Hawaii Five-O (Classic)

 (515)
7.419727+
In the show's fourth season, McGarrett and his team search for a serial killer who puts makeup on his victims; track a well-organized gang cashing fraudulent traveler's checks; and hunt down a disgruntled ex-cop plotting to assassinate the governor.
Starring
Jack LordJames MacArthurZulu
Genres
Drama
Subtitles
English [CC]
Audio languages
English

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  1. 1. Highest Castle, Deepest Grave
    September 14, 1971
    51min
    TV-PG
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    A ten-year-old missing persons case is reopened when the bodies of a man and a woman are found during an archeological dig and medical reports show the pair to have been murdered.
  2. 2. No Bottles... No Cans... No People
    September 21, 1971
    51min
    TV-PG
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    A small-time hoodlum tries to eliminate the competition and open the way for a mainland crime syndicate to operate in Hawaii. McGarrett and his Five-O team are assigned by the Attorney General's office to block the syndicate's operation and put the mobster out of business permanently.
  3. 3. Wednesday, Ladies Free
    September 28, 1971
    51min
    TV-PG
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    A strangler murders five women, leaving each wearing a blonde wig and their faces garishly made up. Monte Markham guest stars as Jerry Rhoades, a private investigator whose wife is among the victims, and who has joined McGarrett's search for the criminal. Together, they desperately work against time to find a link between the female victims and capture the killer before he strikes again.
  4. 4. 3,000 Crooked Miles to Honolulu
    October 5, 1971
    51min
    TV-PG
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    Buddy Ebsen guest stars as a cunning college professor who plots an elaborate scheme to cash $750,000 worth of stolen travelers checks. Operating under the guise of a legitimate tour guide, the professor sees his plans go awry when one of the tour members becomes ill, is murdered in his hospital bed, and McGarrett is called in to investigate.
  5. 5. Two Doves and Mr. Heron
    October 12, 1971
    51min
    TV-PG
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    Vic Morrow guest stars as Edward Heron, a tourist in Hawaii, who, after being mugged and hospitalized, becomes the object of McGarrett's suspicions when he refuses to press charges and disappears from the hospital. The mugger discovers he got more than he hoped for when he finds in Heron's wallet a key to a storage locker holding $250,000.
  6. 6. ...And I Want Some Candy and a Gun That Shoots
    October 19, 1971
    51min
    TV-PG
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    A psychotic sniper endangers the lives of motorists as he fires at cars from a hillside bunker overlooking a major highway. Five-O, aided by the Honolulu police department, employs every method to penetrate the sniper's seemingly impregnable position, and to take him alive and avoid any senseless bloodshed.
  7. 7. Air Cargo - Dial for Murder
    October 26, 1971
    51min
    TV-PG
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    McGarrett, while investigating the death of an airport security undercover agent, comes upon an air cargo hijacking ring. The case becomes more involved when another airport employee is found dead and over a quarter of a million dollars is discovered among his personal effects.
  8. 8. For a Million... Why Not?
    November 2, 1971
    51min
    TV-PG
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    Five upstanding citizens seek their own revenge through a criminal act -- the theft of $6 million. The precision and elaborate planning employed by the group make their scheme a seemingly perfect crime, even to the Five-O investigation team.
  9. 9. The Burning Ice
    November 9, 1971
    51min
    TV-PG
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    Jackie Cooper guest stars as Dr. Alex Southmore, who becomes a suspect in the investigation of his wife's murder when McGarrett finds holes in the confessed killer's story. McGarrett believes the murderer is still at large when he learns that the confessed killer was a conscientious objector in the Korean war and is a patient with a terminal illness in the hospital where Dr. Southmore practices.
  10. 10. Rest in Peace, Somebody
    November 16, 1971
    50min
    TV-PG
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    McGarrett receives calls and clues from a man saying he will kill somebody important in 48 hours. His only clue to the identity of the victim: a key sent by the anonymous assailant.
  11. 11. A Matter of Mutual Concern
    November 23, 1971
    51min
    TV-PG
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    McGarrett fears a gangland war is imminent when it seems a mainland syndicate is trying to take over criminal operations. Criminal operations up to this time have been under the control of four unfriendly families, and McGarrett expects trouble because he suspects them of having murdered the messenger sent by the mainland syndicate.
  12. 12. Nine, Ten, You're Dead
    November 30, 1971
    52min
    TV-PG
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    A syndicate boss seeks revenge when his light-heavyweight boxer's hand is smashed by a punchy ex-fighter. McGarrett and his Five-O team desperately search for the punchy attacker, not only to bring him to justice but also, to protect him from the mobster.
  13. 13. Is This Any Way to Run a Paradise?
    December 14, 1971
    51min
    TV-PG
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    McGarrett searches for an ecology fanatic whose pranks are harmless until he threatens the lives of those he feels are the cause of the island's pollution. The islanders are sympathetic to the prankster -- until he carries out his threat of murder.
  14. 14. Odd Man In
    December 28, 1971
    51min
    TV-PG
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    Hume Cronyn returns in a guest star appearance as Lewis Avery Filer, the criminal with a thousand faces, who escapes from the Oahu prison after devising a scheme to steal $4-million from drug smugglers. Filer, as in past crimes, taunts McGarrett with clues, but this time his plan includes having McGarrett help him rather than hinder him.
  15. 15. Bait Once, Bait Twice
    January 4, 1972
    51min
    TV-PG
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    A young woman is forced to fake a suicide attempt so that her fiancée' will come out of hiding -- a gambling czar wants him dead.
  16. 16. The Ninety-Second War: Part I
    January 11, 1972
    51min
    TV-PG
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    A powerful unknown source sets up an elaborate scheme to frame McGarrett as a thief.
  17. 17. The Ninety-Second War: Part II
    January 18, 1972
    51min
    TV-PG
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    McGarrett learns that communist agent Wo Fat needs 90 seconds in order to carry out his plot against a U.S. missile tracking base.
  18. 18. Skinhead
    January 25, 1972
    50min
    TV-PG
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    A young Hawaiian girl is assaulted in a parking lot and a braggart soldier is arrested and tried for the crime. The soldier is found guilty, but a fact in his medical history leads McGarrett to believe the wrong man may have been convicted.
  19. 19. While You're at It, Bring in the Moon
    February 1, 1972
    50min
    TV-PG
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    Barry Sullivan guest stars as an eccentric billionaire suspected of killing one of his business associates, but who is afraid to leave his antiseptic yacht even to clear himself of the crime.
  20. 20. Cloth of Gold
    February 8, 1972
    51min
    TV-PG
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    Members of a not-too-legitimate real estate company become victims of a poison contained in a rare shellfish. McGarrett knows that the two men were murdered, but is stumped by the origin of the poison and how it was administered to the victims.
  21. 21. Good Night, Baby - Time to Die
    February 15, 1972
    51min
    TV-PG
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    A convicted murderer escapes from prison and threatens to kill his former girl friend, so McGarrett sets up an elaborate police protective system around the girl in an effort to capture the killer.
  22. 22. Didn't We Meet at a Murder?
    February 22, 1972
    50min
    TV-PG
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    A wealthy young widow is one of the victims in an intricate blackmail plot that leads to the murder of a Chicago mobster. During the investigation, McGarrett discovers the blackmail scheme and a plot to rob a Hawaiian bank.
  23. 23. Follow the White Brick Road
    February 29, 1972
    51min
    TV-PG
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    Danny Williams goes undercover as a sailor to flush out a drug ring operating from a vessel in the U.S. Seventh Fleet. The Five-O team and Naval Intelligence have only a few days before the ship lands in Pearl Harbor to find the drug pushers and the kilo of heroin rumored to be aboard the ship.
  24. 24. R & R & R
    March 7, 1972
    51min
    TV-PG
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    McGarrett seeks a killer whose targets have been wives of army men who have come to Hawaii to meet their husbands on furlough. A break in the case comes when one of the wives receives a wire to meet her husband in Honolulu, but McGarrett learns that her husband had been killed in action prior to the sending of the telegram.

More details

Directors
Charles DubinMichael O'HerlihyJerry ThorpeRon WinstonPaul StanleyLeo PennAlf KjellinBob SweeneyIlen Reisner
Supporting actors
Al HarringtonKam FongWilliam SmithSharon FarrellHerman WedemeyerMoe KealeHarry EndoRichard Denning
Producers
Leonard FreemanPhilip LeacockDouglas Green
Season year
1972
Network
CBS
Purchase rights
Stream instantly Details
Format
Prime Video (streaming online video)
Devices
Available to watch on supported devices

Other formats

Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars

515 global ratings

  1. 86% of reviews have 5 stars
  2. 10% of reviews have 4 stars
  3. 2% of reviews have 3 stars
  4. 1% of reviews have 2 stars
  5. 0% of reviews have 1 stars
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Top reviews from the United States

C. C. BlackReviewed in the United States on July 9, 2021
4.0 out of 5 stars
In The Groove
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It may not need saying, but here we have classic "Hawaii Five–O" (1968–80), not its more recent reboot.

This series found its groove around Seasons 3 (1970–71) and 4 (1971–72). Both were above the series' average in general. Season 3 may have had a couple more standout episodes than its successor; overall, the quality of Season 4 was more consistently high for "hurry-up-get-the-film-in-the-can" U. S. TV production in the early '70s. Season 4 is sentimental in one respect: it was the last that featured Gilbert Lani Kauhi, a.k.a. Zulu, as Kono Kalakaua: the comedic muscle of Steve Garrett's original team of four. Though, sadly, he was given much less to do than Dan Blocker, his character was "Five-O"'s answer to Hoss Cartwright on "Bonanza."

The series was a police procedural, with change-ups into espionage, seriocomedy, and straight mysteries. What set it apart was on-location filming in the fiftieth state: a first for network television. A first-rate "Five-O" offers a tight script, good acting, creative direction, and smart use of Hawaii, arguably the show's brightest star. In these respects the most rewatchable episodes in this set are the season opener, "Highest Castle, Deepest Grave," an homage to "Laura" (1944), guest-starring Herbert Lom, France Nuyen, and Jeff Corey and beautifully scored by Morton Stevens, composer of the series' iconic theme; "Rest In Peace, Somebody," a taught assassination thriller scripted by John D. F. Black (an original "Star Trek" writer-producer); "Nine, Ten—You're Dead," featuring reliable Moses Gunn and Albert Paulsen, directed by Leo Penn (Sean's father) with another excellent musical score by Harry Geller; "Cloth Of Gold," directed by Micheal O'Herlihy, a "Five-O" long-hauler, which makes good use of the islands; and "Skinhead," with a powerhouse performance by Lee Paul, a segment so edgy that you wonder how it got past the censors. The scripts for some of these twenty-four episodes strain credulity ("Didn't We Meet At A Murder?"), offset by others that conclude with some nice twist endings.

The core cast—Jack Lord, James MacArthur, Kam Fong, and Zulu, all now wearing their characters as comfortably as their tailored suits—are well supported by many of that era's top actors: among others, Joanna Barnes, Beth Brickell, David Canary, Roger C. Carmel, Jackie Cooper, Hume Cronyn, Henry Darrow, Buddy Ebsen, Ed Flanders, James Hong, Jack Kruschen, Monte Markham, Vic Morrow, Simon Oakland, Tim O'Connor, Donald Pleasance, John Ritter, Jay Robinson, Marion Ross, Michael Strong, Barry Sullivan, Loretta Swit, Soon Taik-Oh, Malachi Throne, Dana Wynter. Richard Denning is back as the Governor. In a two-parter, "The Ninety-Second War," Khigh Dhiegh returns as McGarrett's nemesis, the Red Chinese agent Wo Fat. As always, this season makes smart use of many indigenous islanders in supporting roles.

As with Seasons 2 and 3, most episodes are accompanied by the original promos for next week's show, narrated by Jack Lord (who bids us, "Be here. Aloha"). Some episodes lack these trailers, probably because they've gone missing. These are the set's only special features—and they often contain spoilers. Let the viewer beware.

Technically the CBS-Paramount transfers are (usually) skip-free, clean, with clear audio, and closed-captioned (except for the trailers).

That's my run-down on "Hawaii Five-O: Season Four." If the price is right, it offers a day's worth of binge-worthy television.
Kevin O’Reviewed in the United States on June 20, 2021
5.0 out of 5 stars
Nice set-played wel on bluray player
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Seemed like quality disks, it’s kind of funny because they’ve taken this old show and put it on disks & everyone buts are just a bit wide because of modern flatscreen tv. Course I wouldn’t of even noticed, but my wife did we have had a few laughs, but that being said these a really good quality & we loved seeing McGarrett. If you buy these go read about Kono. Zulu/Kono in real life him McGarrett didn’t hit it off so he quit the show after 4 years and went back to being a nightclub comedian, wasn’t the best career move, but they didn’t develop him well Dano and chin ho got a lot more attention & Kono was actually funny & a good actor & the muscle
Depending on what you read some say there was a racial slur used and McGarrett got him fired for it. But it was more than that McGarrett treated him like garbage. Great writing, good acting, and intriguing plots where it was often very difficult to figure out who the bad guy was going to be.
5 star set
Reginald D. GarrardReviewed in the United States on June 18, 2009
5.0 out of 5 stars
The season that solidified the show as a classic!
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While other seasons, preceding and subsequent, had standout episodes, season four, as a whole, was a standout, featuring outstanding performances from guest stars, well-written and executed scripts, and the last hurrah for the original foursome (Jack Lord, James MacArthur, Kam Fong, and Zulu who would depart at the end of this season).

The show really got into its groove in a grand way with the first installment, "Highest Castle, Deepest Grave," reminiscent of the classic movie "Laura" with rare guest appearances from France Nuyen, movie veteran Herbert Lom, and respected acting coach Jeff Corey. Not only do they excel in their portrayals, star Jack Lord does well as he becomes enamored by the painting that hides a dark mystery.

Besides that particular episode, other noteworthy ones were:

"No Bottles, No Cans, No People" - Henry Darrow ("The High Chaparral") is featured as an unscrupulous crime boss intent on proving to other "hoods" on the mainland that he is a force to be reckoned with.

"3,000 Crooked Miles to Honolulu" - Buddy Ebsen, late of "The Beverly Hillbillies" and before "Barnaby Jones," guests as a criminal genius who thinks he has a flawless plan to make a fortune off of stolen travelers checks.

"Two Doves and Mr. Heron" - noteworthy solely for the appearance of a young John Ritter and the late Vic Morrow in a part that is rather provocative for the era

"And I Want Some Candy, and a Gun That Shoots" - featuring Jeanne Cooper before she became "Mrs. Chancellor" on "The Young and the Restless" and a young Annette O'Toole. The episode also allows Lord a chance to give commentary about the state of mental hospitals "revolving door" policies.

"The Burning Ice" - Former child star Jackie Cooper gives a rare performance as a doctor whose wife is apparently randomly murdered for her jewels but things, as always, are not all as they appear to be. Lou Antonio is quite good as the sympathetic suspect.

Guest Norman Alden is mostly heard and not seen in "Rest in Peace, Somebody," a taunt episode about a possible assassination plot on an unnamed victim.

"A Matter of Mutual Concern" proves there is no honor among thieves.

"Nine, Ten, You're Dead" showcases character actor Moses Gunn as a washed-up boxer who runs afoul of a shady promoter (Albert Paulsen). Guest Frank Webb, who would die tragically three years later, plays an unlikely hit man.

"Odd Man In" - Hume Cronyn comes back one more time as wily con man Lewis Filer.

"Bait Once, Bait Twice" features a pre-"M.A.S.H." Loretta Swit (her third appearance as guest on the show)

"Skinhead" - commentary on racism and also quite frank in its sexuality

"While you're at It, Bring Me the Moon" - Barry Sullivan guests as an eccentric millionaire, a la Howard Hughes. Other guests include "repeat performers" Milton Seltzer and Ed Flanders.

"Good Night Baby, Time to Die" - Beth Brickell and William Watson are antagonists in this well-crafted tale.

"Cloth of Gold" - Ray Danton, Jason Evers, and Jay Robinson guest as the unlikely targets of an mystery murderer, using a most ingenious modus operandi.

"Didn't We Meet at a Murder" offers three hit "men," all unlikely candidates for the job.

The final episode, "R & R & R" delivers a frightening guest turn from Alan Vint and also comments on the tragedy of war.

Surprisingly, one of the weakest episodes in the whole compilation is the two-parter "The 90-Second War" with the return of McGarrett's main nemesis Wo Fat (Khigh Dhiegh). Though it also stars movie veterans Donald Pleasance and Dana Wynter, along with returning Roger C. Carmel as Col. Mischa Toptegan, the installment seems rather bloated and slightly confusing, devoid of the usual good storytelling involving Wo Fat.

But that one, along with a couple of other "clunkers" doesn't lessen what is arguably one of the best in the show's twelve-year run.

The re-mastered set has good sound, outstanding clarity of picture and color.

Great music scores, a staple of the series, are supplied by Morton Stevens and Don B. Ray, among others.
7 people found this helpful
TV Generation DaveReviewed in the United States on March 15, 2013
5.0 out of 5 stars
Classic Cop Show
Verified purchase
Hawaii 5-0 (1968-1980) {CBS} 284 eps {12 yrs - all-time longest running Classic cop show}
Jack Lord {Steve McGarrett}, James MacArthur {Danno Williams}, Kam Fong {Chin}.
The All-Time Classic Cop Show set in paradise, that has an underbelly of crime that the state police unit must keep a lid on.
As an International Entry Point to the US, there's all sorts of crime & criminals trying to beat the system.
The scenery fascinated viewers worldwide, and Morton Steven's theme rocked up by Don B Ray, Harry Geller & Richard Shores catipulted the series to the top & the Hawaii 5-0 theme was the #1 instrumental trac for the entire year of 1969!!! ALL-TIME #1 TV THEME

Season 4, 24 eps, lots of great ones and 7 Classics, including The Return of LA Filer (which Hume Cronyn won an emmy for his role) and Ep 22 Disc 6, with "One of The Craziest Quotes in TV History" : Steve tells Kono to "Run down to Hotel St, put your ear to the coconut wireless, see if you can pick up any static".
3 people found this helpful
Richard GleitsmannReviewed in the United States on September 28, 2021
2.0 out of 5 stars
After the 4th Season I was ready to call it quits.
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Hawaii Five-0 was never a watershed crime drama that kept you riveted to you seat. After the feeling of nostalgia wears off, you get bored pretty quickly as the plots become more contrived and the casting becomes more ridiculous (making Western actors look Asian!). Besides, Kono was written out of the show!
Ole HossReviewed in the United States on August 10, 2013
5.0 out of 5 stars
One of the all time great television shows
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The original Hawaii Five O was one of the really great television shows. It was beautifully produced and, for the most part, well acted. The characters were realistic and believable, although some actresses overdid their histrionics and women were frequently portrayed as being dingy.

One of the great features of this series is the emphasis on the growing change in culture of the time; establishment vs. anti-establishment. An example is clothing. Five 0 personnel, the Governor, and even a lot of the bad guys wear suits and ties, while the "hip" people wear sport jackets and Hawaiian shirts. That's not campy, folks, that's the way it was in the late '60's and early '70's.

Many episodes presented a mystery to the viewers, and we tried to figure out what was going on before McGarrett did. That added to the fun of watching the shows. It was the quality of the production, acting, and visuals that made Hawaii Five 0 last for twelve seasons, and run in syndication to this day. The Leonard Freeman/Jack Lord version is rightly called a classic, something by which similar productions are judged.

The DVD's are excellent, sharp clean images wonderful color and great sound. This series is a real bargain. I hope to get all twelve seasons.
2 people found this helpful
C. BoergerReviewed in the United States on June 24, 2008
5.0 out of 5 stars
Five-O Fever
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Hawaii Five-O The Fourth Season rides the same wave of excellence that carried the series through seasons one, two and three. Season three in particular marked the onset of the show's glory years, and this season picks up where the last one left off. I admit, I might be a bit prejudiced when I say that the fourth season is probably my favorite, since it does feature my all-time favorite episode, Cloth of Gold, in which a group of wealthy and decadent real estate scammers are knocked off one by one via one of the most unusual murder weapons in television history, but, really, there are plenty of reasons to love and recommend this set. For one thing, it is more consistent than past seasons, with only one truly lame episode, Two Doves and Mr. Heron... even that provides the joy of watching John Ritter play a poetry-spouting vagrant-slash-hippie whose high-sounding morality suddenly disappears once he has a chance to abscond with fifty-thousand dollars. Five-O seems to have gotten a little edgier in season four, most notably in the increased level of violence. I don't know if it was just a matter of network standards relaxing, or the exposure to the Vietnam War on the news every night, but the violence in these episodes is generally more hard-hitting and disturbing, particularly in the classic episode ...And I Want Some Candy and a Gun That Shoots, which features a crazed Vietnam veteran who holes up in a roadside bunker with a rifle and takes pot shots at police officers. In fact, several of the culprits in these episodes are troubled vets just back from their tours of duty, which puts Five-O clearly ahead of its time in dealing with issues such as post-traumatic stress disorder. In addition to being more violent, the episodes are also more lurid. Which is fine, I always enjoyed a little bit of sleaze with my Five-O. Wednesday Ladies Free and the previously mentioned Cloth of Gold are classic episodes that imbue their nightmarish murder stories with elements of kink and sensationalism. But Skinhead ups the ante even further, brutally, and rather bluntly, dealing with the issues of racism and rape in a way that must have been pretty daring for its time. For example, an Asian woman assaulted by a white soldier is questioned on the witness stand about the irrelevant details of her sexual history, and is made to look like an instigator rather than a victim by the defendant's unctuous attorney. I wonder if any TV show prior to this dealt with as many peripheral issues involved in the difficult matter of rape as this episode does. It's a powerful show, and one of the season's best. So is Nine Ten, You're Dead, which uses one of Five-O's patented mainland syndicate storylines to comment on the damaging side effects of boxing.

But Five-O is just as notable for the fun and ingenious schemes it depicts as it is for its fearlessness in dealing with contemporary issues, and season four is no exception. 3.000 Crooked Miles to Honolulu, Didn't We Meet at a Murder, Odd Man In, Bait Once Bait Twice, While You're At It Bring In the Moon, Good Night Baby Time to Die, Rest in Peace Somebody and For a Million Why Not all have well-plotted stories that keep the viewer guessing, and completely enthralled. Wo Fat makes a welcome appearance. In one especially haunting episode, the usually staunch McGarrett falls in love with a painting. In addition, the camerawork is as gritty, the music as flashy, the perps as ruthless and clever(just not as clever as McGarrett), the scenery as lush, and McGarrett as hard-boiled and unflinching as ever.

Thanks to CBS, the early '70's live again, in all their gritty and entertaining glory, and with hardly any signs of rust. Be there. Aloha.
10 people found this helpful
AlbertReviewed in the United States on January 28, 2009
4.0 out of 5 stars
Wow! Season 4 of Hawaii Five-O
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Now with season 4, does it get better than season 3. Well yes but the last disc in this package #5 had one show that didn't play correctly, it's a defect in the disc. Because of this I only rated this 4 out of 5.

Every other show played correctly. Besides that problem the story lines in season 4 some were okay some were just boring to watch. But still the music and sound effects and Jack Lord made up for those. I'll always enjoy watching Hawaii Five-O and will continue to get the rest of the seasons as soon as they're available.

Season 4 one of the staff won't be in Season 5 I'll just mention that here but won't give out names not to give the story away. Seasons 1, 2, and 3 were great to watch!

Again if your a die hard fan might as well pick this season up as well!

Catch you over at season 5.
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