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New Kid by [Jerry Craft]
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New Kid Kindle & comiXology

4.7 out of 5 stars 6,194 ratings

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Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Gr 4-7-Jordan Banks is anxious about being the new kid at Riverdale, especially since he'd rather be going to art school. He's even more nervous when he realizes that, unlike in his Washington Heights neighborhood, at Riverdale, he's one of the few kids of color. Despite some setbacks, Jordan eventually makes a few friends and chronicles his experiences in his sketch pad. This is more than a story about being the new kid-it's a complex examination of the micro- and macroaggressions that Jordan endures from classmates and teachers. He is regularly mistaken for the other black kids at school. A teacher calls another black student by the wrong name and singles him out during discussions on financial aid. Even Jordan's supportive parents don't always understand the extent of the racism he faces. This book opens doors for additional discussion. Craft's illustrations are at their best during the vibrant full-page spreads. The art loses a bit of detail during crowd scenes, but the characters' emotions are always well conveyed. Jordan's black-and-white notebook drawings are the highlight of this work, combining effective social commentary with the protagonist's humorous voice. VERDICT Highly recommended for all middle grade shelves.-Gretchen Hardin, Sterling Municipal Library, Baytown, TXα(c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted. --This text refers to an alternate kindle_edition edition.

About the Author

Jerry Craft is the winner of the Newbery Medal for his graphic novel New Kid. He has worked on numerous picture books, graphic novels, and middle grade novels. Jerry is the creator of Mama’s Boyz, an award-winning syndicated comic strip. He has won five African American Literary Awards, and he is a cofounder of the Schomburg Center’s Annual Black Comic Book Festival. He received his BFA from the School of Visual Arts and now lives in Connecticut. Visit him online at www.jerrycraft.com.

--This text refers to an alternate kindle_edition edition.

Product details

  • ASIN ‏ : ‎ B078R4MWFX
  • Publisher ‏ : ‎ Quill Tree Books; 1st edition (February 5, 2019)
  • Publication date ‏ : ‎ February 5, 2019
  • Language ‏ : ‎ English
  • File size ‏ : ‎ 454725 KB
  • Text-to-Speech ‏ : ‎ Not enabled
  • Enhanced typesetting ‏ : ‎ Not Enabled
  • X-Ray ‏ : ‎ Not Enabled
  • Word Wise ‏ : ‎ Not Enabled
  • Print length ‏ : ‎ 256 pages
  • Lending ‏ : ‎ Not Enabled
  • Customer Reviews:
    4.7 out of 5 stars 6,194 ratings

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Customer reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
4.7 out of 5
6,194 global ratings
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Top reviews from the United States

Reviewed in the United States on July 21, 2020
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Reviewed in the United States on February 5, 2019
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Reviewed in the United States on March 12, 2020
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Reviewed in the United States on March 22, 2019
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Reviewed in the United States on February 1, 2020
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4.0 out of 5 stars Important and Necessary
By ricardo is reading on February 1, 2020
Massive congratulations to Jerry Craft for winning the Newbery for New Kid! A graphic novel winning the medal! We are kind of living through a Golden Age of children's fiction, aren't we? It's good to stop every once in a while to just look around and actually notice. It's the whole point of awards.⠀

New Kid follows Jordan Banks, a twelve-year-old kid about to start the seventh grade. A budding cartoonist, Jordan wishes for nothing more than to go to art school, but his parents, wishing him to have better opportunities than they had, decide to send him to a more affluent school. A prestigious private school, to be exact. A school where Jordan is one of the few kids of color. Being the new kid is hard enough, but this, in addition to coming from a more modest background than most of his peers, means dealing with a bunch of unwelcome challenges — not least of which being general ignorance and racism — as Jordan just tries to go about his days, trying to figure things out.⠀

I really enjoyed New Kid. While I was not a huge fan of the artwork itself, the story and the writing definitely won me over. I really loved — and admired — how it maintained a light and fun tone while also exploring some heavy themes. It's a deceptively casual book in this way. There are depictions of class difference, of code-switching as a person of color, of casual racism and microaggressions, of privilege and lack thereof — and they are all portrayed in the same easy-going manner. Underneath this layer of mellow, though, there's a current of frustration and exasperation that runs all the way through, which makes this casual story lose none of its pointed poignancy. Because being a person of color in this world sometimes means keeping your cool even during the most uncomfortable of times, even if you're a child.⠀

But these weighty subjects don't make up the whole of the story. Just as they don't make up the lives of the kids who have to deal with them. One of the central themes in New Kid has to do with Jordan's frustration with books about kids of color being extremely limited in scope: books about white kids can be about anything and still expected to be relatable; books about black kids can only be about Serious Issues and are expected to be read only by black kids. Books about white kids can be fun; books about black kids have to be severe and gritty. Jordan thinks this is extremely unfair nonsense. Because, yes, while kids like him may have to deal with more complicated situations than most others — at the end of the day they're also... just kids. Normal and goofy and beautiful and awkward and nerdy and clever kids who would love to do nothing more than just live and have fun and be happy and to see other kids like them doing likewise. This doesn't mean that books about Serious Issues are not important, only that reality is far more complex, and stories about said reality should reflect it accordingly. Because representation is important. This is what Jerry Craft does with New Kid, and does it elegantly. It's my favorite aspect of this story.

It's also a book that's just funny and clever, which is what instantly hooks you. Jordan and his group of friends are instantly likeable and relatable. The art, as I said, wasn't my favorite, but Craft's storytelling is clear and concise, and the book has great pacing because of it.⠀

It's another one of those books I wish I could give to my younger self. Which is something I often find myself saying about a lot of the kid's books I've recently read. I think that's an inevitable thought to have, though, as someone who spent their childhood reading nothing much at all, after reading a particularly great children's book. There's a sense of deprivation — of having missed out — and wanting to go back and fix that. It's bittersweet, but in a positive way, you know?⠀

I digress. ⠀

New Kid is a fine book. And it deserved to win the Newbery. And I can't wait to see what that means for the future of graphic novels and children's fiction in general.
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Reviewed in the United States on February 9, 2019
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5.0 out of 5 stars Exceptional graphic novel
By Karen on February 9, 2019
The art work, the microaggressions, the freezing sports moments, the "Mean Streets of Uptown" book truth- this story contains so much truth and heart and will stick with me for awhile. This is a must have for middle school shelves!
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Top reviews from other countries

Barb in London
5.0 out of 5 stars Fabulous first foray into the perspectives of others
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 30, 2020
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Helen Sofley
5.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful art, important topics
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 3, 2020
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Coco
4.0 out of 5 stars Very impressive, worth every penny
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 19, 2021
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L. Guillaume
5.0 out of 5 stars engaging, relatable and funny
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 15, 2020
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Trev11
5.0 out of 5 stars A book my son actually put his Nintendo switch down to read.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 31, 2021
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