Follow the Stars Home

 (439)
7.21 h 38 min2001PG
After Dianne becomes pregnant, routine tests reveal that the child will suffer severe genetic defects. Dianne's husband decides that having a disabled child is not something he can bear and leaves. She decides to keep the baby.
Directors
Dick Lowry
Genres
Drama
Subtitles
English [CC]
Audio languages
English

Included with Hallmark Movies Now on Amazon for $5.99/month after trial

Add to Watchlist
Add to
Watchlist
By ordering or viewing, you agree to our Terms. Sold by Amazon.com Services LLC.
Write review

More details

Rating
PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)
Purchase rights
Stream instantly Details
Format
Prime Video (streaming online video)
Devices
Available to watch on supported devices

Other formats

Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars

439 global ratings

  1. 90% of reviews have 5 stars
  2. 6% of reviews have 4 stars
  3. 2% of reviews have 3 stars
  4. 2% of reviews have 2 stars
  5. 0% of reviews have 1 stars
Sorted by:

Top reviews from the United States

KittyReviewed in the United States on May 2, 2018
5.0 out of 5 stars
Excellent movie. I'm the mother of a profoundly handicapped ...
Verified purchase
Excellent movie. I'm the mother of a profoundly handicapped little girl who only lived to be three years old. This movie is really spot on about everything it talks about. Out marriage didn't last long after she died and many thought it was the stress of caring for your only child, knowing that she was only on this earth for a very short time. But I'm very grateful for the time we had to spend together. I am richer for it and have never regretted having her. This movie was very good at portraying all of the emotions and events of that time. It amazes me that the actors could portray the story with such realism, never having experienced the situation. I, for one, am very grateful they made this movie.
25 people found this helpful
Becki MerrittReviewed in the United States on February 20, 2015
5.0 out of 5 stars
Follow the Stars Home
Verified purchase
A good story from Hallmark and one that many can probably relate to in making wrong choices in relationships. Sometimes the wrong choices are right ones for proving the strength and love people have for each other. For 6 years Diane defends her absentee husband and the father of their completely handicap daughter whom he has never seen. Her actions makes the man who really loves her remain in the shadows. The birth defects don't take away all of life's essentials for Julia as she is able to have a friend to tell stories to and share her deepest secrets with. Diane finally gets it right in providing herself with a good husband and her daughter in her final months with the best father she could ever have. Good story well performed. Kimberly Williams-Paisley and Cambell Scott are good together.
9 people found this helpful
SarahReviewed in the United States on May 25, 2008
4.0 out of 5 stars
Formulaic tearjerker, but a heartwarming one
Verified purchase
Follow the Stars Home, based on the book of the same name by Luanne Rice, is the story of Dianne (Kimberly Williams), a young woman in love with handsome sailor Mark McCune (Eric Close). The two begin a whirlwind courtship and marriage, but when Dianne discovers that the baby she is carrying will be born with severe neurological and physical disabilities, Mark walks out, leaving Dianne to raise Julia (Amanda and Caitlin Fein) alone, with only her mother to help her.

Mark's brother David (Campbell Scott), a doctor, offers to help Dianne raise Julia by providing medical checkups and support, and is worried about Dianne's health as sole caretaker. Meanwhile, Amy (Alexa Vega, Spy Kids) a girl from a troubled home, becomes a "mother's helper" to Dianne and her mother.

The rest of the film plays out as a more-or-less formulaic story, with the prerequisite dose of angst, guilt, hospital visits, abusive boyfriends, and self-pity thrown in, before the (anticlimactic) conclusion. However, Dianne fails to fall into the "martyred mother of a handicapped child" camp. I personally know several acquaintances who have handicapped children (one has a daughter with lissencephaly who is nonverbal, cannot sit up, crawl, or roll over, and has multiple seizures every day), and Dianne's steadfast devotion to Julia at the expense of her own health (and occasionally happiness) rings true. It takes a great deal of courage and love to be a lifetime caretaker of a severely handicapped child, and Kimberly Williams' portrayal was one of the best things about the movie.

Mark's role as the now-you-see-him, now-you-don't ex was less successful; his limited dialogue doesn't really allow much in the way of character development, and his subsequent appearances felt forced and unnecessary. David fares better as the loyal "fifth wheel" whose feelings for Dianne are largely ignored throughout most of the movie, yet he still gives his time to help Julia. Stage actress Blair Brown as Hannah, Dianne's mother, brought a degree of strength and wisdom that served as a direct counterpoint to Amy's drunken mother Tess (Roxanne Hart).

Follow the Stars Home is generally family-friendly, with the exception of Tess's physically abusive boyfriend (there is a scene involving animal cruelty as well as physical violence towards a child). However, the slow pace and adult plot will likely bore younger audiences.

Overall, this was a decent enough love story about mothers and daughters, second chances, and learning to trust that should appeal to fans of the original novel, and fits in well with the usual Hallmark Hall of Fame demographic.
11 people found this helpful
KittyKinsReviewed in the United States on August 31, 2002
5.0 out of 5 stars
A Good Family Film With A Positive Message
Verified purchase
Based on the novel by Luanne Rice, this positive family film deals with some hard issues: abortion, childhood disability, single parenting, grieving the death of a spouse and father, domestic violence, and substance abuse. That doesn't sound like a great mix for family entertainment, but although realistic, it is tastefully done. It is also is completely clean without swearing and doesn't dwell on the unhappy scenes. It has some good messages with a happy ending, and all the loose ends are nicely resolved. Probably the main theme of the story is the value of human life, but also that when you truly love someone you are willing to give of yourself.
Dianne Parker (Kimberly Williams) and Mark McCune (Eric Close) marry and are expecting their first child. When they find out that their unborn child will be severely disabled, Mark urges Dianne to have an abortion. She refuses and Mark abandons the family leaving her to be a single parent. Mark's brother, David (Campbell Scott), is a friend of Dianne's who has been secretly in love with her since before she was married to his brother. He is conveniently a pediatrician and is a great help to Dianne. Worried for Dianne's heath because she is overworking herself, he arranges for Amy (Alexa Vega) to work as a mother's helper over the summer. Amy has a very bad home situation and her mother is an alcoholic. Amy develops a strong friendship with Julia, Dianne's daughter, to the point where they can almost read each other's minds.
This movie has superb acting by all the cast, especially young Alexa Vega and Kimberly Williams. Alexa really steals the show! I also noticed that twin girls (Amanda & Caitlin Fein) play the part of Julia. If they are not disabled (and even if they are) they did some pretty good acting. The most disturbing scenes are those that involve Amy's mother's abusive boyfriend, especially the one in which he tries to kill Amy's puppy. It all turns out okay, but parents should be warned that it is pretty frightening. It is also disturbing when Julia has seizures and children may need some explanation before viewing the film. Amy's mother gets help and we realize by the end that Amy and her mother will have a good future together.
I would strongly recommend this movie, but better get out the Kleenexes before the climax! Oh, and the ending is just so cute.
Additional note: The DVD is pretty basic and does not have much in the way of additional features.
23 people found this helpful
KittyKinsReviewed in the United States on September 12, 2002
5.0 out of 5 stars
A Good Family Film With a Positive Message
Verified purchase
Based on the novel by Luanne Rice, this positive family film deals with some hard issues: abortion, childhood disability, single parenting, grieving the death of a spouse and father, domestic violence, and substance abuse. That doesn't sound like a great mix for family entertainment, but although realistic, it is tastefully done. It is also is completely clean without swearing and doesn't dwell on the unhappy scenes. It has some good messages with a happy ending, and all the loose ends are nicely resolved. Probably the main theme of the story is the value of human life, but also that when you truly love someone you are willing to give of yourself.
Dianne Parker (Kimberly Williams) and Mark McCune (Eric Close) marry and are expecting their first child. When they find out that their unborn child will be severely disabled, Mark urges Dianne to have an abortion. She refuses and Mark abandons the family leaving her to be a single parent. Mark's brother, David (Campbell Scott), is a friend of Dianne's who has been secretly in love with her since before she was married to his brother. He is conveniently a pediatrician and is a great help to Dianne. Worried for Dianne's heath because she is overworking herself, he arranges for Amy (Alexa Vega) to work as a mother's helper over the summer. Amy has a very bad home situation and her mother is an alcoholic. Amy develops a strong friendship with Julia, Dianne's daughter, to the point where they can almost read each other's minds.
This movie has superb acting by all the cast, especially young Alexa Vega and Kimberly Williams. Alexa really steals the show! I also noticed that twin girls (Amanda & Caitlin Fein) play the part of Julia. If they are not disabled (and even if they are) they did some pretty good acting. The most disturbing scenes are those that involve Amy's mother's abusive boyfriend, especially the one in which he tries to kill Amy's puppy. It all turns out okay, but parents should be warned that it is pretty frightening. It is also disturbing when Julia has seizures and children may need some explanation before viewing the film. Amy's mother gets help and we realize by the end that Amy and her mother will have a good future together.
A strong message in the film is the fact that although Julia's life will be cut short because of her serious medical condition, the 6 years that she has lived are not wasted, that both she and her mother have been changed as the result of her life.
I would strongly recommend this movie, but better get out the Kleenexes before the climax! Oh, and the ending is just so cute.
81 people found this helpful
TetsuReviewed in the United States on January 31, 2007
5.0 out of 5 stars
A very thoughtful and thought provoking film
Verified purchase
I've seen this movie several times. It was at the most recent viewing that several thoughts came to mind. I worked in a major medical center for several years and on occassion my clinic would see children who were severely disabled. I would think what kind of life were the kids and their parents having - spending many days in the hospital. I still don't know if I have an answer but the film has me thinking about it again. I can empathize with the husband not being able to deal with the catastrophy (from his viewpoint) of a disabled child. My ex-wife was diagnosed with a possible cancer (ultimately found to be not a cancer). When she was describing how she was feeling (very very scared) I didn't know what to say so ultimately just sat there like a dope and looked at her. Not my best performance as a husband. This movie brought that scene in my own life back very vividely. Watching the mom's helper after she had been injured in a car accident apologizing for not being able to take care of Julia and Julia's mom and her alcoholic mother brought back other memories of my alcoholic father and how at the age of 12 I was trying to figure out ways to make him not drink. I never did come up with a solution but seeing the torment in the child (who was apparently younger than me) brought the moments of over 40 years ago back to me. So for me, this movie was thought provoking on many issues about my own life. I'm not sure that this is a movie for everyone. Some have said it has a good ending. I'm not sure. There is a pending death and you won't if Amy's mom says sober. There are uncertainties in this movie just like in real life. But at the conclusion you are at least hopeful that things will work out ok for everyone. Ultimately this was a hard movie for me to watch but at the same time it was beneficial. The acting was exceptional and the feelings and emotions they all conveyed were easy to understand and feel. I recommend this movie highly but I'm not sure it is a movie that kids will easily understand. Parents should stand by for lots of questions which have very hard answers.
8 people found this helpful
KateyReviewed in the United States on August 5, 2010
5.0 out of 5 stars
Follow the Stars home
Verified purchase
I have seen this movie so many times on TV and loved it every time I watched it that I finally decided to buy it. It is a wonderful family drama with great actors and a great story that centers around two brothers, a woman they both love, and a child who is disabled. It is a wonderful movie that I would highly recommend to anyone. The characters in this movie are ones you either root for or you grow to hate, but they are real and passionate. I loved Kimberly Williams in this role and she plays it perfectly. Campbell Scott was fabulous in this movie with a character that you admire and love. I would highly recommend this movie to anyone. It is a great movie especially for anyone trying to understand what it would be like to have a disabled child and the struggles a mother goes through as well as the unconditional love of a mother for her child.
Marsha Lynn FraindReviewed in the United States on January 13, 2014
5.0 out of 5 stars
Good family film
Verified purchase
Based on the novel by Luanne Rice, this positive family film deals with some hard issues: abortion, childhood disability, single parenting, grieving the death of a spouse and father, domestic violence, and substance abuse. That doesn't sound like a great mix for family entertainment, but although realistic, it is tastefully done. It is also is completely clean without swearing and doesn't dwell on the unhappy scenes. It has some good messages with a happy ending, and all the loose ends are nicely resolved. Probably the main theme of the story is the value of human life, but also that when you truly love someone you are willing to give of yourself.
4 people found this helpful
See all reviews