Hugo

 (5,624)7.52 h 6 min2011X-RayPG
Set in 1930s Paris, an orphan who lives in the walls of a train station is wrapped up in a mystery involving his late father and an automaton.
Directors
Martin Scorsese
Starring
Asa ButterfieldChloë Grace MoretzBen Kingsley
Genres
Kids
Subtitles
English [CC]
Audio languages
English
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Supporting actors
Sacha Baron CohenRay WinstoneEmily MortimerChristopher LeeHelen McCroryMichael StuhlbargJude Law
Producers
Johnny DeppTim HeadingtonGraham KingMartin Scorsese
Studio
Paramount
Rating
PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)
Purchase rights
Stream instantly Details
Format
Prime Video (streaming online video)
Devices
Available to watch on supported devices

Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars

5624 global ratings

  1. 79% of reviews have 5 stars
  2. 11% of reviews have 4 stars
  3. 5% of reviews have 3 stars
  4. 2% of reviews have 2 stars
  5. 3% of reviews have 1 stars

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Top reviews from the United States

Nicholas DollakReviewed in the United States on January 13, 2017
4.0 out of 5 starsA Spectacular Treat for All Ages - especially for cinephiles
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I'm surprised this film didn't do better at the box office. It is truly a cinematic delight that works on many levels. Children will enjoy the young characters and the story, and older viewers will catch the more subtle layers. Film buffs will spot all sorts of well-researched goodies in there, including a poster for a "Fantomas" movie and a nightmare based on an actual train accident that occurred at another Parisian railway station at the time. The story of the orphan Hugo, his friend Isabelle, and the automaton they salvage is all deftly woven into the true story of the re-discovery of Georges Melies, a magician who created many eye-popping short silent films at the turn of the century. Like some fantastic clock, all these disparate pieces work together to form a coherent whole. (For example, the people who work at/frequent the Metro all play their parts like clockwork - and their little stories-within-the-story are all classic silent movie plots!)

I had the good fortune to see this film in 3-D in theaters, and the effect is used to its fullest potential here. If you don't have 3-D TV, you're still in for a treat; if you do, you're in for a bigger treat.

My one grievance is that there is no audio commentary track. As a cinephile, I would very much have loved to hear Mr. Scorcese and/or a film historian discuss the minutiae of this richly detailed film.
58 people found this helpful
Tom & Vic B.Reviewed in the United States on November 7, 2018
2.0 out of 5 starsI wish I could write better about it
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I really wanted to like this movie: charming setting, sympathetic characters and story, sweet little side-plots. But alas, it was brutally slow, redundant and misleading. The automaton seems so very important, you almost think there will be some sort of dark, Series of Unfortunate Events sort of backstory, but it ends up being utterly unimportant. The story about the bond between Hugo and his father could have been so powerful and they just flushed it down the toilet. We never see his precious notebook again in the movie after it's taken.

The cinematographer's grief about not being able to practice his art because "times changed" is way less dramatic than the sad story you think you are going to learn about him. I sat there thinking, seriously? He's broken because he doesn't make relevant movies any more? There was no shocking scandal or tragic death that drove him away from movies? The girl isn't somehow a love child he had with Hugo's cheating mother who wasn't really dead, but just ran off? I mean...there are so many other directions it could have gone. It was lame.

And finally, most annoyingly, Hugo is never vindicated for his work maintaining the train station clocks. He is chased plenty, but never gets credit for doing such amazing work nor does he seem to ever get back pay.

The whole movie is surprisingly family-friendly except for the part where Cohen's character (surprise!) discusses "having relations" with a local officer. The audio is quieter here and it will probably fly over most kids heads, but at the same time, I didn't appreciate it in a movie that seems to be aimed at the under-12 crowd.

If you are looking for trains and gears to keep your kids out of your hair for two long, slow hours, this movie fits the bill. If you want a movie that's engaging for the whole family: keep looking.
9 people found this helpful
Mateo SReviewed in the United States on September 8, 2016
5.0 out of 5 starsGreat film for lovers of film!
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Truly a great film. It can and should be viewed by people of all ages, especially those who have a deep appreciation for film. I completely disagree that this isn't something we'd expect from Scorcese—to me it makes perfect sense that he'd do a movie about the beauty of movies! From the opening shot of Paris as a giant cog in a machine to the final shot, Hugo pulls the viewer in with beautiful imagery and color that reaches right off the screen—whether you see it in 3D or not. There are elements of fantasy and reality woven into the storyline. Just like in life, many of the characters are broken people, incomplete and yearning to be "fixed. However, the film's major theme is cinema—the birth, death, its beauty and importance of restoration both for lovers of film and for the (sometimes) forgotten filmmakers who blazed the trails for its place in human history. The film is never boring; these rich themes are always conveyed through brilliant metaphors and allegorical storytelling. Ben Kingsley's performance as George Miliés is heartfelt, touching, and brilliant!
22 people found this helpful
Loves to troubleshootReviewed in the United States on November 24, 2018
5.0 out of 5 starsSTELLAR PERFORMANCES MULTIPLE STORY LINES MASTERFULLY INTERWOVEN AGAINST POST GREAT WAR PARIS
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M SCORSESE MUST HAVE BEEN GIVEN CARTE BLANCHE ....HIS GENIUS LEFT UNCHECKED HAS CREATED ANOTHER TIMELESS MASTERPIECE. DO NOT THINK OR ASSUME THAT THIS WORK COULD RELATE , BE COMPARED , OR CUBBY HOLED WITH ANYTHING HE HAS DONE BEFORE. IT IS A STAND ALONE .,OUT OF THE BOX ., CAREER MAKER OF A TALENTED MASTER OF MANY EXCELLENT PRODUCTIONS , TRAIL BLAZING OF A WELL KNOWN FORMULA THAT PROVEN LESS SUCCESSFUL MORE OFTEN THAT NOT, THIS REINVENTION OF GATHERING AT EVERY LEVEL THE VERY BEST, THE TOP , THE NONESUCH , AND PROVIDING THE ABSOLUTE BEST SUPPORT WITHOUT LIMIT (CANT IMAGINE WHAT THE CATERING MUST HAVE BEEN LIKE , OR GRIPS LIKE A CREW OF HIGHLY TRAINED HOWLER MONKEYS ..) AND YES , YES I AM YELLING. I WOULD SCREAM TO THE HEAVENS , TO MY NEIGHBORS , TO ALL THE SHIPS AT SEA ,TO THE MASSES BREACHING OUR BORDERS AND THE LOVED ONES LEFT BEHIND , TO THOSE THAT WOULD HATE US !!! GOD BLESS US AND GOD BLESS MARTIN AND THIS MASTERPIECE... HE TOOK ON FEEL GOOD, FAMILY VALUES, COMING OF AGE,, HISTORICALLY CORRECT , ...BLAH BLAH BLAH AND KNOCKED THIS ONE OUT OF THE PARK.
7 people found this helpful
TigerlillyReviewed in the United States on May 13, 2018
5.0 out of 5 starsEverything you want in a movie
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This is everything you hope for when you sit down to watch a movie. The set design and cinematography are phenomenal. The acting is top notch. The story good and is executed so well. Interestingly, the story is based on the life of a real person (not the title character). Yet, it's not one of those "slice of life" art house movies; it's a real adventure. When this came out, I thought it was a children's movie, so I didn't see it (Too bad: it would have been awesome in the theater.) It turns out this is a great movie for people of all ages.
12 people found this helpful
Phillip AllenReviewed in the United States on September 21, 2019
5.0 out of 5 starsABSOLUTE MAGIC
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When this film first came out, I saw it. And understood next to nothing. Boring. Long. Pointless. Incoherent. All the nonsense you'll doubtless read in all of the negative reviews. Of course, the film wasn't the problem; I was. My utter lack of understanding, my own ignorance.

Now, of course, i see it with fresh eyes and the distinct advantage of deeper understanding. And it all makes perfect sense. This isn't a film about some old man at the turn of the last century; or about some boy living in a train station; or about automatons. This is a film about film and filmmaking. What else would Scorsese make this film about? All throughout this film there are "clips", recreations of famous films from the beginning, the foundations, of filmmaking. I still haven't caught on to them all, but at least now I know they are there, in this gorgeous, heartbreakingly beautiful work of art.

I suppose it is quite the ultimate irony -- the meaning and purpose of film. One of the solid truths you learn from Hugo is that film is not literal. Even "documentaries" are not documentaries. The moment an image is captured on film, it departs the realm of the real and enters the world of the dream. ALL films do this. Every one. Even the coldest, most "literal" documentary you can name ultimately becomes a collective human dream. This is what makes people who protest films for one stupid reason or another so pathetic, so ignorant, worse than the lowest worm slithering through the mud. They try (always unsuccessfully) to concretize, to literalize works of art. And it matters not that one person says this work of art is "good" and that one is "bad". These are meaningless terms, which belong to the world of life. While art belongs exclusively to the world of the mind, of dreams. While it is true that all art if valid; it is also true that some art (in my opinion only) is garbage. That doesn't make it any less a work of art. It just might be a very poor work of art. Still, it is art.

This is just one of the many details this film is trying to teach us. You can never judge a work of art based upon your own personal prejudices. That's like judging the taste of a wedding cake based upon the rules of automobile design and construction. The two disciplines are unrelated. The only valid judgement for film is the heart, the state of one's soul. A pure soul, a pure heart, will see the meaning in film, especially THIS film. A corrupt heart and soul will see nothing of value, because the value relates and pertains to the heart, to the soul.

Obviously, I strongly recommend this film. As stated elsewhere, I never give 5 stars to any film other than those that prove themselves to be the very best works of art; that touch the heart and soul in the most profound way; that attain the very pinnacle of perfection. This film, Hugo, more than deserves 5 stars. It is a masterpiece of dream making, as Georges Méliès himself would so rightly have said.
One person found this helpful
R. SwanReviewed in the United States on December 17, 2018
5.0 out of 5 starsWonderful Movie with Surprising Depth
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This movie has tantalized me for quite some time and finally, I watched it. To say I was not disappointed is an understatement. Google Doogle first introduced me to the Ben Kingsley character and having some background, realizing the movie maker had been real added to the enjoyment of this movie. All the side characters were wonderfully done. My heart ached, I laughed and was alternately on the edge of my seat as scenes unfolded. Hugo's viewpoint of the world as a machine having no extra parts will remain with me. It's a beautiful thought, but you'll have to watch the movie to get the full understanding.
3 people found this helpful
Christopher A. ParrReviewed in the United States on April 27, 2021
5.0 out of 5 starsBeautifully, lovingly done
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Scorsese isn’t known for his children’s fare. He’s more at home on the mean streets of NYC. But, as of the production of this film, he had a tweenage daughter, so he identified with one of the protagonists in the story. I’ll not labor with story explanation here, rather I speak in favor of the 3D Scorsese employed. It was a first, for him, and he labored to do it justice, remembering the 3D craze of the 50s on which he cut his teeth. No flaming arrows to the noggin (that caused my baby brother to hide behind the seats and not come until Fort Ticonderoga was finished). Indeed, Sasha Baron Cohen’s character eschewed tossing a wooden leg at the camera as too frightening. Sacha was content with a leg brace. But the rest of the 3D was done splendidly and unobtrusively. Kudos for a dying art form!!
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