Crisis in Six Scenes

Season 1
 (7,236)
6.62016X-RayUHD13+
This is a comedy that takes place in the 1960's during turbulent times in the United States and a middle class suburban family is visited by a guest who turns their household completely upside down.
Starring
Woody AllenMiley CyrusElaine May
Genres
ComedyHistorical
Subtitles
English [CC]DeutschEspañol (Latinoamérica)Español (España)FrançaisItaliano日本語Português
Audio languages
EnglishEnglish [Audio Description]Español (España)ItalianoEspañol (Latinoamérica)日本語PortuguêsDeutschFrançais
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  1. 1. Episode 1
    Watch on supported devices
    September 29, 2016
    24min
    13+
    Subtitles
    English [CC], Deutsch, Español (Latinoamérica), Español (España), Français, Italiano, 日本語, Português
    Audio languages
    English, English [Audio Description], Español (España), Italiano, Español (Latinoamérica), 日本語, Português, Deutsch, Français
    A middle-class suburban home— all seems well until a dangerous intruder enters in the dead of night.
  2. 2. Episode 2
    September 29, 2016
    25min
    13+
    Subtitles
    English [CC], Deutsch, Español (Latinoamérica), Español (España), Français, Italiano, 日本語, Português
    Audio languages
    English, English [Audio Description], Español (España), Italiano, Español (Latinoamérica), 日本語, Português, Deutsch, Français
    An unwelcome intruder causes terrible panic and tension in a usually placid household.
  3. 3. Episode 3
    September 29, 2016
    24min
    13+
    Subtitles
    English [CC], Deutsch, Español (Latinoamérica), Español (España), Français, Italiano, 日本語, Português
    Audio languages
    English, English [Audio Description], Español (España), Italiano, Español (Latinoamérica), 日本語, Português, Deutsch, Français
    Because of an armed intruder, after a home invasion, a married couple's life is turned upside-down.
  4. 4. Episode 4
    September 29, 2016
    25min
    13+
    Subtitles
    English [CC], Deutsch, Español (Latinoamérica), Español (España), Français, Italiano, 日本語, Português
    Audio languages
    English, English [Audio Description], Español (España), Italiano, Español (Latinoamérica), 日本語, Português, Deutsch, Français
    Romantic alliances fray and conflict in the suburban home reaches a boiling point.
  5. 5. Episode 5
    September 29, 2016
    24min
    13+
    Subtitles
    English [CC], Deutsch, Español (Latinoamérica), Español (España), Français, Italiano, 日本語, Português
    Audio languages
    English, English [Audio Description], Español (España), Italiano, Español (Latinoamérica), 日本語, Português, Deutsch, Français
    A middle-class husband and wife put their lives in jeopardy carrying out a dangerous assignment.
  6. 6. Episode 6
    September 29, 2016
    25min
    13+
    Subtitles
    English [CC], Deutsch, Español (Latinoamérica), Español (España), Français, Italiano, 日本語, Português
    Audio languages
    English, English [Audio Description], Español (España), Italiano, Español (Latinoamérica), 日本語, Português, Deutsch, Français
    Finally a resolution but not before chaos, surprising disclosures, police and guns come into play.

More details

Directors
Woody Allen
Producers
Erika AronsonHelen Robin
Season year
2016
Network
Amazon Studios
Content advisory
Smokingfoul languagesexual contentviolence
Purchase rights
Stream instantly Details
Format
Prime Video (streaming online video)
Devices
Available to watch on supported devices

Reviews

3.2 out of 5 stars

7236 global ratings

  1. 29% of reviews have 5 stars
  2. 18% of reviews have 4 stars
  3. 16% of reviews have 3 stars
  4. 16% of reviews have 2 stars
  5. 22% of reviews have 1 stars
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Top reviews from the United States

B. WellsReviewed in the United States on October 2, 2016
4.0 out of 5 stars
Woody Travels a Familiar Road
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I'm a Woody Allen fan from way back but I'll be the first to admit that a certain amount of his output, especially his most recent films ("Cafe Society"and "Irrational Man") have just plain sucked. Yet, what I have discovered along the way is that Allen, even at his best, is a uniquely personal choice, depending largely on the viewer's tolerance for the filmmaker's self-centered worldview, the constant barrage of verbiage in his films and his absurdist (often repetitive) humor. He's not for everybody, that's for sure, and he can sometimes be grating, even to his most ardent supporters. After binge-watching his latest effort, the Amazon Prime miniseries "Crisis in Six Scenes", I have to say that I completely disagree with the majority of mainstream critics (and Woody haters) who have been busily sharpening their knives in anticipation of yet another late-career disaster from the great comedian.

The story, set in the sixties, has Allen playing an elderly version of his typical nebbishy self, this time a successful ad writer with a wine-swilling marriage counselor/wife (Elaine May) and a large, rambling house in the suburbs. When a young, female radical (Miley Cyrus) breaks into their house in the middle of the night, the comfortable life of the complacent older couple is upended. On the run from the law for a shooting it out with police, the young woman vehemently disapproves of Allen's bourgeois lifestyle but bonds with the wife, who, it turns out, was taken in and raised by the girl's grandparents when she, herself, was a child. This is the setup for the series of misadventures that befall the characters throughout the six episodes of "Crisis in Six Scenes". In a way, it's vintage Allen, with rambling monologues (some funny, some not), easily missed one-liners, unlikely couplings and unlikelier situations. That he never captures the essence or tone of the sixties didn't really bother me, as it has many viewers (and critics): the show can be viewed as a slight, satirical critique of our own tumultuous times, as much as the sixties (which I actually thought Allen was going for). Although some of the jokes are familiar to the point of feeling like retreads, I laughed a lot, and thoroughly enjoyed the performances. If you've seen Woody Allen act in his other movies, you already know to expect the oddly funny, neurotic New Yorker bit; I like his onscreen persona and by now, he's as comforting as an old sweatshirt. The much-maligned Miley Cyrus acquits herself nicely as the revolutionary: she's smart, charismatic and appealing, playing an appealing, charismatic character who's not quite as smart as she thinks she is. That her character is never really believable is almost beside the point, because she's not meant to be taken seriously (the people in Allen's films tend to have lofty, ambitious, sometimes dangerous goals and their deadly (and verbose) earnestness often underscores how silly or misguided they can be, but that's part of their funny charm). The terrific Elaine May, as the wife, is very funny in a role that seems as if it were originally written with Diane Keaton in mind. In actuality, with Allen's advancing age showing, he and May make a great screen couple. The supporting performances are also very good, particularly the actors portraying the members of May's reading group, and those playing her counseling clients.

The look of the show is great, although it certainly does not evoke any sense of 1960's America. There's a side plot involving Allen and his writing partner trying to sell a TV show to some network execs but that goes nowhere and adds nothing to the show.

All in all, I genuinely liked "Crisis in Six Scenes". Other Woody Allen fans will probably like it best, knowing in advance that he is mining familiar territory, with no surprises, no cutting-edge humor, just Woody being Woody.
8 people found this helpful
JoshReviewed in the United States on October 3, 2016
5.0 out of 5 stars
A 'Crisis' for Woody Allen equals comedy for the rest of us.
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It never gets old, and it's the simplest of equations: a crisis for Woody Allen equals comedy for the rest of us.

Despite a slightly soft resolution for such a strong premise, an almost too-short story arc (I thought he could have easily got 8 or 9 episodes out of this situation), and an emotionally distant and angry-no-matter-what performance from Miley Cyrus (granted, an obviously talented performer, but her character here, a cold and rambling revolutionary, was a little too one-note, even for a comic foil to Allen's understandly anxious objections), Crisis in Six Scenes is a funny, smart, and laugh-out-loud Woody Allen comedy at it's nervous best.

'Crisis' is set in the socially tumultuous late 1960's and revolves around a television writer Sidney J. Munsinger (Allen) and his strong willed, sympathetic wife Kay (Elaine May), suddenly dealing with a potentially dangerous uninvited guest, Lennie (Miley Cyrus) breaking into their country home in the middle of the night and who, despite fervent goading, refuses to leave. That would be fodder enough, but it turns out (slight spoiler) that Lennie is a political revolutionary who is wanted by the law. Sidney on the other hand, just wants peace and quiet (and to watch televised baseball games in peace), and, most importantly, to not be implicated in harboring a fugitive. Lennie just wants a place to hide out from the law and simply won't take no for an answer. Kay takes pity on the intruder and invites her to stay. Comedy, as they say, ensues.

There are some great comic moments here (without spoiling it, the final episode's doorbell scene alone is worth the price of admission...er, subscription). There are the two lovers, Alan and Ellie (John Magaro and Rachel Brosnahan, respectively) who are deeply in love, and whose engagement becomes threatened by the alluring Lennie. Kay belongs to a ladies bookclub (the bookclub ladies kill me), at first discussing typical book club fodder but thanks to Kay (and Lennie's influence on Kay), begin planning naked sit ins and quoting Chariman Mao.
Each character is funny in their own right. Once Allen and May go along for the ride, their situation only gets worse, and as they say, more comedy ensues.

Though mostly behind the camera these days, Allen is very welcome back on screen doing what he does best, and he's still as funny and neurotic as ever. And despite the natural law of time and age that affects us all, his energy and commitment to the moment is still near perfection. Elaine May can do no wrong here and is the prefect ying to Allen's yang. She single handedly make this easily unbelievable situation believable, entertaining, and endearing. There are some great funny familiar faces from Lewis Black to Joy Behar to Judy Gold and the supporting cast is just as delightful in their respective parts. The comic moments are a lot of fun, though I do wish they would have let them play out more, give them a bit more time to stew; to let Woody and Elaine do what they do best, play these moments for all they're worth. Still, the subject matter itself is as fresh, relevant, and important as it is funny, and just as apropos today as it was then. It's social commentary without being preechy. Equal parts political and playful.
As a big Woody Allen fan I'm well aware that not all of his endeavors end up as masterpieces. This one may not be his best EVER, but it certainly is up there with the good stuff.

Bottom line- I laughed. A lot.

Crisis was a return to form for Allen in his early days of silly situations mixed with serious topics and despite wanting a bit more comic business from some of the well-set up sitauations in this series, I hope more of this kind of comedy from him (and with him in it) is in store for us in the future.

Thanks Amazon! Thanks Woody! Thanks Mao!
4 people found this helpful
BridgmanReviewed in the United States on October 2, 2016
1.0 out of 5 stars
Clunky, unsatisfying, inaccurate
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Woody Allen has gotten a free pass for years. The clunky dialogue, the jokes you can see coming from miles away, the poor plotting. In part it's because he's always gotten good actors and cinematographers. A larger part is that he has a New York sensibility and in his prime shot his movies in New York, making the city look romantic even in its grimiest era (compare the New York of "Annie Hall," 1977, to "Taxi Driver," 1976), endearing himself to New York critics and making living in New York look like something that gives life meaning and value no matter what you're doing there. He uses terrific cinematographers. Also, Allen's likable and his stand up career in the 60s was genuinely funny and fresh.
"Crisis in Six Scenes" is awful. There's nothing compelling about any of the characters and Allen's persona—the neurotic New Yorker—grates now. When he goes off on a rant, you want him to just shut up and hope that some action can move things forward. Keep hoping.
I found myself so distracted by the anachronisms and poor continuity that it was hard to take any of it seriously.
The story takes place in 1968. And yet:
* He and his wife have a burglar alarm that automatically dials the police. Almost no one had those in a private residence then, especially upper middle class suburban couples.
* An electrical storm knocks the phones out but not the electricity? The opposite is true. And if the phones had been knocked out, how did the burglar alarm call the police?
* He wakes up and exclaims that it's "four o'clock in the morning" without looking at the clock on his bedside table, which in any case is for some reason facing the wall opposite the headboard, making it impossible for him to see. (There is no clock on the mantle that he would have seen.)
* His barber uses the word "narcolepsy." That condition was not widely known in 1968 and the word for it even less so.
* There's a smiley face refrigerator magnet. The graphic had been around but wasn't popular in 1968 and was not put on buttons and other objects until the early 1970s.
* The kitchen has a twin stainless steel sink. Unheard of then.
* The Miley Cyrus character uses the phrase "limousine liberal," a phrase not coined until 1969 and not in the general vernacular until the mid 1970s.
* The concept of bra burning (a myth, by the way) wasn't known for another year.
* Reparations to African Americans for slavery was a topic, but an extremely obscure one and unlikely to be brought up even by the radical left.
* The Elaine May character hosts a book club. Those were very uncommon in the form presented here until the 1990s. Also, somehow all ten members of it file into her house at the same time even though the house is clearly accessible only by car. Did they gather in the driveway first? Why?
* Flesh-eating viruses (correctly, it's flesh-eating bacteria) was not known in 1968, even by hypochondriacs.
* Using 911 to call for emergency help was not in effect in New York State until 1973.
* References to the author J.D. Salinger are frequent and used as if he were a powerful and widely known author across a wide demographic of Americans. In 1968 Salinger hadn't published anything for five years (the cryptic "Raise High the Roof Beam, Carpenters and Seymour: An Introduction") and his best-known work, "The Catcher in the Rye" (1951) was taught in very few schools. He was a cult author at the time, unlikely to have been read by barbers and state troopers.
OK, I hear you: Artistic license, don't quibble about details, suspend disbelief, blah, blah, blah. I understand that. But at some point, things of this nature need at least some connection to their reality. Imagine if a "Game of Thrones" character said "Groovy, baby!"
A final observation: It's interesting that the basic plot is that a pretty young woman invades his and his wife's house and that from the start his greatest, most often expressed wish is for her to leave. It's like Allen's trying to make up for what he's done in real life.
Skip this, watch "Fleabag." It's very good.
14 people found this helpful
S. AbisselReviewed in the United States on December 26, 2016
3.0 out of 5 stars
Crisis In 3 or Possibly 3.5 Scenes Would've Probably Been Way "Woodier"
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Ok, so you know going in that this won't be Annie Hall" or "Love & Death", but based on the cast...and casting, you're hoping for a light, fun--and funny, binge-watch worthy diversion along the lines of "Scenes from a Mall" or "Small Time Crooks"...which this COULD have been if it was 3 to 3.5 "scenes" less. To me, the biggest crisis was expecting Woody to smoothly transition from "Allen the Auteur" to "Allen the Amazon Prime Property". I mean his films while for the most part smart and funny(tho "humorous", describes 'em way better), are not what generally comes to mind when one thinks ultra-mass market "Summer Tentpole Blockbuster", so when his "marriage" to Amazon (aka the reigning champ of ultra-mass market ANYTHING) was announced, I guess the hope was that if anyone could get the multi-billion $$ juggernaut that IS Amazon to respect creative integrity, experience, and vision, it would be Woody. Instead, I just finished watching the (very)mildly better than average equivalent of a network TV movie (or possibly two nite mini-series), that's thrown on in that "neither here nor there" period in May/June when tv series are in rerun mode ('til fall anyway) and those 8-10 week, limited run Summer series aren't yet set to debut. The time when networks try to keep the ratings momentum of their "sweeps" and big-ass season finales going, by throwing "lighter fare on the air"... tho not just any lighter fare, but lighter fare with some saleable " marquee"value. Truth is, if the stuff was really good, they'd air it during their all-important sweeps weeks, instead they air it where it'll serve as a the equivalent of a salad at Macdonalds, a menu item that doesn't have to impress or even really "sell", but is still needed on the menu to show some modicum of corporate responsibility...and divert attention from the 300 billion or so burgers MickeyD's has sold to date. Is "Crisis In Six Scenes" the Macdonald's salad of Woody's body of work? Kind of. I mean at this point neither he or Macdonalds have anything to prove, style-wise, light fluff like "Crisis in 6 scenes" isn't what comes to mind when people hear "Woody Allen" any more than "salad" is what comes the mind when people hear "Macdonald's". In short(ironic as that sounds after the preceding Megillah)you're going into this in hopes of finally experiencing a "binge-able" version of Woody at his finest, you're probably better off spending the day with 3 to 5 of his classics, stuff that brings to mind a time when the only selling out Woody did took place in the theatres showing his movies. One of the few parts that for me were more than just tolerable were the ones with Bobby Slayton. His scenes were fun to watch, because you saw HE was having fun. In any case, if u DO take the plunge and check out Crisis, pay attention to Miley Cyruses character, her lines while rooted in the 60's sensibility, could also serve as an admonishment to Mr Woody for the extreme level of his sell out to the biggest of big business... Amazon
Michael LonestarReviewed in the United States on October 5, 2016
3.0 out of 5 stars
Wish It Were Better, But Not A Total Loss
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I am a Woody Allen fan, plain and simple. I am familiar with his movies, his books, and even his early stand-up, so I was more than a little tantalized when I heard that he was putting this six episodes together for Amazon. He reluctantly said yes and I guess he has regretted it ever since, even to the point that he feels that Amazon will never forgive him for what he considers a fiasco. I watched the complete package over the last three days and while I did not find Crisis in Six Scenes abhorrent, I found it a little rough sailing, especially the first two episodes.

I don't think I really liked the premise of the sitcom. Miley Cyrus, a terrorist, shacked up with Allen and (Elaine) May seemed a little outre even for the late sixties, which is the time period for this piece. I never cared for Miley, even though I think she put forth a lot of effort into her part. Elaine May IS a gem as many other reviewers have said. She nailed her character. Woody was, well, Woody. Many of the scenes, especially the indoor scenes seem endless. Everyone is long-winded, discussing Chairman Mao, Karl Marx, oligarchy, Fidel Castro and others to death without adding anything of interest to the mix. The humor is not up to Allen's standard. While a lot was chuckle-worthy, I didn't find consistent laughs.

The outdoor scenes were much better. The photography was very good, with a lot a thought in the scene set up and location. I thought the actors were well chose. I loved Michael Rapaport's turn as the New York State trooper in the last episode, perhaps the best of the bunch. It was also nice to see a few other familiar faces such as Joy Behar and Rebecca Schull from "Wings."

All in all, I did not think that Crisis in Six Scenes was a waste of time. Mr. Allen has done a lifetime of writing movie scripts. I am not a professional in this area, but I know that writing sit-com episodes is not a simple feat. The jokes have to come at a rapid-fire pace, especially nowadays. This "experiment" is more of his movie style but encapsulated over six separate episodes. It doesn't really work. I don't think he will try this again. That's a shame because I think if he had more time to put it together, he could have come up with a better product. Don't forget that he is still cranking out a movie a year! In any case it was a valiant effort.
3 people found this helpful
kinetikxReviewed in the United States on November 1, 2016
3.0 out of 5 stars
Choosing Miley was a huge mistake.
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I've been a fan of nearly all things Woody Allen for decades. Not everything is a homerun but taken as a whole they are all at least worth watching.

In this case though Miley Cyrus took me right out of the show and had me scratching my head.

Knowing what I do of Woody's casting process, which involves choosing people he thinks will fit a part and just bringing them in to work with no audition necessary
I've got to say, it was a huge mistake in this instance. Maybe I bring my own baggage of thinking she is a hack with no talent other than being a child star who could sing.

Kind of.

In a banal, pop, teen star way. That is to say, basically an empty shell who is told what to do and how to sound but with no artistic talent of her own. All you have to do is look at what she has been producing for many years now and she's just over-sexualizing her performances to make up for a lack of real talent.

The rest of the show is, so far, after a few episodes, just plain Woody. No brilliant flashes of who we've come to know over the years. His output is phenominal in terms of quantity but his quality seems to be falling off. And I'm fine with that. I just like the fact that he keeps plugging away. Unfortunately in this case, the fact that he made an obvious commercial choice, most likely thinking Miley would bring a younger audience (which really, he does all the time when he casts a young ingenue, which usually fits, or at least works serviceably enough), was a misfire of epic proportions in this case. Woody Allen fans could care less about some young tallentless hack who has millions of Twitter followers. What they want is a great performance. And that's the one thing this woman can't provide.

Such a waste of a great opportunity for Woody to break into a more current market. And that makes me sad. But maybe some 15-20 year old will discover some of his older films and maybe that makes it worth it. I guess.
SasheenieReviewed in the United States on October 15, 2016
5.0 out of 5 stars
I absolutely loved this series - "we all disagree with the politics
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I absolutely loved this series - "we all disagree with the politics, the bigotry, the polaristion of wealth, education andbusiness, BUT we do nothig about it...." says, May (or words to that effect) - this is so TRUE! well thank you Woody Allen for writing down your conscience into this series (maybe this will rick the conscience of all of us). Those that didn't like this or that - how absolutely shallow is your mind or your inner vision!

background: I am from South Africa, grew up in the days of Apartheid, witnessed and voted for the first Mandela Presidency....well done and all that....was allowed to go to grad school and all that as a woman of color, reached financial freedom and become an eccentric, cynic, and have my freedom in my mind that all PEOPLE ARE EQUAL AND FREE BUT BOUND BY THEIR OWN CHAINS but now, my heart bleeds when absolute power in the hands of J.Zuma (JZ) breeds absolute corruption.

MY FINAL POINT: in 1992, after President Mandela took office, and later when Archbishop Tutu chaired the Truth&Reconciliation Committee, most, if not all, white south africans said "we knew apartheid was wrong, but what could we do about it? we felt so helpless! and all the priviliges were so comforting. we knew we were mediocre and ordinary, but that feeling of being treated like G-d everywhere we went, in south africa and in the rest of the world, india, china, botswana, zimbabwe, america, etc etc.....wow that was too much comfort to give up!" The role and dialogue of Mylie Cyrus captures those very words spoken to me in the 1990's when I joined the dominant professional white working force. They would say, "so we felt helpless, and we couldn't say anything, even to each other, within our families, that what we were doing was against the word of G-d". They said, "so we quietly continued our bahaviour, and pretended as if we didn't understand why the ANC and people of color were so upset when they were sidelined for jobs, or grad school, or CEO positions etc etc., or received poorer grades at high school to hold them back from university entrance." I am an outlier who defied these prejudices, government policies and I burned the midnight oil and got my university degrees. Now I can read, pay taxes, think and write this review. Maybe it can help your evolving thoughts about power and leadership in the world today. Woody Allen, you prompted these memories from my memoirs and I feel a healing to share my OPINIONS here - Woody, YOU SEE THE INJUSTICE and I'm grateful that you actioned your conscience - it's a start to heal the world with this recognition. People like myself pray, we are change agents believing that G-d and conscience preys on our patience and so we change ourselves first to love and practice equality for all, as we go about our daily lives, living as evolved souls walking around mediocrity.
One person found this helpful
Amazon CustomerReviewed in the United States on October 7, 2016
4.0 out of 5 stars
This isn't his best work.
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For starters, you should probably know, I'm a Woody Allen apologist. That being said, this isn't his best work... and it might even be some of his worst, especially if you are judging it as a whole project. Which brings me to my next point, there are some really funny scenes and good ideas scattered throughout this series, and that's solely what I pulled out of it.

* Tiny spoilers ahead

I'm not an expert, so I won't try to diagnose the precise failings of this piece, but I will say, I got a sense that if the show had a single setup episode and then went straight into what was happening in the fifth and sixth episode, I may have liked it more. I found that once Woody Allen's character was forced into the caper I was much more engrossed in what was happening. But being that it wasn't like that, I found that it was too little, too late. Also, I should add that some of the concepts were good in concept, but were not handled gracefully. I really like the idea of a book club full of marxist 80 year old's, but it didn't entirely work... It did at times, but that's not a good excuse, because Woody Allen has really pulled off far more amazing concepts in the past... A prime example being in "Everyone Says I Love you" when we find out that being a republican is a disorder associated to not getting enough oxygen to the brain...

I really like Woody Allen, but I would only recommend this show to people who know that they like his work, with an understanding that it's a lesser piece, and that it's somewhat rehashed, and that he has a body of work to view that is more stimulating, better handled, and more funny.
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