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Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows by [J.K. Rowling]

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Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Kindle Edition

4.9 out of 5 stars 31,582 ratings

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Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com

Readers beware. The brilliant, breathtaking conclusion to J.K. Rowling's spellbinding series is not for the faint of heart--such revelations, battles, and betrayals await in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows that no fan will make it to the end unscathed. Luckily, Rowling has prepped loyal readers for the end of her series by doling out increasingly dark and dangerous tales of magic and mystery, shot through with lessons about honor and contempt, love and loss, and right and wrong. Fear not, you will find no spoilers in our review--to tell the plot would ruin the journey, and Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows is an odyssey the likes of which Rowling's fans have not yet seen, and are not likely to forget. But we would be remiss if we did not offer one small suggestion before you embark on your final adventure with Harry--bring plenty of tissues.

The heart of Book 7 is a hero's mission--not just in Harry's quest for the Horcruxes, but in his journey from boy to man--and Harry faces more danger than that found in all six books combined, from the direct threat of the Death Eaters and you-know-who, to the subtle perils of losing faith in himself. Attentive readers would do well to remember Dumbledore's warning about making the choice between "what is right and what is easy," and know that Rowling applies the same difficult principle to the conclusion of her series. While fans will find the answers to hotly speculated questions about Dumbledore, Snape, and you-know-who, it is a testament to Rowling's skill as a storyteller that even the most astute and careful reader will be taken by surprise.

A spectacular finish to a phenomenal series, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows is a bittersweet read for fans. The journey is hard, filled with events both tragic and triumphant, the battlefield littered with the bodies of the dearest and despised, but the final chapter is as brilliant and blinding as a phoenix's flame, and fans and skeptics alike will emerge from the confines of the story with full but heavy hearts, giddy and grateful for the experience. --Daphne Durham

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Begin at the Beginning
Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone

Hardcover
PaperbackHarry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets

Hardcover
PaperbackHarry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban

Hardcover
PaperbackHarry Potter and the Goblet of Fire

Hardcover
PaperbackHarry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix

Hardcover
PaperbackHarry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince

Hardcover
Paperback
Why We Love Harry
Favorite Moments from the Series
There are plenty of reasons to love Rowling's wildly popular series--no doubt you have several dozen of your own. Our list features favorite moments, characters, and artifacts from the first five books. Keep in mind that this list is by no means exhaustive (what we love about Harry could fill ten books!) and does not include any of the spectacular revelatory moments that would spoil the books for those (few) who have not read them. Enjoy.

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone
* Harry's first trip to the zoo with the Dursleys, when a boa constrictor winks at him.
* When the Dursleys' house is suddenly besieged by letters for Harry from Hogwarts. Readers learn how much the Dursleys have been keeping from Harry. Rowling does a wonderful job in displaying the lengths to which Uncle Vernon will go to deny that magic exists.
* Harry's first visit to Diagon Alley with Hagrid. Full of curiosities and rich with magic and marvel, Harry's first trip includes a trip to Gringotts and Ollivanders, where Harry gets his wand (holly and phoenix feather) and discovers yet another connection to He-Who-Must-No-Be-Named. This moment is the reader's first full introduction to Rowling's world of witchcraft and wizards.
* Harry's experience with the Sorting Hat.

Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets
* The de-gnoming of the Weasleys' garden. Harry discovers that even wizards have chores--gnomes must be grabbed (ignoring angry protests "Gerroff me! Gerroff me!"), swung about (to make them too dizzy to come back), and tossed out of the garden--this delightful scene highlights Rowling's clever and witty genius.
* Harry's first experience with a Howler, sent to Ron by his mother.
* The Dueling Club battle between Harry and Malfoy. Gilderoy Lockhart starts the Dueling Club to help students practice spells on each other, but he is not prepared for the intensity of the animosity between Harry and Draco. Since they are still young, their minibattle is innocent enough, including tickling and dancing charms.

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban
* Ron's attempt to use a telephone to call Harry at the Dursleys'.
* Harry's first encounter with a Dementor on the train (and just about any other encounter with Dementors). Harry's brush with the Dementors is terrifying and prepares Potter fans for a darker, scarier book.
* Harry, Ron, and Hermione's behavior in Professor Trelawney's Divination class. Some of the best moments in Rowling's books occur when she reminds us that the wizards-in-training at Hogwarts are, after all, just children. Clearly, even at a school of witchcraft and wizardry, classes can be boring and seem pointless to children.
* The Boggart lesson in Professor Lupin's classroom.
* Harry, Ron, and Hermione's knock-down confrontation with Snape.

Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
* Hermione's disgust at the reception for the veela (Bulgarian National Team Mascots) at the Quidditch World Cup. Rowling's fourth book addresses issues about growing up--the dynamic between the boys and girls at Hogwarts starts to change. Nowhere is this more plain than the hilarious scene in which magical cheerleaders nearly convince Harry and Ron to jump from the stands to impress them.
* Viktor Krum's crush on Hermione--and Ron's objection to it.
* Malfoy's "Potter Stinks" badge.
* Hermione's creation of S.P.E.W., the intolerant bigotry of the Death Eaters, and the danger of the Triwizard Tournament. Add in the changing dynamics between girls and boys at Hogwarts, and suddenly Rowling's fourth book has a weight and seriousness not as present in early books in the series. Candy and tickle spells are left behind as the students tackle darker, more serious issues and take on larger responsibilities, including the knowledge of illegal curses.

Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix

* Harry's outburst to his friends at No. 12 Grimmauld Place. A combination of frustration over being kept in the dark and fear that he will be expelled fuels much of Harry's anger, and it all comes out at once, directly aimed at Ron and Hermione. Rowling perfectly portrays Harry's frustration at being too old to shirk responsibility, but too young to be accepted as part of the fight that he knows is coming.
* Harry's detention with Professor Umbridge. Rowling shows her darker side, leading readers to believe that Hogwarts is no longer a safe haven for young wizards. Dolores represents a bureaucratic tyrant capable of real evil, and Harry is forced to endure their private battle of wills alone.
* Harry and Cho's painfully awkward interactions. Rowling clearly remembers what it was like to be a teenager.
* Harry's Occlumency lessons with Snape.
* Dumbledore's confession to Harry.

Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince

* The introduction of the Horcrux.
* Molly Weasley asking Arthur Weasley about his "dearest ambition." Rowling has always been great at revealing little intriguing bits about her characters at a time, and Arthurs answer "to find out how airplanes stay up" reminds us about his obsession with Muggles.
* Harry's private lessons with Dumbledore, and more time spent with the fascinating and dangerous pensieve, arguably one of Rowlings most ingenious inventions.
* Fred and George Weasleys Joke Shop, and the slogan: "Why Are You Worrying About You-Know-Who? You Should Be Worrying About U-NO-POO--the Constipation Sensation That's Gripping the Nation!"
* Luna's Quidditch commentary. Rowling created scores of Luna Lovegood fans with hilarious and bizarre commentary from the most unlikely Quidditch commentator.
* The effects of Felix Felicis.

Magic, Mystery, and Mayhem: A Conversation with J.K. Rowling

"I am an extraordinarily lucky person, doing what I love best in the world. Im sure that I will always be a writer. It was wonderful enough just to be published. The greatest reward is the enthusiasm of the readers." --J.K. Rowling

Find out more about Harry's creator in our exclusive interview with J.K. Rowling.



Did You Know?The Little White Horse was J.K. Rowling's favorite book as a child. a> Jane Austen is Rowling's favorite author. Roddy Doyle is Rowling's favorite living writer.

A Few Words from Mary GrandPré

"When I illustrate a cover or a book, I draw upon what the author tells me; that's how I see my responsibility as an illustrator. J.K. Rowling is very descriptive in her writing--she gives an illustrator a lot to work with. Each story is packed full of rich visual descriptions of the atmosphere, the mood, the setting, and all the different creatures and people. She makes it easy for me. The images just develop as I sketch and retrace until it feels right and matches her vision." Check out more Harry Potter art from illustrator Mary GrandPré.

--This text refers to the hardcover edition.

From Publishers Weekly

Starred Review. Potter fans, relax—this review packs no spoilers. Instead, we're taking advantage of our public platform to praise Rowling for the excellence of her plotting. We can't think of anyone else who has sustained such an intricate, endlessly inventive plot over seven thick volumes and so constantly surprised us with twists, well-laid traps and Purloined Letter-style tricks. Hallows continues the tradition, both with sly feats of legerdemain and with several altogether new, unexpected elements. Perhaps some of the surprises in Hallows don't have quite the punch as those of earlier books, but that may be because of the thoroughness and consistency with which Rowling has created her magical universe, and because we've so raptly absorbed its rules.

We're also seizing the occasion to wish out loud that her editors had done their jobs more actively. It's hard to escape the notion that the first three volumes were more carefully edited than the last four. Hallows doesn't contain the extraneous scenes found in, say, Goblet of Fire, but the momentum is uneven. Rowling is much better at comedy than at fight scenes, and no reader of the sixth book will be startled to hear that Hallows has little humor or that its characters engage in more than a few fights. Surely her editors could have helped her find other methods of building suspense besides the use of ellipses and dashes? And craft fight dialogue that sounds a bit less like it belongs in a comic book? Okay, we're quibbling. We know these minor nuisances won't dent readers' enjoyment, at least not this generation of readers; we couldn't put Hallows down ourselves. But we believe Rowling, and future readers, deserved even better. Ages 9-12. (July)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

--This text refers to an alternate kindle_edition edition.

Product details

  • ASIN ‏ : ‎ B019PIOJVI
  • Publisher ‏ : ‎ Pottermore Publishing (December 8, 2015)
  • Publication date ‏ : ‎ December 8, 2015
  • Language ‏ : ‎ English
  • File size ‏ : ‎ 3097 KB
  • Text-to-Speech ‏ : ‎ Enabled
  • Screen Reader ‏ : ‎ Supported
  • Enhanced typesetting ‏ : ‎ Enabled
  • X-Ray ‏ : ‎ Enabled
  • Word Wise ‏ : ‎ Enabled
  • Print length ‏ : ‎ 313 pages
  • Page numbers source ISBN ‏ : ‎ 140885595X
  • Lending ‏ : ‎ Not Enabled
  • Customer Reviews:
    4.9 out of 5 stars 31,582 ratings

About the author

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J.K. Rowling is best-known as the author of the seven Harry Potter books, which were published between 1997 and 2007. The enduringly popular adventures of Harry, Ron and Hermione have gone on to sell over 500 million copies, be translated into over 80 languages and made into eight blockbuster films.

Alongside the Harry Potter series, J.K. Rowling also wrote three short companion volumes for charity: Quidditch Through the Ages and Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, in aid of Comic Relief, and The Tales of Beedle the Bard, in aid of Lumos. The companion books and original series are all available as audiobooks.

In 2016, J.K. Rowling collaborated with playwright Jack Thorne and director John Tiffany to continue Harry’s story in a stage play, Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, which opened in London, followed by the USA and Australia.

In the same year, she made her debut as a screenwriter with the film Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them. Inspired by the original companion volume, it was the first in a series of new adventures featuring wizarding world magizoologist Newt Scamander. The second, Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald, was released in 2018 and the third, Fantastic Beasts: The Secrets of Dumbledore is to be released in April 2022.

Both the screenplays, as well as the script of Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, are also available as books.

Fans of Fantastic Beasts and Harry Potter can find out more at www.wizardingworld.com.

J.K. Rowling also writes novels for adults. The Casual Vacancy was published in 2012 and adapted for television in 2015. Under the pseudonym Robert Galbraith, she is the author of the highly acclaimed ‘Strike’ crime series, featuring private detective Cormoran Strike and his partner Robin Ellacott. The first of these, The Cuckoo’s Calling, was published to critical acclaim in 2013, at first without its author’s true identity being known. The Silkworm followed in 2014, Career of Evil in 2015 and Lethal White in 2018. All four books have been adapted for television by the BBC and HBO. The fifth book, Troubled Blood, is now out and was also an instant bestseller.

J.K. Rowling’s 2008 Harvard Commencement speech was published in 2015 as an illustrated book, Very Good Lives: The Fringe Benefits of Failure and the Importance of Imagination, sold in aid of Lumos and university-wide financial aid at Harvard.

In 2020, J.K. Rowling released in free online instalments, The Ickabog, an original fairy tale, which she wrote over ten years ago as a bedtime story for her younger children. She decided to share the personal family favourite to help entertain children, parents and carers confined at home during the Covid-19 lockdown.

The story is now published as a book (hardback, ebook and audio) in the English language, and is translated into 26 languages, each edition with its own unique illustrations by children. J.K. Rowling is donating her royalties from The Ickabog to her charitable trust, The Volant Charitable Trust, to assist vulnerable groups who have been particularly impacted by the Covid-19 pandemic in the UK and internationally.

J.K. Rowling’s latest children’s novel, The Christmas Pig, is out now. Illustrated by Jim Field, it’s the story of a little boy called Jack, and his beloved toy, Dur Pig, and the toy that replaces Dur Pig when he’s lost on Christmas Eve – the Christmas Pig. Together, Jack and the Christmas Pig embark on a magical journey to seek something lost, and to save the best friend Jack has ever known.

As well as receiving an OBE and Companion of Honour for services to children’s literature, J.K. Rowling has received many other awards and honours, including France’s Legion d’Honneur, Spain’s Prince of Asturias Award and Denmark’s Hans Christian Andersen Award.

www.jkrowling.com

Image: Photography Debra Hurford Brown © J.K. Rowling 2018

Customer reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
4.9 out of 5
31,582 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Reviewed in the United States on April 6, 2018
268 people found this helpful
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Reviewed in the United States on September 7, 2018
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Reviewed in the United States on March 31, 2018
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1.0 out of 5 stars Book was improperly printed, pages missing and in wrong order.
Reviewed in the United States on March 31, 2018
The book has a printing error where pages are missing and in the wrong order. At page 620, the next page is number 573. I've included images of the book where the error is. If you turn pages ahead, the pages repeat pages 573-620 again and then rejoin the proper page chronology at page 669. Also, pages 621-668 are completely missing so I can't even read them in a different section and finish the story. :/
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Reviewed in the United States on December 30, 2020
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Reviewed in the United States on July 20, 2019
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Reviewed in the United States on October 4, 2018
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2.0 out of 5 stars I love the series! However, the condition of the books were awful
Reviewed in the United States on October 4, 2018
I bought this book and The Half Blood Prince brand new. I received old, used, and very damaged books. I immediately contacted the seller and explained the books were very damaged, and I was sent two new books. The Half Blood Prince was fine, however the Deathly Hallows was very bent. I’m very disappointed because this is the first time I’m reading the series and I wanted aesthetically pleasing books for the collection. The story is absolutely amazing and I look forward to reading it, but still, the damage to the books make it look very unappealing.
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Reviewed in the United States on January 16, 2020
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Reviewed in the United States on October 27, 2018
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Djilly L.
5.0 out of 5 stars Hunting Horcruxes
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 19, 2019
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Djilly L.
5.0 out of 5 stars Hunting Horcruxes
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 19, 2019
It will be no surprise that you’ll find Harry severely challenged in this book with Lord Voldemort and the Death Eaters on his heels with the protective charm broken! - that has kept him safe until now There is no hiding as he is well aware that He-who-shall-not-be-named strikes fear into all aspects of Harry’s life. Not only must Harry the remaining Horcruxes and destroy them, there will be a final confrontation as well. Harry’s own potential death is keeps a happy-ending up in the air - either Harry or Voldemort had to die. The story line of the 607 page book has many exciting twists and turns, making the narrative far from predictable while tension builds up until the bloody battle at the end of the tale.
It’s also an great adventure, with the trio of friends hunting for horcruxes while trying to evade the Death Eaters. At the same time there is plenty of room for laughs and humour, the twins Fred and George Weasley for starters manage to keep it at least a little light hearted. The Deathly Hallows revisits key characters and places and from all of the previous six books with subtle references to previous events or dialogue from earlier books, making the read very enjoyable. Most of the loose ends planted in the previous books will be tied up.

All in all a great and worthy conclusion to the series in my view. I’ m very thankful for the books and for the tremendous magical world created by J.K. Rowling.
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13 people found this helpful
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John M
5.0 out of 5 stars A great conclusion to a fabulous series that has captivated a generation
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 27, 2018
7 people found this helpful
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Hermione
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book, odd cover
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 16, 2020
3 people found this helpful
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Jules
5.0 out of 5 stars Oh no last book, but well done Rowling!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 14, 2020
6 people found this helpful
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Miss K. M. Frame
3.0 out of 5 stars Deterioration
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 3, 2020
4 people found this helpful
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