The L Word

 (742)
7.62005TV-MA
The L Word is about lesbian life in Los Angeles. The show follows a group of friends - both gay and straight - through stories of career, family, inner struggle, friendship and romantic relationships.
Starring
Jennifer BealsErin DanielsLeisha Hailey
Genres
Drama
Subtitles
English [CC]
Audio languages
English

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  1. 1. Life, Loss, Leaving
    February 20, 2005
    55min
    TV-MA
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    The second season opens with Tina rebuffing Bette's attempts at reconciliation while Jenny prepares for an emotional farewell with Tim.
  2. 2. Lap Dance
    February 27, 2005
    54min
    TV-MA
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    Tina hires a famous lawyer to represent her in the split with Bette. Jenny has a serious heart-to-heart with Robin. Kit's purchase of The Planet is finalized.
  3. 3. Loneliest Number
    March 6, 2005
    56min
    TV-MA
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    Kit preps The Planet for its grand reopening. Shane becomes Jenny's new roommate and Bette's emotional tailspin continues.
  4. 4. Lynch Pin
    March 13, 2005
    58min
    TV-MA
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    Jenny and Shane search for a third roommate and choose Mark, a straight male very intrigued by the lesbian lifestyle, while Kit becomes attracted to a motivational self-help guru.
  5. 5. Labyrinth
    March 20, 2005
    55min
    TV-MA
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    Mark launches a new video project: taping Jenny and Shane. Bette and Tina's brief reunion is marred when Bette gets some bad professional news from Helena Peabody.
  6. 6. Lagrimas de Oro
    March 27, 2005
    51min
    TV-MA
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    Tina moves out and considers her attraction to Helena. Alice gives Dana an ultimatum but Tonya has a shock in store. Jenny and Carmen bond, encouraged by Shane.
  7. 7. Luminous
    April 3, 2005
    54min
    TV-MA
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    Alice and Dana tentatively begin dating, while Tina comes between Helena and her ex.
  8. 8. Loyal
    April 10, 2005
    57min
    TV-MA
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    Bette and Tina agree to forge a new relationship.
  9. 9. Late, Later, Latent
    April 17, 2005
    57min
    TV-MA
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    Alice's sex-toy request freaks out Dana. Jenny learns the truth about TV star Burr.
  10. 10. Land Ahoy
    April 24, 2006
    56min
    TV-MA
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    A lesbian cruise in the Caribbean proves eventful for Dana, Alice, Shane, Jenny and Carmen.
  11. 11. Loud & Proud
    May 1, 2005
    48min
    TV-MA
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    Against the backdrop of a gay-pride parade, shocking secrets are revealed about Dana's brother and Jenny's past.
  12. 12. L'Chaim
    May 8, 2005
    44min
    TV-MA
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    Bette moves her father, played by Emmy-nominated actor Ossie Davis, into her home for his final days.
  13. 13. Lacuna
    May 15, 2005
    56min
    TV-MA
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    Melvin's memorial service is attended by a surprise guest; Bette coaches Tina through what turns out to be an unexpectedly difficult labor and delivery.

More details

Directors
Daniel MinahanLynne StopkewichRose TrocheLisa CholodenkoBurr SteersJeremy PodeswaErnest DickersonAlison MacleanTony GoldwynTricia BrockJohn CurranIlene Chaiken
Supporting actors
Laurel HollomanMia KirshnerKatherine MoenningSarah ShahiPam GrierRachel Shelley
Producers
Rose LamElizabeth HunterSteve GolinLarry Kennar
Season year
2005
Network
Showtime
Purchase rights
Stream instantly Details
Format
Prime Video (streaming online video)
Devices
Available to watch on supported devices

Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars

742 global ratings

  1. 81% of reviews have 5 stars
  2. 9% of reviews have 4 stars
  3. 4% of reviews have 3 stars
  4. 1% of reviews have 2 stars
  5. 5% of reviews have 1 stars
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Top reviews from the United States

MermaidReviewed in the United States on May 2, 2012
5.0 out of 5 stars
Guilty Pleasure
Verified purchase
I don't watch a lot of TV, but I've really enjoyed watching Season 2 of the L Word. (I never saw Season 1...it wasn't available online when I started watching.) It was fairly easy to jump into the show not knowing the back story or all the characters. It took me a few episodes before I could keep Bette and Dana straight (no pun intended) because they sort of look alike to me, but now they look distinctly different to me.

I feel obligated to share that I am not a lesbian, but still really enjoy the show. It has some gratuitous sex scenes, but nothing I'm uncomfortable with It's definitely a "Mature Audiences" rating. I enjoy the show because it deals with relationships and lifes from a female perspective; not just a lesbian perspective, and it's so rare to come across a show or movie that is purely for women. I'm excited to watch the rest of the seasons. You don't have to be gay to like the show as some of the reviews make it seem.
9 people found this helpful
D. RobertsReviewed in the United States on April 20, 2008
4.0 out of 5 stars
Sappho would be proud
Verified purchase
At first, this series makes you (or most people, anyway?) feel a little like Alice in Wonderland. Everything that's in the "regular" world is transplanted into the realm of the lesbian lifestyle. We have: lesbian stalkers, lesbian love-triangles, lesbian womanizers, vindictive lesbians, altruistic lesbians, confused lesbians, lesbian couples who want to have babies & much more. Somewhat surprisingly, however, after watching the show for awhile, all of the above stops being so strange and it blurs into the rest of the "regular" stuff in the world. That, I believe, is one of the focal points of the show.

One of the best ways to be introduced to the show is to have an overview of the main characters.

***Bette (Jennifer Beals) is a Type A personality, no-nonsense Ivy league graduate who is a curator of an L.A. art museum. Both her lifestyle as well as her profession draws the ire (not to mention persecution) of religious fundies. Beals is the Sarah Jessica Parker of "L Word" as she's the one actress whom we'd like to see strip down who never does so.

***Tina (Laurel Holloman) is a coy woman who wants to also be a mother. She always tends to have domineering women who try to seduce her - such as Bette, for one.

***Dana (Erin Daniels) is a professional tennis player who is an up & comer in the rankings. She is not as big a name as Marina Navratolova, so season one sees her struggle with keeping her personal & public life separate. By season 2, however, she has found a sponser (Subaru) that allows her to use her sexual orientation to her advantage.

***Alice (Leisha Halley) is the comic relief of the show, and she's also my favorite character. While her hairstyles are not always overly becoming, she's still absolutely adorable. She & Dana team up for some of the hottest scenes in the show. Alice also keeps a "matrix" on her wall @ home which tries to keep up with all the lesbian interactions in L.A. Whether she is straight, bi or lez, Alice would be an absolute BLAST to hang out with - regardless of your gender!

***Jenny (Mia Kirshner) is an import from the midwest, and it's evident that she feels out-of-sorts on the west coast. She moved to L.A. to be with her boyfriend, but she found herself to be sexually confused. She finds that she is bisexual (sort-of?), but more than anything else she is a sort of lesbian loose-cannon. With her gorgeous, mysterious eyes she is arguably the most visually stunning woman on the show (although I much preferred her w/the long hair she sported in season 1).

****My 2 least-favorite characters are Shane (Katherine Moehnning) and Kit (Pam Grier). Shane is a hairdresser who seems to have a phobia about combing her hair. She is a sort of female Don Juan (Donna Juan?) who can "score" with just about any woman at will. Why this is so, I have no idea. To me she looks like a female Johnny Depp. Kit, meanwhile, is Bette's straight sister who is not nearly so cerebral as Bette is. In truth, I find her character to be somewhat superfluous to the show, and I tend to fast-forward through her main scenes.

Many people have compared The L Word with [[ASIN:B000ASDFJU Sex and the City - The Complete Series (Collector's Giftset)]]. I don't think this is a comparison which should be pushed too far as there are some major differences in the timbre of the shows. First off, SITC is a lighthearted sitcom while L Word is a drama. L Word is NOT simply another SITC with a "twist" where the women are homosexual instead of heterosexual.

Secondly, the theme of homosexuality itself is not considered in a thoughtful way in SITC. Carrie has a gay friend named Stanford in SITC, but he's a buffoon who is not to be taken seriously. When 2 of the characters in SITC either engage in or think of engaging in lesbian encounters, it's in a recreational sense. The L Word, meanwhile, is about lesbian RELATIONSHIPS rather than simply some sort of recreational vehicle for women to find joy.

With that in mind, those who are looking for every episode to be filled with one steamy male-fantasy lez scene after another are likely to be a bit perturbed. There's no question that there ARE some smokin' hot scenes, but they go along w/the story as opposed to being contrived.

One of the most refreshing things about The L Word is the fact that, like [[ASIN:B0009Q0EMY Girl Play]], it's not a show that is about male-bashing. As a man, that's one thing I was wondering about when I picked up the first 2 seasons (I'd never seen an episode on SHOWTIME). Surprisingly enough, it doesn't even take sides in the straight vs. lez lifestyles. It's not a "recruiting tool" to coerce young women to test-out the lesbian lifestyle. Rather, it demonstrates that being a lesbian doesn't "simplify" things @ all. Our lesbian friends have to face off against the same set of relationship difficulties that all people do, be they straight or not straight.

Lastly, those persons (like me!) who are looking for Gina Holden's famous scene with Jennifer Beals, be sure to check out episode 4, disc 1 of season 2. It's good that this show was made for SHOWTIME so it could bypass the FCC. It simply would not have worked if they had tried to make it "G Rated." I'm hoping they never try to water it down into a syndicated show on a regular cable channel, as they did with SITC on TBS.
6 people found this helpful
SkailahReviewed in the United States on January 30, 2019
5.0 out of 5 stars
Fun series for women of all walks of life.
Verified purchase
A frontrunner in liberating stereotypes in this fun and sassy cable classic.
Timeless.
One person found this helpful
TSweatReviewed in the United States on January 13, 2020
5.0 out of 5 stars
Great show
Verified purchase
I love this show. Played great and I still own in pristine condition.
One person found this helpful
Sen T. NgoReviewed in the United States on July 9, 2006
4.0 out of 5 stars
Worth a look, but still disappointing
Verified purchase
I purcahsed Season 1 of The L Word on a whim after passing it in a store one day, and recalling both the controversy and glowing reviews surrounding it when it was first screened on television. As a straight young woman of 19 who has had very little contact with homosexual people throughout her life, I found it to be a lovely surprise - a refreshing combination of great acting from a well-rounded cast, characters that were sufficiently fleshed out in order for the viewer to grow to care about them, and clever writing. I found that I was able to relate to these characters and their trials and tribulations despite our differences in sexual orientation. Perhaps most importantly, Season 1 of The L Word contained the perfect amount of both humour and poignance - a quality that I love in all of my favourite TV shows.

Having said that, it's sad to say that I can't say the same about Season 2. While I will most likely support and watch this show for however long it continues to be on air, Season 2 takes a strange turn. Many of the characters that I originally supported and in whom I invested my interest suddenly appear to be caricatures, resorted to being used simply for laughs (note: Dana and Alice). Furthermore, the new additions to the cast are either given very little screen time (as in the case of Carmen, played by the gorgeous Sarah Shahi) or portrayed as simply one-dimensional (as in the case of Helena, played by the beautiful Rachel Shelley). As a result, several storylines seem either under-developed (Carmen and Shane) or simply bizarre (Helena and Tina) - too under-developed and bizarre respectively to get the audience to actually care. My girl-crush from Season 1, Kate Moennig, is reduced to a big sullen pile of sulk this season, and while I can't say I'm too keen on the change of hair, I still think she's hot, adore her voice and wish she she'd been given more with which to work as I believe Moennig has the acting chops.

On the upside, Mia Kirshner continues to do a great job with a difficult character. Whilst Jenny grated on my nerves during Season 1, I've grown to really appreciate her throughout Season 2 as Kirshner continues to reveal her character's complexity (although I could definitely do without the pretentious flashbacks and horrendously misplaced carnival scenes). Jennifer Beals is as wonderful as ever, making the audience empathise with a woman who, essentially, embodies many unlikeable qualities. And physically, Beals is as stunning as ever. Pam Grier offers solid support in the storyline with Bette and Kit's father, providing some of the most heartbreaking scenes of the season.

Another negative about Season 2 is the change in its use of music. I do not care for the new opening credits at all (they don't fit the tone of the show in the slightest), nor do I care for the overuse of the group BETTY, who - incidentally - provides us with the 'music' that accompanies the opening credits. Whilst Season 1 offered up gems by Damien Rice, Leonard Cohen and Joseph Arthur, Season 2 gives us a lot of BETTY. And that is not necessarily a good thing. In fact, the substantial change in music only works to make the marked absence of the poignancy and melancholy that I so loved in Season 1 all that more noticable.

On the whole, Season 2 does not live up to Season 1's promise, although it still provides - for the most part - interesting and riveting viewing. I look forward to the release of the Season 3 DVD set to see if it is able to redeem itself. If not, The L Word will always have my support on the strength and promise of its premiere season, if not my absolute adoration.
15 people found this helpful
Jennifer1084Reviewed in the United States on June 8, 2020
5.0 out of 5 stars
Really like
Verified purchase
Really like the show
taneesha B.Reviewed in the United States on April 21, 2021
5.0 out of 5 stars
Good buy
Verified purchase
Good
JustMyOpinionReviewed in the United States on July 6, 2008
1.0 out of 5 stars
Buy Season 1 only
Verified purchase
This show went downhill in a hurry when it summarily dismissed its most interesting character, Marina. I watched the first season and was so intrigued with her. Then the first episode of the second season...well, did they really think we would buy that this smart, sexy and intelligent woman would try to KILL herself over of all people..the dysfunctional Jenny? I got half-way through the second season and found myself bored. The L Word really messed up when the let go its only true woman in the the lot of girls. What a waste of a tremendous talent.
2 people found this helpful
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