House

 (1,982)
8.72005X-RayTV-14
Dr. Gregory House is devoid of bedside manner and wouldn't even talk to his patients if he could get away with it. Dealing with his own constant physical pain, he uses a cane that seems to punctuate his acerbic, brutally honest demeanor while his unconventional thinking and flawless instincts have afforded him a great deal of respect.
Starring
Omar EppsJennifer MorrisonJesse Spencer
Genres
DramaSuspense
Subtitles
English [CC]
Audio languages
EnglishEnglish [Audio Description]

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  1. 1. Pilot
    November 16, 2004
    44min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English, English [Audio Description]
    Would you want a doctor who holds your hand while you die or a doctor who ignores you while you get better?
  2. 2. Paternity
    April 5, 1957
    43min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English, English [Audio Description]
    Dr. House goes with his gut and performs an unethical act to prove what he suspects to be the link to a teenage lacrosse player's illness in order to save the boy's life.
  3. 3. Occam's Razor
    November 29, 2004
    44min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English, English [Audio Description]
    Dr. House and his team race to save a young man who may have not one, but two illnesses killing him.
  4. 4. Maternity
    December 6, 2004
    44min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English, English [Audio Description]
    A maternity ward epidemic forces House to decide whether to save the life of one child over another.
  5. 5. Damned If You Do
    December 13, 2004
    44min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English, English [Audio Description]
    Dr. House's approach is questioned when he treats a nun for what he believes to be an allergy, not realizing the nun's past is coming back to haunt her.
  6. 6. The Socratic Method
    December 20, 2004
    44min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English, English [Audio Description]
    The case of a schizophrenic mom with a deadly disease and her teenage son who have traded caretaking roles holds a special interest for Dr. House.
  7. 7. Fidelity
    December 27, 2004
    44min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English, English [Audio Description]
    Dr. House's diagnosis of a married woman with a rare sleep disorder forces her and her husband to examine their marriage and question their trust for each other.
  8. 8. Poison
    January 24, 2005
    44min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English, English [Audio Description]
    House and his team have to act fast when a high school student is admitted with a mysterious and lethal poisoning, especially when they discover more teens have been diagnosed with the same deadly illness.
  9. 9. DNR
    January 31, 2005
    44min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English, English [Audio Description]
    House has to defend himself when he treats a patient who has legally chosen to refuse treatment.
  10. 10. Histories
    February 7, 2005
    44min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English, English [Audio Description]
    Dr. House and the team treat a homeless woman whose worsening symptoms and unknown identity prove to be a complex mystery.
  11. 11. Detox
    February 14, 2005
    44min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English, English [Audio Description]
    Dr. House takes Cuddy's challenge to go off his painkillers for a week, but the effects of his withdrawal symptoms may put his patient in danger.
  12. 12. Sports Medicine
    February 21, 2005
    43min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English, English [Audio Description]
    A baseball player's comeback is cut short when he breaks his arm and House and his team have to act fast to figure out what is causing major bone loss that's killing the player and his dreams.
  13. 13. Cursed
    February 28, 2005
    45min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English, English [Audio Description]
    Dr. House's young patient believes his illness is the result of a curse while House uncovers important information about Chase's father.
  14. 14. Control
    March 14, 2005
    44min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English, English [Audio Description]
    The hospital's new Chairman of the Board has it out for Dr. House, questioning his importance to the hospital and threatening to eliminate House and his team.
  15. 15. Mob Rules
    March 21, 2005
    44min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English, English [Audio Description]
    Dr. House and his team race to diagnose a member of the mob and get him well enough to testify and enter the witness protection program while Cuddy works to convince Vogler of House's importance to the hospital.
  16. 16. Heavy
    March 28, 2005
    44min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English, English [Audio Description]
    Dr. House and his team try to uncover the reason a 10-year-old has a heart attack while House suspects one of his team is selling him out to Vogler.
  17. 17. Role Model
    April 11, 2005
    44min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English, English [Audio Description]
    House and his team battle to save a presidential hopeful, and House refuses to give in to Vogler's ultimatum when given the chance to save one of his team members.
  18. 18. Babies & Bathwater
    April 18, 2005
    44min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English, English [Audio Description]
    House and his team battle to diagnose a pregnant patient's life-threatening illness, prompting her to make the most emotional decision of her life, and Vogler is determined to fire House.
  19. 19. Kids
    May 2, 2005
    44min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English, English [Audio Description]
    House and his team race to diagnose a 12-year-old's illness - an illness with a shocking origin - and House asks Cameron to come back to her job.
  20. 20. Love Hurts
    May 9, 2005
    44min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English, English [Audio Description]
    House and his team tackle the case of a young man with a penchant for odd behavior, and House prepares for his date with Cameron.
  21. 21. Three Stories
    May 16, 2005
    44min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English, English [Audio Description]
    House must decide whether to take the case of his ex-love's husband and he gives medical students a lecture they'll never forget.
  22. 22. Honeymoon
    May 23, 2005
    44min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English, English [Audio Description]
    House is faced with a problem he may not be able to solve and Stacy returns.

More details

Directors
Greg YaitanesDeran SarafianDavid StraitonDaniel AttiasDaniel SackheimMiguel SapochnikDavid PlattMatt ShakmanJuan José CampanellaKatie Jacobs
Season year
2005
Network
David Shore
Content advisory
Substance usefoul languagesexual contentviolencefrightening scenes
Purchase rights
Stream instantly Details
Format
Prime Video (streaming online video)
Devices
Available to watch on supported devices

Other formats

Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars

1982 global ratings

  1. 88% of reviews have 5 stars
  2. 7% of reviews have 4 stars
  3. 3% of reviews have 3 stars
  4. 0% of reviews have 2 stars
  5. 2% of reviews have 1 stars
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Top reviews from the United States

Upright ApeReviewed in the United States on September 12, 2010
3.0 out of 5 stars
Season One, CEO Vogler, Babies, and Bathwater
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I like House M. D. very much overall, enough to start collecting the entire series on DVD; but Season One was actually the low point for me, largely because of the resolution of the plot-line involving CEO Edward Vogler. I gave the season a 3-star rating because even with that significant disappointment, I thought House M. D. was better than average as a medical drama. Two stars would have been too harsh.

By comparison, all of the other seasons but seven (which hasn't aired yet as of the date of this review) have been outstanding.

As with any series, season one's writing, context, themes, characterizations, production, et al, experienced some initial unevenness as cast and crew worked through their adjustments to each other and the series. For example, there was the almost unbelievable degree to which the characters interfered in each others' personal lives. Yes, there are busybodies everywhere, especially in such interactive workplace settings as hospitals. However there were times when the Princeton Plainsboro Teaching Hospital seemed more like the Princeton Plainsboro Junior High School - a building populated by self-appointed experts in everything, especially the one thing they all seemed to do worst: handle their own interpersonal relationships.

In one sequence two of the characters seem ready to begin tentative dating. One of them asks the other not to tell their coworkers anything about it. Now, what would a junior high school student do? You guessed it. The "personal" secret is divulged within seconds of the promise not to do so. Immediately thereafter, the other members of the clique weigh in with their expert advice.

Events like these tended to moderate somewhat towards the end of the season. Unfortunately, no one ever said anything realistic like "shut up and mind your own business", as if any of these characters would have complied. On the other hand, the close personal friendships that might include such interventions did become more easily identified as the series progressed, as did the usual shallow manipulators found everywhere, here elevated to the level of caricature.

All of the foregoing is to be expected in a new series. That House M. D. survives this adjustment in style is a testament to what is positive about the series.

With the entry of the new CEO Edward Vogler, things got really interesting. The show's producers and writers were faced with the challenge of creating an antithesis for Dr. House. This could not have been easy given the already established complexities of the character, as well as House's ability to serve as his own antithesis. They came up with a brilliant idea. They combined the characters of Drs. House, Cutty, and Wilson, and created Vogler as the antithesis to the combination.

Before I go into the major spoilers, I'll describe part of the scenario without giving away any critical details - I hope. I've re-read the following paragraphs a few times and I don't believe I've said anything that would ruin the watching of this particular plot-line for a new viewer. If you're worried about that, you might want to skip the rest of this review. If you're not, keep reading until you get to the in-your-face spoiler warning.

Now then - in one corner was Edward Vogler, the hospital's worst nightmare: a new self-appointed CEO with a lot of money the hospital needed and an agenda that had nothing to do with healthcare. He ruled a pharmaceutical empire and was out to bring in big business for himself and his corporation. He was played in fantastic form by Chi McBride and was a delight to watch as he played the villainous genius.

In the other corner was the good-guy genius, the gestalt House/Cutty/Wilson. House was the irascible rebel aspect, all medical talent and drive for that talent, unwilling to let anything get in between him and his advocacy for his patients. In fact he used the word often whenever asked to explain why he persevered with a patient against seemingly impossible medical and bureaucratic odds: "I advocated for my patient." Like Vogler, he would not compromise.

Cutty was the mediating aspect, trying desperately to come up with a way out of the mess that would salvage something positive. She was uncertain at first. She made mistakes. But she figured it out and opted for the only sane solution, as painful as the necessary sacrifices were to make that happen.

Wilson was pure loyalty, House's closest friend for reasons they themselves didn't completely understand, but never in question when it came to knowing what should be done. He picked up the slack in Cutty's uncertainty.

With players like Hugh Laurie as Dr. House, Lisa Edelstein as Dr. Cutty, and Robert Sean Leonard as Dr. Wilson arrayed against Chi McBride's Vogler character, a virtual nuclear war for control of the hospital ensued. For his part, Vogler was honest about what he wanted. It wasn't about the money. He wanted House's obedience.

While the war was great fun to watch, the outcome contained two elements I did not like. That's where the major spoilers come in. So,

*** WARNING WARNING WARNING ***

*** MAJOR SPOILERS FOLLOW ***

*** DON'T READ ON UNLESS YOU'VE ALREADY SEEN THE OUTCOME, OR YOU DON'T MIND KNOWING SOMETHING ABOUT IT ***

Two medical emergencies, one proving to be fatal for one patient, occurred just prior to the end of the conflict. Meanwhile, Vogler was in the process of trying to eliminate his competition on the Board of Directors - by then both Cutty and Wilson had voted against him - so that he could get a unanimous vote to fire House.

In one of the emergencies, House and his team were trying to treat a pregnant woman who was undergoing a number of grave physical and psychological crises. Treatment of the mother's illness could kill the baby. A C-Section at that time carried a 20% mortality risk for the baby.

After some give and take with his staff and the parents, House decides that the optimum solution for mother, child, and father, is to deliver the baby by C-Section as soon as possible. Treatment for the mother's serious illness would follow immediately after delivery.

Just as the C-Section surgery was about to begin, Vogler called directly into the operating room and canceled the surgery. I wasn't clear on his exact justification for doing that, but it was obvious that he was making his final moves to get House out of the picture.

The mother then developed another serious complication that ultimately will kill her. House informs the father that the only option at that point was to save the child. The C-Section was then performed successfully but the mother died as expected.

It seemed clear to me that had the original C-Section surgery not been canceled by Vogler, there was a chance that both mother and child would both have survived. The baby would have been delivered. At that time if the mother still experienced the complication, she could have been treated more aggresively because the baby would be in no danger from her emergency treatment.

Vogler ultimately lost his battle against the board by way of Cutty's final defiance and impassioned speech. What did not happen was any charge of culpability in the mother's death against Vogler. By interfering with that C-Section when he did, he prevented the doctors from being able to treat the mother aggressively when the additional complication occurred. Essentially, Vogler practiced medicine without a license. And as a demonstrable result, a patient died.

That was my major disappointment with the resolution of the Vogler plotline. Vogler's meddling killed a patient. Vogler did not pay for this crime.

My other disappointment concerned a somewhat less serious case. Am infant with low weight and seemingly poor nutrition problems was treated by House. He concluded that the Vegan diet given to the infant by her parents had compromised the nutrition of the child enough to palce the child in danger. However he did not personally consider their actions to be unlawful negligence. He made the judgment call that they had just been stupid and recommended a course of treatment including a healthy diet. He was confident that they would follow his instructions.

Vogler interfered with this treatment as well. He got wind of what House was doing and forced Cutty to call a state child support agents to have the parents arrested just as House was about to send the child home with them.

The parents made bail and immediately returned to the hospital to petition Dr. House to let them see the child. In the course of telling them that it was out of his hands legally, they told him that the child's Vegan diet and been supervised by a licensed nutritionist. He had not known this when he made the first diagnosis. He re-examined the child, found a medical condition unrelated to parental negligence, treated the child successfully, and got Cutty to reverse the charges against the couple.

I'm on shaky ground with this one because Vogler's culpability involves a little second-guessing. Technically, Vogler took advantage of a valid legal situation and an initial mistake by House to countermand what the doctor was doing. However, given the way House worked and how the series and progressed thus far, I realized the House would have eventually realized his mistake and treated the child successfully. Not only is this consistent with how he always works - but in this particular case, the child's non-response to the initial dietary treatment would have made him suspicious of another cause. He would have determined the real cause anyway, with no one being arrested in the interim.

Thus while what Vogel did was legalistically valid, the ultimate result was the arrest of the parents on false charges. This is where the word "unethical" comes into play. Once again, Vogler was practicing medicine without a license. And once again, a mistake at the expense of a patient and family was made. As before, Vogel did not suffer any liability for this mistake.

Vogel was of course tossed by the Hospital board by votes in favor of House, Wilson, and Cutty. But he also took his $100 million investment with him, and went back to being a plain old CEO of a pharmaceutical empire. His own board and stockholders may have taken offense against him at things House said during a speech on one of the company's new products. This was never mentioned in the series.

Vogel made costly mistakes in patient health and lives. His new drug was exposed as a sham by House at a press release. He got away with too much.

All of that was why the resolution of the Vogler plot-line in season one disappointed me. In was a huge anti-climax after the brilliantly played sparring between the major players.

Aside from those minor points, everything was fine. The series has been great otherwise.

UpRight Ape
2 people found this helpful
Lawrance BernaboReviewed in the United States on November 9, 2005
5.0 out of 5 stars
Hugh Laurie's Dr. House makes deadly diseases fun again
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What became clear to me as I watched Season One of "House, M.D.," is how the show walks a tightrope. There are few shows on television that are as formulaic as this one, where a patient with an unknown medical malady is brought into the hospital and Dr. Gregory House (Hugh Laurie), an infectious disease specialist, has to figure out the medical puzzle to save the patient from dying. Working with his team of young doctors, House spends most of a typical episode eliminating possibilities, which is a nice way of saying he is usually the wrong diagnosis until the final act. For example, in "Fidelity" a woman is brought in dead asleep and everything from tumors to breast cancer to rabbit fever is considered before House pulls African sleeping sickness out of his hat.

Obviously, if House walks in and is able to make the diagnosis much earlier than that, then they do not that much of a story. Still, there are episodes where the diagnosis is arrived at early on and the dramatic concern is getting the patient (or the hospital, etc.) to accept the treatment. In "Fidelity" the problem ends up being that somebody has to admit to having an affair to confirm the diagnosis. A better example of this type of episode is "DNR," where a legendary jazz musician is diagnosed as dying from ALS and House violates the DNR order to save the man's life. But even these variations on the theme ultimately just show how dominant the formula is here.

What makes "House" work is that the central character is so compelling, which is why my favorite episode is "Three Stories," which is the one that is most about House, even though he pretends it is not. House is a brilliant diagnostician but he is also rude, acerbic, and condescending in the extreme (and that is one a good day). I was thinking that House is one of those colorful characters, like Columbo or Monk, who has their own unique way of doing what they do, except that House is not as loveable. But then I have to admit there is something rather attractive about somebody who does not put up with the rules when they get in the way, who takes pleasure in finding interesting ways to insult people to their face, and who is able to get away with everything because he is so good at what he does.

But I got tired of Columbo after a few years and House is more like Monk in providing a supporting cast for the title character to play against. In terms of his team of clinicians they are all on House's bad side to begin with because they are young and inexperienced, but each is presented as pushing a particular button for House: Dr. Allison Cameron (Jennifer Morrison) is female, Dr. Eric Foreman (Omar Epps) is black, and Dr. Robert Chase (Jesse Spencer) provides a double dip by being both rich and English. Not that House has a prejudicial bone in his body (just the bad one in his leg and a need to get under people's skin). Dr. Lisa Cuddy (Lisa Edelstein) rubs House the wrong way because she is (technically) his boss, but the chief fun there is bouncing back and forth between demeaning her as a doctor and as a bureaucrat. Then there is Dr. James Wilson (Robert Sean Leonard), who is literally House's only friend in the world on the strength of being able (and willing) to stand toe-to-toe and argue things out.

The introduction of billionaire Edward Vogel (Chi McBride) as the clinic's new Chairman of the Board ("Control") was an unnecessary major subplot in Season One because giving more system for a guy who bucks the system to buck is just overkill and adding obstacles that can only kill people gets old quickly. Vogel's attempt to get House to fire one of his doctors ("Heavy") was interesting because it revealed that his team are pretty interchangeable; for some reason I was thinking that it would make more sense if each had their own specialties, but then I decided that does not make sense, either in terms of how you treat an expert in infectious diseases or having writers understand who is responsible for what in each script.

Another thing that Season One proved is that House's romantic life is not in the present, but in the past. Cameron's attempt to force a date with House ("Love Hurts") was painful, while the arrival of ex-flame Stacy Warner (Sela Ward) for the last two episodes simply proves House's sex appeal is as man of mystery. Hints that there might be an actual human being behind that facade are all that are going to work, and as another person who knew House before he needed a cane, Warner allows a few more looks behind the mask. The main thing is that the writers have as much fun coming up with nasty things for House to say as Laurie has declaiming them with an American accent.
20 people found this helpful
Mrz Mercedes Reviewed in the United States on July 25, 2022
5.0 out of 5 stars
Good condition
Verified purchase
Love this show. Good condition
One person found this helpful
KcornReviewed in the United States on November 25, 2005
4.0 out of 5 stars
Goes far beyond ANY medical dramas on tv today - ER this is NOT!
Verified purchase
I really didn't "get" this show at first. It had to grow on me, as I did not instantly warm up to the main character, Dr House...at least, not at first. He seemed egotistical, downright rude and pretty offputting.

I also couldn't figure out (at first) if this show was a medical drama, medical mystery (kind of like the CSI of diseases) or a character-driven series. Turns out it is all three, along with some of the best one-liners on television, the kind of dialogue that made me chuckle in surprise, when I wasn't laughing out loud at the humor and cleverness of the writers.

After I stuck with the first couple of episodes,that was it...by then, I'd become a true addict of the show, alternately fascinated and repelled by "House," a doc who is a true rebel but one with enough genius to be (barely) tolerated by his patients and associates.

Then there is the medical info, which is always interesting, especially since the show uses a the technique where viewers see very authentic interior views of bodies as they react to diseases, medicine and lifesaving techniques. If you're squeamish about such things, be forewarned.

This show dares to push the envelope and you may find yourself hard-pressed to understand why ANY hospital would keep a doc like House around, someone who seems to be a major liability, upsetting patients and using unorthodox techniques (and "unorthodox" is putting it lightly). He should have standing appointments with legal counsel and he generally pops into the hospital's legal administrator once or twice an episode. Luckily, she maintains some grudging affection for him.

House's associates, beleagured and badgered as they are by him, are also good counterpoints to his intense, often "over the top" persona. They reflect the world of the normal, something House can only glance at from a distance, being so far from normal that it is probably only a speck in the distance, if he even perceives normality at all.

What truly keeps House from being overly irritating are signs that his enormous ego and incredible rudeness mask some deep insecurities and even some sensitivity. Could he actually be a romantic at heart? Or is that just another manipulative guise of his, one of many he uses as needed (ethics isn't his strong suit).

Each episode is far from predictable. Just when I think I have the "formula" for the show figured out, they throw a curve ball, whether it is introducing Sela Ward as a possible love interest, ramping up the chemistry between other characters or watching House 'treat" a patient by hitting him with his cane in....well...some very sensitive areas. He even befriends a rat just before his cane comes down on the animal, simply because the rat tips his head, a tipoff to some peculiar biochemistry that may tie in with another patient's diagnosis. It is these odd little moments that help make the show a standout.
16 people found this helpful
calvinnmeReviewed in the United States on August 23, 2009
5.0 out of 5 stars
Outstanding season, not so great packaging
Verified purchase
I've watched House in a catch-as-catch-can manner over the last five years, in first runs and reruns, but I just recently decided to buy the seasons on DVD and watch episodes back-to-back. Everyone has pretty much said all there is to say about this season already, since the DVDs for season one have been out for four years. I hadn't seen the arc with billionaire Edward Vogler that runs from midseason until about two episodes prior to the end of the season. He gives the hospital one hundred million dollars with the condition that he be made chairman of the board. Vogler thinks that the problem with medicine is that it is not run like a business, and he sets out to run it that way. Thus he and the tenured House quickly find themselves at cross purposes. Indeed, Vogler cannot easily get rid of House, but he can threaten his untenured staff, and it is interesting to see the two spar.

At the end of the season House's ex-girlfriend Stacy resurfaces with an ill husband in tow, asking House's help to diagnose and cure her husband. The husband is not only combative - he at first denies there is anything at all wrong with him - he also has all of the se x appeal of the Stay Puffed Marshmallow Man. She had to have married this guy on the rebound and furthermore he has to have known that. This rather unbelievable triangle plays itself out in season two.

Seeing the episodes in order I did realize I had seen several of them before, including the pilot. What impressed me was that at the time I saw it I didn't realize it was the pilot, or necessarily even in the first season. That's one thing that really impresses me about this show - from the beginning of the series the players are completely in character. House being assigned to clinic duty in the hospital - a task he most reluctantly takes on - allows the opportunity for short funny cases to break up the bigger mystery of the one large case that dominates each episode, and really keeps things going.

As for the packaging, this season is on dual sided discs, and that makes for easy scratching, so be aware of this if you decide to purchase this season used. All of the extra features are on the second side of the last disc, and this consists of a few interviews and a tour of the set. What was nice about the packaging of this first season is that there is a synopsis for each episode plus the original air date.

Highly recommended for those few people who are fans but who haven't purchased the DVDs of the series yet.
2 people found this helpful
Roger LongReviewed in the United States on February 7, 2011
5.0 out of 5 stars
A medical Sherlock
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Dr. Gregory House M.D. is a first-class detective, but not one who is detecting murderers and other criminals. The villains are all medical ailments, but the methodology is much the same. At a New Jersey hospital, he is the chief of diagnostic medicine assigned to the most puzzling cases.

House and Sherlock Holmes have much in common. Sherlock was addicted to cocaine. House is addicted to pain kiillers for a disability that has left him hobbling and using a cane. Neither House nor Holmes is much interested in ingratiating himself to others. In fact, House's bedside manner tends often to be downright insulting. "All patients lie," he says in the pilot episode. But there is no substitute for competence and House is certainly most competent. Would you not rather go to a doctor who was competent than to one who was very pleasant and didn't know Shinola when he saw it? Even the names are similar: House/Holmes. One has to assume that was intentional on the part of the writers.

Grey's Anatomy, ER and most other medical shows border on soap opera and often cross the line. House M.D. doesn't. It focuses on House's battles in getting past the rules and incompetence around him in his attempt to save lives. For the most part he cares far more about winning against the ailment at hand than about the individual patient.

I do wonder, however, if any hospital would tolerate for long Dr. House's insulting of patients, the staff and the administration. He's very good at what he does, certainly, but is he really good enough to overcome his shabby appearance, his breaking of all the rules that don't suit him, and his rudeness? Somehow I doubt it.
12 people found this helpful
KateJonesReviewed in the United States on June 14, 2005
5.0 out of 5 stars
Verplicht kijken !
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The first episode got me hooked right from the start, and the whole first season was excellent.
We get to know Dr. House, a cranky limping doctor who doesn't nearly care as much for his patients as he cares for solving the puzzle (eg - what's wrong with them).
It's such a joy to see an actor (the brilliant Hugh Laurie) and his role (Dr. House) fit so perfectly well together.
The rest of the cast, as well as the patients-of-the-week, are really well casted too.
I love the quick-witted interaction between House and his bestest (only) friend Wilson (Robert Sean Leonard), and the way House never pays for his own food. The not-too-subtle flirtation that won't really cross that line between House and Cuddy, his boss (Lisa Edelstein), makes for the lighter funny moments.
House's quick snappy slightly dark self deprecating humor often result in me laughing out loud.
House's team (affectionately called "the ducklings" online because they're always trotting along one 1 step behind him) are really there for House to bounce ideas off of, and to keep him somewhat in line (although it's mainly Cuddy who makes sure he keeps mostly on the legal side of the law).
And then there is the undercurrent of happiness, or, in House's case, lack thereof. His chronic pain, resulting Vicodin (mis)use combined with his personality and the not-so-occasional scotch often show us a glimpse miserable lonely side of the brilliant doctor. He might think he's God and omnipotent, but at least physically there are many things he can not do. Definitely worth watching!
7 people found this helpful
dazieReviewed in the United States on August 29, 2011
5.0 out of 5 stars
Unique, Brilliant and Great to Watch
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Dr. House, "HOUSE" has EASILY become one of my favorite shows. Is he rude ? .. well yeah do you think he could "tone it down"... well yeah, but if he DID, he wouldn't be the House we have grown to love. It's great to watch as He, and his Team learn to work together, and learn how the characters past lives and experiences have gotten them to where they are and how they each take a different approach to views on the patient and life and morals. House, in his own way will "rarely" ever say it (or show it) but he does care for them and his circle of friends and in his own sort of backwards harsh way, Teaches to get his team to Think on their own, make their own decisions and to not let certain things get them off the path of what is the core problem. Yes, House is a puzzle solver, and the last 10 minutes of his realizations are always great, whether it is Wilson who inspires him and gives him that last puzzle piece, or Cuddy, or something on one of his favorite Soap Operas. Been re-watching the last few seasons until Season 8 starts, wow, they all looked so YOUNG when the show started. This show will not disappoint for those who havent gotten into it yet, check it out, you'll def be hooked ! Great Job Writers, keep it up!
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