Children of Blood and Bone
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Children of Blood and Bone Audible Audiobook – Unabridged

4.7 out of 5 stars 11,772 ratings

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Product details

Listening Length 17 hours and 56 minutes
Author Tomi Adeyemi
Narrator Bahni Turpin
Whispersync for Voice Ready
Audible.com Release Date March 06, 2018
Publisher Macmillan Audio
Program Type Audiobook
Version Unabridged
Language English
ASIN B075NR7HC3
Best Sellers Rank #693 in Audible Books & Originals (See Top 100 in Audible Books & Originals)
#1 in Fiction on Racism & Discrimination for Teens
#6 in Teen & Young Adult Myths & Legends
#9 in Teen & Young Adult Fiction about Prejudice & Racism

Customer reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
4.7 out of 5
11,772 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Reviewed in the United States on August 16, 2018
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240 people found this helpful
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Reviewed in the United States on March 12, 2018
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582 people found this helpful
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Reviewed in the United States on August 30, 2018
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Reviewed in the United States on March 18, 2018
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Top reviews from other countries

Arkham Reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars Engrossing start to the series
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 11, 2018
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49 people found this helpful
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gizmo91
5.0 out of 5 stars Incredible, deeply involving and magical novel.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 12, 2018
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25 people found this helpful
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Harmony Kent
5.0 out of 5 stars Most compelling book I've read in years
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 23, 2018
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12 people found this helpful
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Muse
5.0 out of 5 stars This is one of those books that gets better and better as you keep on reading.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 18, 2018
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6 people found this helpful
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5.0 out of 5 stars A welcome approach to Afro-mysticism; a must-read!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 19, 2018
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5.0 out of 5 stars A welcome approach to Afro-mysticism; a must-read!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 19, 2018
The story follows a young girl: Zélie. She is haunted by the murder of her mother and the subjugation of her Reaper clan - one of the ten Maji clans oppressed by the ruling class of Orïsha. Circumstances see her journeying and fighting alongside her brother and an escaped princess to restore magic to the land and allow her clan and the nine other Maji clans in the land, a fighting chance. In this story, the ruling class of Orïsha can be seen as a metaphor for oppressive classes or races across the world, with the Reaper clan and other formerly magic clans being forced to live in slums, work as slaves and suffer abuse from corporal power.

As with many Young Adult novels, Children Of Blood And Bone is also love story—in the romantic and familial sense—as well as a story of self discovery. The added beauty of this narrative is its Afro-mysticism: a genre that is finally getting its deserved spotlight after existing off the fringes of literary discourse, and being conflated with magic-realism. In this Afro-mystical novel, the magical, in the African sense, is not othered as something from a scary, unknown, feared presence but, rather, portrayed as a gift from the deities. These deities are pointedly inspired by the Nigerian, Yoruba tradition.

In Yoruba tradition, children are named to reflect the circumstance of birth, or, as prophecy into their destinies. The names given to a child usually holds weight both on paper and when sounded out. In both reading and sounding out the names—particularly of the four central characters—I felt no depth. On the other hand, as a friend suggests, the ambiguity of the names could be seen as representative of the loss of and disdain for magic across Orïsha. In this sense, Zélie and Tzain’s names can be seen to reflect the new Maji existence under their tyrannical, magic-hating ruler, and displacement from their true identity. Though this perspective is equally valid, it is with one exception: the novel’s time frame.

That aside, it's a really good read that explores a good number of themes in a unique way. A must-read! Looking forward to the sequel: Children Of Virtue and Vengeance!
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