The Passenger

Season 1
 (290)6.42015TV-14
Jean-Hugues Anglade (Braquo) stars in this psychological thriller. The body of a man is found at the Saint-Jean train station in Bordeaux - the first in a series of murders inspired by Greek mythology. Police captain Anaïs Chatelet enlists the help of psychiatrist Mathias Freire to help catch the killer, but as the investigation proceeds each discovers dark personal secrets about the other.
Genres
SuspenseDramaInternational
Subtitles
None available
Audio languages
Français

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  1. 1. Minotaur
    November 5, 2015
    48min
    TV-14
    Audio languages
    Français
    When an amnesiac suspect is found at a murder scene, police captain Anaïs Chatelet turns a local psychiatrist for answers.
  2. 2. Prometheus
    November 5, 2015
    50min
    TV-14
    Audio languages
    Français
    Anaïs consults Mathias after a second body is found and an assassin targets Bonfils.
  3. 3. Icarus
    November 12, 2015
    48min
    TV-14
    Audio languages
    Français
    Mathias escapes to Marseille in search of information about his past.
  4. 4. Uranus
    November 12, 2015
    49min
    TV-14
    Audio languages
    Français
    Anaïs returns to Bordeaux as Mathias traces the paintings to an apartment in Paris.
  5. 5. Oedipus
    November 19, 2015
    50min
    TV-14
    Audio languages
    Français
    The trail of the mysterious Sasha leads Anaïs and Mathias to a speed dating club in Paris.
  6. 6. Orpheus
    November 19, 2015
    47min
    TV-14
    Audio languages
    Français
    Anaïs confronts the Machiavellian General Garsac and Mathias races to discover the IRIS Clinic's secrets.

More details

Season year
2015
Network
MHz Networks
Purchase rights
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Format
Prime Video (streaming online video)
Devices
Available to watch on supported devices

Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars

290 global ratings

  1. 55% of reviews have 5 stars
  2. 22% of reviews have 4 stars
  3. 3% of reviews have 3 stars
  4. 9% of reviews have 2 stars
  5. 12% of reviews have 1 stars
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Top reviews from the United States

NatsReviewed in the United States on December 29, 2018
5.0 out of 5 stars
The Passenger is finally on BluRay!!!!
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I just received my copy of the Powerhouse Films bluray of The Passenger a few days ago and havent yet seen the extra material, but the film looks stunning!
I thought I would be stuck forever with the DVD, so am so happy to see this film cleaned up and remastered on bluray as it deserves.
The picture quality on this disk is probably the best you will ever see outside a theater of this somewhat forgotten about Antonioni masterpiece. I have waited a long time for this.
I will not comment about the film it's self, as many others have already done an outstanding job on their reviews, but it's one of my favorite works of cinema art.
If you love this film as much as I do, buy this while you can because it's a limited edition of 5,000.
When they are gone, that's it!!
8 people found this helpful
Glo in PhillyReviewed in the United States on August 1, 2020
5.0 out of 5 stars
Great plot
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I thoroughly enjoyed this film. I love foreign films. The plots seem to be so much more intriguing than some of the garbage Hollywood is peddling these days. And I love being able to 'tour' foreign lands and get a glimpse of what it's like to live there from a comfortable sofa in my livingroom. That said, The Passenger was quite a journey. I was so captivated that I watched the entire set, almost 5 hours, on one rainy Saturday afternoon, even foregoing my favorite TV shows. The actors portray very convincing characters, the settings are beautiful and the plot keeps evolving until the final reveal at the end. I did feel like it ended a bit too soon. I would have liked to see how Anglade's character continued to evolve under the circumstances, so another 2 or 3 episodes would have been a nice wrap-up.
3 people found this helpful
Glenn RichardsReviewed in the United States on January 3, 2013
4.0 out of 5 stars
The failed search for meaning
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This 1975 film exhibits the distinctive style of noted director Michelangelo Antonioni (1912-2007). Billed as an international romantic thriller, it is actually more of a psychological study. Antonioni's films dealt with the themes of internal emptiness, and search for purpose. As such, they were often slow-moving. To its credit, The Passenger features more of a consistent plot. Jack Nicholson plays a tired, burned-out journalist, disaffected with his career, and hoping for something more meaningful. When presented with an opportunity, he exchanges his identity for that of a dead man, only to become caught up in a sequence of events he cannot control. Temporarily free of his earlier life, he makes no effort to build a new one. Undercut by his own indecisiveness, he is unable to create his own sense of purpose. Confronted with new options and facing very real dangers, he does not rise to the occasion, but remains curiously passive, allowing himself to be swept along by outside forces. The film is visually quite striking, alternately beautiful and stark, maintaining a discrete distance from the central character.
9 people found this helpful
Elizabeth J. BrownReviewed in the United States on September 12, 2006
4.0 out of 5 stars
"Beautifully hypnotic"
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Michaelangelo Antonioni's 1975 film is dreamlike and mysterious. On one level it is about the literal danger in stealing someone else's identity. That premise alone presents numerous dramatic possibilities, but "The Passenger" goes much further, to become a haunting meditation on rootlessness and ennui. It examines the paradox of seemingly endless freedom gradually becoming a prison with only one means of escape.

David Locke (Jack Nicholson, in one of his greatest performances), is a photojournalist working in North Africa. Out of nothing more than boredom, apparently, he steals the identity of a dead man, the only other guest in his hotel. The man, known only as Mr. Robertson, is barely known to Locke. They have had one conversation, and Robertson has said little more than that he is a businessman who travels all over the world and has no family.

Once Locke becomes Robertson, he begins meeting the appointments in Robertson's datebook. It becomes his own personal Michelin guide and sends him all over Europe to gorgeous locations, filmed to their greatest advantage by Luciano Tovoli. In Munich, Locke learns that he is an arms dealer. But, as Jack Nicholson notes in his wry commentary on the DVD, "at least he knows he's selling to the rebels."

Locke keeps all the appointments in the datebook, but the people he is supposed to meet abruptly stop showing up. He is mystified, confused, bewildered. There is trouble and fear in the silence that seems to meet him everywhere. Along the way he meets a young student, "The Girl," played enigmatically by Maria Schneider. She speaks in epigrams, is intrigued by Locke and views the life he has adopted as something of a game.

If we're not who we know ourselves to be, who are we? This is the question Antonioni repeatedly raises, and wisely never answers. One more than one occasion, Locke asks the girl, "what the ---- are you doing here with me?" Her first response is the most telling: "which 'me'?" Repeatedly he pushes her away, whether to protect her from himself, his alter ego or those who might be after either one of them, we can't say. But she remains cleverly steadfast.

There is very little dialogue and not a great deal of action. But the feeling of menace and dread grows more powerful with each reel. And the payoff -- and it's a big one -- comes in the final seven minutes, with a single shot that is justifiably famous. It neatly ties up all the loose ends, although you may not realize it on first viewing. There are technical questions about how this shot was accomplished which the DVD commentaries answer. As with many scenes in many Antonioni movies, the final shot of "The Passenger" appears to say nothing while saying everything. It's just remarkable. No other word will do.

I did not find screenwriter Mark Peploe's commentary to be particulary interesting. He talks too fast, he backtracks, he gets ahead of himself. He has a female friend with him who had no involvement in the film; she doesn't get the chance to say much and when she raises (good) questions, Peploe fails to answer them. I did not finish listening.

Jack Nicholson's commentary -- which I believe he says is the first he's ever done for a DVD -- is quite good. He has owned the rights to "The Passenger" for many years, and it was his choice to re-release it to theatres in late 2005, and then to release it on DVD. Nicholson takes a great deal of pride in having worked with Antonioni. (He remains the highest-caliber actor to have done so.) Jack sounds like he has one foot in the grave and the other on a banana peel, but listen to the words. He's not intrusive, he chooses his words carefully, and he displays great intelligence and sly wit. It is he who says "The Passenger" is "beautifully hypnotic", and he is correct.
14 people found this helpful
MoldyoldieReviewed in the United States on May 20, 2006
5.0 out of 5 stars
Book Passage On This Unique Trip
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I've been wanting to give The Passenger a second chance since first seeing it almost thirty years ago -- a screening by a now long-defunct local film society at the rustic decades-old Footliters Theater in downtown Cadillac, Michigan, the erstwhile venue for the local community theater troupe and since lost to an electrical fire. Either the print or projection was awful while the sound system just plain stunk!

This new DVD edition has the "feel" of age (I could never understand why Antonioni used dark titles, same as on his Blow-Up) but is nonetheless very watchable (and listenable!) with brilliant color saturation and nary a noticeable scratch.

Needless to say, a keen sense of "place" and the emotional "distance" we keep from protagonist/reporter David Locke (Jack Nicholson) amidst his developing boredom and burn-out are brilliantly rendered through Antonioni's trademark cinematic sensibility. We see and feel Locke's need for change and are held rapt as he carries out his impromptu plan for self-reinvention. In my opinion, this consistent theme of Antonioni's is as well-performed and technically executed as in any of his films.

From the North African desert to London to Germany and finally to Spain, Locke embraces his newfound identity through unintended political intrigue and a search by his wife and former colleague (who believe his former self to be dead!) while sharing his exploit with a young fellow soulmate and nameless lover (Maria Schneider). The trip is both fascinating and spellbinding.

The denouement is something to behold, not only from a technical standpoint (which is extraordinary!) but from the sheer emotional dispatch we feel upon Locke's ultimate realization. The slowly diminishing "distance" from him we were feeling to that point utterly collapses! We're left feeling strangely as one with Locke, but more detached than ever from a mostly inert and indifferent world.

Any fan of Antonioni's renowned Italian trilogy (L'avventura, La Notte, and L'eclisse) or his wonderfully enigmatic English language masterpiece Blow-Up will certainly enjoy this. I also wouldn't hesitate to recommend The Passenger to the Antonioni uninitiate who wants a more accessible entry in which to explore a unique cinematic vision and language. Though I've yet to hear the commentary track from the screenwriter Mark Peploe and journalist Aurora Irvine, that of the seemingly world-weary yet self-satisfied modern-day Jack Nicholson was fun to hear if not overly insightful.

One of these days I may just give Antonioni's much maligned Zabriskie Point a "second chance"...one of these days.
14 people found this helpful
E. WeedReviewed in the United States on May 18, 2006
5.0 out of 5 stars
It's also about beautiful images...
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"Antonioni" and "alienation" seem inextricably intertwined. That's not all there is to it. I've seen this film about once every 10 years since it came out around 1975. (The DVD is a good-looking print, by the way.) I've loved it, and been excited by it, every time.

Excited about a film about alienation? Ah, but I think there's more to it, much more. Certainly alienation, morality, emptiness, the complexities of modern existence, are all issues of concern to Antonioni, and he's said so. But he also clearly loves the beauty of the "moving picture," so much so that he seems to get quite happily lost in it. And, in the end, at least for this viewer, that's what makes this film such a success. It is visually captivating. The plot, such as it is, quickly becomes of secondary importance, except as a vehicle to raise more questions than it ever answers (as is typical with Antonioni). Instead, you see the world, events, and the passage of time, through Antonioni's eyes. And he is a wonderful guide.

Antonioni's rhythm is slow. That bothers some people. The looseness of the plot, the ambiguity, the lack of explanatory narrative, are all things to be prepared for. The images are what count. At least, that's how it's worked for this viewer. With those qualifiers in mind, strongly recommended.
15 people found this helpful
Thomas K BakerReviewed in the United States on September 15, 2019
1.0 out of 5 stars
Main audio is missing!
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I received the first copy which had a sound defect. There is no audio on the main feature, only audio for the voice over commentaries by actors and directo. I tried to get it to work on three different DVD players, no sound. I ordered a replacement , same problem on the second copy. I tried returning both copies for a refund but the system only allowed me to return one. I was never refunded the for the first copy, just got charged again for the “replacement” which doesn’t work. So far I have been charged $80+ for a movie with no sound. I’ll never order another movie from Scamazon.
green manalishiReviewed in the United States on March 13, 2008
4.0 out of 5 stars
The Great Escape
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It's hard to judge this movie. It's meditative and windswept and transfers the feeling of traveling to remote places where you are an unknown amongst people you do not know. Its premise was more intriguing than the actual experience of watching the story unfold however, which is slow indeed. Being a traveler and amateur photography buff myself, I have great patience for looking at travel photos and find National Geographic magazine interesting, if not for the reading than at least for the photography of exotic places and the work of talented photographers. My girlfriend however doesn't have that same love of pictures and won't spend much time critcally analyzing what makes a picture good or bad..

So how to judge this movie becomes the issue for me. This is no high speed ride. It's fine cinematography with a few shots that are probably more famous than the movie (she in back of the car as the trees go by her is an incredibly beautiful visual image). The story again while conceptually interesting didn't go as deep for me as it seemed to for other reviewers. While forgivable, I didn't find the scenes where Jack interacts with the arms buyers extremely likely - he obviously looked like he didn't know what was going on and I didn't wholly buy their complete oblivion to this.. I liked the girl. She was a real work of art. Her presence in the movie made about as much sense as anything else, but I was glad she was there. It was a fun "what if" study. What if a man went to the extreme of getting rid of his whole history in this way? This idea is probably attractive to most people from time to time in their lives, so there's no question that the idea appeals. The next question is would such a thing be possible, and would it play out something like the way it is depicted in "The Passenger"? My gut reation to that is probably "no". But these are not the most important questions - like one of the interviewees says to Jack when he asks him loaded questions before an interview. The questions tell you more about the asker than the subject questioned. For me, the question is what makes this a good movie? Is it a good movie or a great movie? The answer will depend on the criterion that you bring.

If being intellectually or intuitionally intrigued is a condition for your idea of a great movie, then.. you will have to answer whether or not it does that for you. For me, there were moments. Definite moments. There was always this kind of vast isolation, and mild uneasiness wrapped up in a sense of possibility that didn't seem likely to produce. But the journey seemed a worthwhile one just for the sake of being what it was - an attempt to escape. Chances are, our watching these movies is nothing less than that same urge, on some level. Thus, the protagonists story has meaning and was worthwhile for me. Other things too, make it worthwhile. Antonioni's rendering of the story - the scenery and some of the scenes were worthwhile. One I liked - near the end, a little girl is casually blowing a bubble as Jack is walking by, and that pink bubble just gets bigger and bigger, but before it pops - the shot stops. The concept of the movie, the subdued loveliness of the actress very much a part of the Spanish landscape, the moments of sparse dialogue where brilliance occasionally flashes through - I tip my hat to all these things - but what keeps me from giving this movie 5 stars is that it didn't succeed in helping ME escape. And while the ending was fitting and somewhat ironic, it didn't blow me away content wise. And let me also say that while there are some good shots in this movie camerawise, there are also many that go on long enough to test your endurance. So much so, that I could go look outside my window for ten minutes and have a similar emotional reaction. Not usually what I go to the movies for. So, all things considered, the movie'll probably be even more interesting for viewers after they've seen it, should they care to think about it, rather than while they are undergoing the actual movie.
4 people found this helpful
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