of 5 stars
"A proper bit of violence."
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It always warms the cuckles of me non-beating heart to watch Buffy's Third Season. I've always thought the 56 episodes which have our heroes based out of Sunnydale High School were the best this great series produced, because amidst all the humor and horror and high drama the show's writers always managed to pack in the everyday details of life at 17: the painful (and usually unsuccessful) quest for popularity and acceptance; the awkwardness of being almost-but-not-quite-grown up; the struggle to define your identity; the feeling that the system is stacked against you now and e'er shall be; and the love-triangles that inevitably stick a pointy end in somebody's ticker. The truth is always the best fiction, and while your high school may not have had vampires prowling the hallways, five will get ya ten it had Cordelia.

What distinguished Buffy from most other TV shows was its consistency. During these early years nearly every episode is an A and even the very occasional clunker usually has enough shiny moments to get a wink and a nod. In Season Three, only one outing really rang false for me - the forced and desultory "Dead Man's Party" - and even that its moments.

Of course no discussion of S 3 would be possible without talking about its twin heavies, Faith and Mayor Richard Wilkins III. As the unstable and vicious renegade Slayer, Eliza Dushku brings the kind of scene-stealing negative chemistry which the show's best story arcs always thrived on. Harry Groener, on the other hand, gave a brilliant and hilarious performance as a sort of evil Ned Flanders, whimsically gollying and aw-shucksing his way to demonhood. These two had a fine chemistry and an almost touching father-daughter dynamic which mirrored that of Buffy and Giles.

The best of the best:

"Homecoming" - Feeling like she's failed to make her mark at Sunnydale High, Buffy challenges Cordelia for the tiara unaware that a posse of mercenary killers is planning to make trophies of her and the newly-arrived Faith. Charisma Carpenter, whose character had softened somewhat while dating Xander, dusts off her hilariously cruel A-game bitchiness in response, and Xander and Willow finally, finally lock lips in a beautifully written and acted scene that caps two years of subtly increasing tension. This episode has the funniest ending since the "Oedipus" bit at the end of S 1's "The Puppet Show."

"Band Candy" - Writers use the term "Maguffin" to describe a plot device which furthers the story. In this case the Maguffin is possessed cocco-riffic chocolate bars which make adults revert back to their adolescence. The scenes between the dippy gum-chewing Joyce and a cigarette-smoking, Cockney-speaking Giles are absolutely hilarious. Armin Shimmerman is also great playing Snyder as the kid everybody loved to ditch.

"Lover's Walk" - James Marsters was in only one episode of this season, yet managed to wreak two seasons worth of havoc. By the time Spike leaves town, drunkenly bellowing out the lyrics to the Clash's rendition of Sinatra's "My Way", the relationship of every couple on the show is in ruins. This show has superb writing even by BtVS standards: Spike's cruelty, his drunken self pity and his surprisingly brilliant observations about love are all first class.

"The Wish" - This is a fantastic episode which, thanks to Cordelia, has our heroes living in an alternate universe where Buffy never came to Sunnydale and the Master reigns supreme. Mark Metcalf always played this character with a kind of whimsical genius and he's on the top of his game as the playfully evil supreme vampire. Nicky Brendon and Allyson Hannigan are scene-stealing as leather-clad vampire versions of their regular-world selves. Also the first appearance of Emma Caulfield's Anya.

"Amends" - The ghosts of Angelus' past victims, including Robia LaMorte's Jenny Calendar, show up to torment him on Christmas Eve, but all is not as it appears. I loved the showdown scenes between David Boreanaz and Anthony Head and also the tearjerker between Boreanaz and Sarah Gellar on the bluffs outside of town. Most Christmas episodes descend into schmaltz, but this one avoids that fate. Also marks the first appearance of, well, the First Evil, which returns as the Big Bad in Season Seven.

"The Zeppo" - Xander is probably my favorite character in the B-verse, and this clever episode, which intertwines real and red-herring plots, reminded me of why. Struggling to be taken seriously by his super-empowered friends, we follow Xander through "one of those days" that could only happen in Sunnydale.

"Doppelgangland" - A sort of sequel to "The Wish" has the alternate-universe Willow show up in Sunnydale to wreak havoc and make her alter-ego very, very uncomfortable. Great work by Allyson Hannigan as the God-isn't-it-great-to-be-evil sexually depraved vamp.

I also thought "Anne", "Helpless", "Earshot" and "The Prom" were very fine pieces of work, but really the season has too many great moments to list. The additions of Caulfield and Alexis Denisoff as Wesley Wyndam-Price were icing on a very big cake. So leave it to Oz to come up with the perfect epitaph for the first three seasons: "Guys, take a moment to deal with this. We survived."

Buffy: "It was a hell of a battle."

Oz: "Not the battle. High school."
One person found this helpful
D. MokReviewed in the United States on June 17, 2003
4.0 out of 5 stars
The fabulous Eliza Dushku livens up the show.
Verified purchase
After the acclaimed, almost legendary second season of the show, where the series achieved the perfect balance between its buoyant humour and unexpected moments of pathos, Buffy the Vampire Slayer showed signs of tiring out a little. In Season 3, the creators of the show seem a little heavy-handed, laying on the emotional gravity so thick that the humour is often drowned -- and the humour is what makes the characters so lovable in the first place, providing contrast to the emotional outbursts.
Buffy's character in Season 3 starts to become a mite too sourpuss for my taste, brooding and moralizing her way through the episodes, showing much less that vibrant sense of humour that had made her so great in the beginning. Sarah Michelle Gellar's performance in the first two seasons was much more nuanced; in this season, every episode gives her a chance to do the troubled, locked-brow, pursed-lip expression. Maybe it's just me, but hitting Buffy's internal turmoil every single episode seems too much. Good thing the supporting cast keeps up the energy: Nicholas Brendon, Alyson Hannigan and Anthony Stewart Head continue to play their roles with relish, and David Boreanaz leaves the show (to move on to his own show, Angel) in style.
This season is weaker than the previous one, but it benefits from the addition of two major talents: Star Eliza Dushku and writer Jane Espenson. Dushku, a veteran actress at the tender age of 18 during this time, had been a perennial scene-stealer (most notably in True Lies), is easily the most charismatic actor ever to appear in the Buffy series -- a notable feat given competition from James Marsters, Hannigan and Boreanaz. And her character Faith, the psychologically troubled, explosive renegade slayer, is justifiably a favourite of the show's history, athletic, sexy, dark and vulnerable at the same time, made all the more likeable by her very prominent character flaws.
And the show's already formidable roster of writers (Joss Whedon, Marti Noxon and Douglas Petrie are ever-reliable) is strengthened by the addition of Jane Espenson, a smart writer whose signature is much like Noxon's in the second season -- with a focus on wry, witty episodes that present humour and character advancement in equal measure. Her hilarious "Earshot" and "Gingerbread" are two of the best episodes this season.
I don't watch this DVD set as much as I had the last two, but for a show to go three seasons and retain so much value is a real feat. Despite some shortcomings, this set is still a must-buy, if only to watch Eliza Dushku chomp up the scenary in one of the best TV performances I can remember.
One person found this helpful
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