Dead Zone

 (379)
7.32002TV-14
Based on the characters and story from the best-selling book by Stephen King, THE DEAD ZONE is a unique psychological thriller that combines a rich mix of action, the paranormal and a continuing quest for justice.
Starring
Anthony Michael Hall
Genres
Science FictionSuspenseDramaFantasy
Subtitles
English [CC]
Audio languages
English

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  1. 1. Wheel of Fortune
    June 15 2002
    42min
    7+
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    After six years in a coma following a near-fatal car accident, Johnny Smith awakens to find he has the gift of second sight and uses his psychic powers to help solve a serial murder case.
  2. 2. What It Seems
    June 22 2002
    44min
    7+
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    Johnny (Anthony Michael Hall) uses his psychic powers to help solve a serial murder case.
  3. 3. Quality of Life
    June 29 2002
    44min
    7+
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    Johnny Smith gains trust in his powers after they enable him to save a star high school athlete from a life-threatening heart condition.
  4. 4. Enigma
    July 6 2002
    44min
    7+
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    In helping an old man find his long lost love, Johnny Smith falls in love with the woman himself through visions he has of her in her youth.
  5. 5. Unreasonable Doubt
    July 13 2002
    44min
    7+
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    Johnny Smith is called to serve on a jury and uses his powers to uncover the real facts in the case.
  6. 6. The House
    July 20 2002
    44min
    7+
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    Johnny Smith experiences disturbing visions in his home that lead him to discover the truth about his mother's death.
  7. 7. Enemy Mind
    July 27 2002
    43min
    7+
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    While trying to rescue a runaway teen, Johnny Smith is exposed to mind-altering drugs that have a uniquely adverse effect on his brain.
  8. 8. Netherworld
    August 3 2002
    43min
    7+
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    Struck with a vision of a fiery explosion, Johnny Smith must distinguish between his dream world and reality in order to prevent a disaster.
  9. 9. The Siege
    August 10 2002
    44min
    7+
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    Johnny Smith attempts to manipulate the events during a hostage situation in a bank but each time he makes a move, the ending changes for the worse.
  10. 10. Here There Be Monsters
    August 17 2002
    44min
    7+
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    Johnny Smith's life is threatened when he's charged with witchcraft in a small New England town.
  11. 11. Dinner with Dana
    August 24 2002
    44min
    7+
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    Things heat up between Johnny Smith and Dana Bright, the news reporter who's been hounding him since he woke up, during a pretend date she plans to use as the basis for a cover story.
  12. 12. Shaman
    September 7 2002
    44min
    7+
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    Johnny Smith's visions reach across time when he joins forces with a psychic Native American Shaman from centuries past to avert a major disaster.
  13. 13. Destiny
    September 14 2002
    44min
    7+
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    When Johnny Smith's prediction of a tragic fire comes true, the incident brings him unwanted media coverage, as well as the attention of Greg Stillson, a very ambitious young candidate for congress.

More details

Directors
Robert Lieberman
Season year
2002
Network
USA Network
Purchase rights
Stream instantly Details
Format
Prime Video (streaming online video)
Devices
Available to watch on supported devices

Other formats

Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars

379 global ratings

  1. 76% of reviews have 5 stars
  2. 12% of reviews have 4 stars
  3. 8% of reviews have 3 stars
  4. 2% of reviews have 2 stars
  5. 3% of reviews have 1 stars
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Top reviews from the United States

Deitra WeddReviewed in the United States on January 20, 2016
5.0 out of 5 stars
a girlfriend that he loves even more and what looks to be a bright and happy future ahead of him
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Johnny Smith (Anthony Michael Hall) has everything he could ever want: a job that he loves, a girlfriend that he loves even more and what looks to be a bright and happy future ahead of him. However, one night is all it takes to change everything. After being in a coma for eight years, Johnny wakes up to find his girlfriend, Sarah (Nicole de Boer), is no longer his and his own son doesn’t know who he is. He also discovers the added bonus of being able to see visions of the past and future. It seems that the dead zone in his brain is suddenly active as a result of the damage caused to his brain before going in a coma and suddenly Johnny’s world has been turned upside down. Now he must use his newly acquired visions to help people but controlling the future isn’t as easy as it sounds. One little change and suddenly a big change in the future can occur, but not always for the best. Johnny struggles with becoming the hero the world wants him to be and his newly acquired fame, wishing he could go back to his nice, quiet, vision free life and trying not to imagine what if, while at the same time trying to keep the people he cares about safe as well as the rest of the world. He also has to try to keep himself out of a body bag.
3 people found this helpful
JP FishReviewed in the United States on October 17, 2018
5.0 out of 5 stars
True to the original novel, to a point.
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As a TV show is concerned, this treatment is top notch. After watching this first season I viewed the original 1983 movie adaptation of the novel. I was happily surprised as to how true the series is to the novel. Of course, the way the stories are written they fit between the events of the first and last half of the movie. I find this quite exiting because there are so many more episodes in the following seasons that things will obviously go in a different and hopefully a better direction. The cast is terrific and the writing is spellbinding. This is a Must See series for fans of the more unusual TV stories. I passed it up for far too long. Now I am completely hooked.
One person found this helpful
Wayne C. RogersReviewed in the United States on March 27, 2007
4.0 out of 5 stars
May all your zones be live ones!!!
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When the pilot for The Dead Zone television series was aired a few years ago, I remember watching a little bit of it and not being overly impressed. Of course, I've seen the movie with Christopher Walken about twenty times, and it was difficult for me to imagine anyone else taking over the role of Johnny Smith. Add to that the fact that Anthony Michael Hall was doing the lead, and you'll understand why I threw my hands up in the air in frustration, lamenting to myself on how TV screws up everything it touches by Stephen King. I mean I still see Hall as the young, dorky teenager in The Breakfast Club. Well, all I have to say is shame on me. Anyway, I just purchased the pilot TV movie and the first four seasons of The Dead Zone. I wanted to give Anthony Michael Hall and the show another chance, and I'm glad I did. Though I had some problems with the pilot and the changes that had been made from the novel (for example, when Johnny wakes up from his coma, he discovers that Sarah is married to Sheriff Bannerman and that his mother is already dead and that she'd remarried while he was in a comma to the good Reverend Purdy, who's now Johnny's step-father and guardian), I still found myself enjoying it. It took me a while to stop seeing Christopher Walken as Johnny and to accept Anthony Michael Hall in the role, but the important thing is that I did. It's the episodes of the first season, however, that really grabbed me. I gradually accepted the changes that had been made and got into the flow of the characters and what was happening to them.

Though this isn't evident in the description of the first season's boxed set, the TV pilot movie is included in this as the first two episodes. If I'd known that, I wouldn't have purchased the pilot movie separately. Now with regards to the other eleven episodes, some of them work better than others, but all of the shows are good. There's one episode where a down-on-his-luck electrician decides to rob the local bank. Sarah's cashing a check in the bank when the robbery goes down. Johnny has a vision in which he sees everyone in the bank dying when the police try to take out the robber. He decides to enter the bank and to see if he can change the outcome. What made this particular episode so good was Stephen Miller, who plays the electrician. He gives his character heart and soul, and before the show is over, you not only understand what's he going through, but you're also hoping that he won't be killed. In another episode an elderly man (Arty) sees a young woman in New York City who looks just like his long-lost fiancé (Abby), whom he never saw again after World War II. The man begs Johnny to check it out, and in the visions that Johnny later has, he travels back to the beginning of the war and meets the woman that Arty was so in love with. Elizabeth Ann Bennett plays Abby, and once you see her, you clearly understand why Arty loved her so much. She's the type of woman that any man would fall in love with. I guess you could say that she kind of stole my heart, too. In still another episode, Johnny travels to what I can only describe as a parallel universe and sees what it would've been like if he'd never been in the car accident and had married Sarah. It's almost heartbreaking because Johnny doesn't know which life is the real one. There's one episode that I couldn't quite buy. In it, Johnny and his friend, Bruce, stop in a small town to get something to eat. A murder has just taken place the night before and a young girl is still missing. There are satanic overtones to the murder. When Johnny offers to help the police solve the case, the town's people begin think that he's the killer because of his psychic ability and want to literally burn him at the stake. I had trouble with the premise of a town of supposedly rational people being manipulated into murdering someone by a few crazy individuals. I will say that the final episode, which introduces Greg Stillson to the audience, accomplishes what it was meant to do. It hooks you and then makes you want to immediately watch the second season. That's why I took a big chance and got all four seasons at one time. If I enjoyed season one, I didn't want to have to wait two-to-three weeks to get the next boxed set.

All in all, the majority of the episodes in season one are pretty good. There's humor, suspense, and a lot of heart that makes you care about the individual characters. The regulars who support Anthony Michael Hall all do an excellent job in their roles. I've grown to like Nicole DeBoer, who plays Sarah. I kept seeing Brooke Adams in the role from the original movie for a while. Chris Bruno does a good job of playing Sheriff Bannerman, who's a person that is caught between the woman he loves and the man that she still loves, while growing to depend on Johnny for his help in solving many of the cases that come up. John L. Adams, who plays Johnny's physical therapist and close friend, is also his sounding board and the origin for a lot of the humor that takes place in the series. Last, but not least, is Kirsten Dalton, who plays the sultry redheaded newspaper reporter that's a threat to Sarah and her relationship with Johnny. All the episodes have commentaries, and at the end of each disc, there's a behind-the-scenes featurette that deals with such things as the making of the show, its guest stars, and its visual effects and music. If you're a Stephen King fan and haven't yet watched this television series, then you owe it to yourself to either buy, or rent, the first season and to check it out for yourself. I think you'll find yourself hooked like I did.
11 people found this helpful
RMurray847Reviewed in the United States on August 2, 2007
5.0 out of 5 stars
A hugely entertaining series!
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I came pretty late to this series. My wife and I were looking for something to watch in the evenings of summer, when regular TV REALLY stinks. Not having cable, we've often resorted to picking up box sets, and have thoroughly enjoyed binging on shows as varied as SIX FEET UNDER and THE 4400.

So we gave THE DEAD ZONE a try, and have really loved it. We're both huge fans of the original book and the terrific movie with Christopher Walken. But this Dead Zone is not really THAT Dead Zone...and that's okay. Many of the events (particularly in the Pilot) are from King's version...but they are not building to the tragic ending of the book...they are used to setup the ONGOING story of Johnny Smith the "Reluctant Psychic."

In many ways, the show reminds me of X-FILES. It deals with supernatural (or at least unusual) happenings, with most episodes pretty much serving as stand-alone stories. Yet we also see the main characters evolve, and there is also an underlying "Mythology" of sorts that comes back from time to time. The ongoing story is hardly as complex as X-FILES...but it does give the series an underlying feeling of dread. I'm speaking the story line involving Smith and his relationship with an ultra-conservative church run by a minister who may or may not have Johnny's best interests in mind and a candidate for congress (Greg Stillson, also a character in King's book, but more fleshed out here). Season 1 just begins to touch on the Stillson story, but Johnny and the minister (David Ogden Stiers) have a lot of business.

Anyway, there are lots of interpersonal dynamics that get played out during the course of the psychic visions Johnny has and feels compelled to act upon. What I really like is that the show never got predicatable. I would say EVERY episode had us saying..."Wow, that was a different spin" or "that was creative." The show never seems to coast or rest on any laurels. (This continues at least through the end of Season 2 as well...that's as far as we've watched so far.) The creativity is boundless.

Anthony Michael Hall plays Johnny, and while he is not an obvious choice for the role, he makes it his own. His Johnny is quiet and just a touch unfriendly at times. But he never shirks his responsibility, and he has a sly sense of humor which lightens his dark demeanor just enough. Hall doesn't exactly give an Emmy-caliber performance...but he's solid and likeable and BELIEVABLE. That's so important.

Everyone else in the cast is adequate. The actor who plays Smith's therapist and friend Bruce is the best...with good energy and a light touch. Johnny's former girlfriend (and mother of his child) Sarah tends to be a slightly annoying character and the actress playing her doesn't dig deep enough to show us the pain we should be seeing. The actor playing Sarah's husband, Sheriff Walt Bannerman is sometimes not quite up to the emotional work he's asked to do...but he is very likeable and comes across convincingly as a solid, upright, trustworthy guy. It makes me realize how we often don't see folks like this in TV shows. He's also torn by jealousy over what Sarah and Johnny once had...but also realizes that Johnny deserves a part in the lives of his family and that Johnny has also helped make his job a lot easier. He's Johnny's #1 advocate whenever the inevitable doubter comes in...first to stick up for the guy who is causing him a lot of emotional anguish.

Anyway, I hope you get the idea that this is a rich show. Good, inventive stories and solid characters. It's made for cable, so the special effects aren't flashy (and the show almost never pushes for more than it can do convincingly...that makes me so happy!). For the most part, this is a family friendly show...except for one episode where Johnny has a particularly funny but mildly graphic one-night stand. If you're letting younger kids watch...just read the episode descriptions beforehand, and you'll easily spot the one I'm talking about.

It's a good show, and quite simply, I highly recommend it.
6 people found this helpful
Amazonian75Reviewed in the United States on January 13, 2007
5.0 out of 5 stars
Re-discovering the Dead Zone
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The collapse of the Star Trek Television franchise left fans, like myself, looking for something new in Sci-fi. Where to turn, but logically to the exodus of writers and producers that were weined on that show and have now turned their creative talents to re-invigorating sci-fi television elsewhere. Ronald D. Moore went on to successfully re-create "Battlestar Galactica", Brannon Braga became the executive producer on the short-lived, but nonetheless thrilling, "Threshold", and Michael Piller, along with his son Shawn, adapted Stephen King's Dead Zone novel for television. My reason for "getting into" the Dead Zone is simply, Michael Piller, arguably the best Star Trek writer to come out of its television franchise. Included in the Dead Zone's first season are episodes written by Michael and Shawn Piller (formerly of Star Trek:The Next Generation, Deep Space Nine, Voyager), as well as a few by Joe Menosky (also a former writer on Star Trek: The Next Generation), who serves as executive consultant on "the Dead Zone". Ironically, Dead Zone writer Michael Taylor is now penning episodes for Ronald D. Moore's "Battlestar Galactica." Check out Season Two for an episode by former Star Trek: DS9 writer Robert H. Wolfe.
If you were a fan of the later Star Trek series, you might want to check this show out. It has the suspense, drama, mystery and humanity that made me a loyal Trek fan for years. The Matrix-style visual effects are cutting edge/state of the art. As for the sci-fi element, there are no space battles, aliens, cool-looking robots, or space ships, but Johnny's ability to see into the past and future give him the perspective of a time traveler, while leaving him the human ability of only being able to change the future from the present.
5 people found this helpful
A. HudsonReviewed in the United States on February 13, 2017
5.0 out of 5 stars
The Dead Zone - The Complete First Season
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Really liked this series when it was on TV. Different from other series. Bought this one for a relative who has enjoyed it. The first season includes the pilot episode so anyone interested will not have to buy it separately. The beginning two or three seasons are always the best with any series and that is true here. Approximately 3rd season it begins to go into Armageddon, end of the world storylines, which made it less interesting to me. It only touches on that some and still has some of the storylines I prefer. I like the human interest storylines where Johnny uses his "gift" to help/save people and the ones depicting his complicated life since coming out of the coma. Someone that likes something different will probably like this series. A more current series that is similar is Saving Hope (2012 to present).
Lawrance BernaboReviewed in the United States on January 31, 2004
5.0 out of 5 stars
Stephen King's novel is turned into a pretty good TV series
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Of all of Stephen King's novels "The Dead Zone" is probably the one has the strongest potential for being turned into a television series, mainly on the strength of the character of Johnny Smith. Many years after being adapted into a theatrical film, in which I thought Christopher Walken was miscast as Johnny, we have a television series based on King's novel, starring Anthony Michael Hall, that finally gives us something to replace "Quantum Leap" and "Morning Edition" among cult television fans.
Created by the father and son team of Michael and Shawn Piller, there are several significant changes and additions to "The Dead Zone" premise: (1) The night of his accident Johnny and his fiancée Sara (Nicole de Boer) conceived a child, so when Johnny comes out of his coma this time, he learns more shocking news than Sara being married. (2) Sara is now married to Sheriff Walt Bannerman (Chris Buno), another character from the original novel, who is now given a more prominent role. (3) Johnny now has a sidekick in Bruce Lewis (John L. Adams), who starts off as his physical therapist and becomes a confidant, true-believer, and good friend. (4) In this version Johnny's father died when he was young and his mother (Anna Hagen), now a wealthy woman, died while he was in the coma. The bulk of her state has gone to the Reverend Gene Purdy (David Ogden Stiers), who has used it to fund his religious organization. This plays off of Vera Smith's fundamentalist beliefs in the novel, but gives the whole idea of the spiritual significance of Johnny's "gift" to the Reverend. (5) The other key supporting character is reporter Dana Bright (Kristen Dalton), who not only becomes a true believer but is interested in Johnny romantically as well. Consequently, Johnny has a much stronger support group in the television series. Once Sheriff Bannerman becomes a true believer that helps to eliminate the tired element of Johnny having to convince skeptics he is not a lunatic. (6) Finally, Greg Stillson (Sean Patrick Flanery), Johnny's ultimate antagonist in the novel, does not pop up until the 13th and final episode of the first season, setting up what will be the main conflict of season two.
If there is a fundamental flaw to the series it is that it is pretty much impossible to come up with a "normal" episode for the series. "Quality of Life" would be one such episode, where Johnny takes a job as an assistant hockey coach, touches a kid, and knows that he is going to drop dead on the ice if he keeps playing. Of course, nobody wants to believe him. Fortunately "The Dead Zone" is one of those relatively new fangled series like "The Sopranos" and "Six Feet Under" where a full season is a dozen episodes, so that the series is not overwhelmed by more and more tales stretching the limits of Johnny's power (e.g., "Shaman").
The best episode of the first season is "The Siege," where Sara is caught in a bank robbery and Johnny joins the hostages in an effort to figure out the shifting jigsaw puzzle and come up with an ending where everybody gets out alive. This one does a nice job of exploring the consequences of various actions. "Here There Be Monsters," where Johnny ends up being charged with practicing witchcraft when he tries to help another sheriff's office solve a murder. The twist here is that Johnny is in danger because people DO believe he can do what he claims. "Unreasonable Doubt" is clearly inspired by "Twelve Angry Men," but also does a nice job of exploring how Johnny can convince people of the validity of his visions. Stylistically the television series takes the idea from the original film version of putting Johnny into his visions as a spectator and give it some "Matrix" like effects: often a scene freezes and Johnny is able to walk through it to see what needs to be seen. The show also shows a pretty good sense of humor at times, as in "Dinner with Dana," where physical contact brings into the bedroom their previous lovers. At the core of the series is Hall's performance, and while I think his characterization is significantly different from the novel in that Johnny is no longer a tortured Hamlet of doubt, I also think that such a main character would not work for a television series. Instead Hall's Johnny Smith is reserved but still willing to do what has to be done, no doubt helped by the strong support group he has in this series.
The season finale, "Destiny," introduces candidate Stillson and returns the series to the last remaining element of the novel. This is a Stillson who is aware of Johnny's abilities, which will make quite a difference in the second season, and who is affiliated with the Reverend Purdy. It was nice to see the series go back to Cathy's episode from the novel, but there was one significant goof: Walt joins Johnny in trying to convince the owner of the restaurant to close down, and while they are unsuccessful, there is no way in the world that Walt does not somebody there watching the place (although given how quickly firetrucks seem to be there we might be missing something). This final episode also gets back to the heart of the novel, with Purdy explicitly talking about how Johnny is clearly destined to do something important, and that each of these episodes is just another link in the chain towards that greater glory. For a first season, often the most problematic in the history of a series, "The Dead Zone" is pretty good. More importantly, the show successfully builds on this solid foundation in the second season.
22 people found this helpful
mcladya65Reviewed in the United States on January 18, 2009
2.0 out of 5 stars
Got the 1st season but.....
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[[ASIN:B000092T3Y The Dead Zone - The Complete First Season]]

Just to give you an FYI. I got the 1st season of Dead Zone with the booklet that goes with it, but to my disapointment, it had 2nd season discs in the box set. When I went to check the lineup for the 1st episode online for the 1st season, it should have the title "Wheel of Fortune", that's the one when Johnny wakes up from his coma, and not "Valley of the Shadow" (from 2nd season / 1st episode). And the 1st season should have 4 discs in the box set not 6. I don't know how a box set titled for first season got mixed up with second season discs in this set. Who dropped the ball on this one when the box set was made? I am making arrangements to return it because I have the second season box set (black box) that I ordered from another vendor via this website. Heads up to the vendors: double check your packages and your info before sending them out to your customers. But be prepared to prep up refunds and returns.

Thank you,
Andrea A
6 people found this helpful
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