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Answer:
These are IEC (International Electrotechnical Committee)
standards. They provide broad standards for all tapes,
and end the need to align a deck for an individual tape. … see more
These are IEC (International Electrotechnical Committee)
standards. They provide broad standards for all tapes,
and end the need to align a deck for an individual tape.
Type 1 is for normal "iron oxide" tapes (Fe2O3), Type 2
is for high-bias "chromium oxide" tapes (CrO2), Type 3
(obsolete) is for FeCr (ferric chrome), and Type 4 is
for Fe (Metal). Type 2 tapes tend to be more expensive
than type 1, and type 4 tapes are the most expensive.
This is because type 2 tapes tend to have less noise and
flatter high frequency response than type 1, and type 4
tapes tend to have even flatter highs and even less noise.

Some Type 1 tapes are more expensive than other Type 2 tapes,
and may be worth the extra price. More expensive tapes come
in better shells, have better lubrication, fewer dropouts,
smoother frequency response, and better uniformity from tape
to tape. Even though the types imply a particular tape
formulations, the type really refers to the tape performance.
For example, some iron oxide tapes have an unusual oxide
formulation with very small grains that conforms to the type
2 standard better than the type 1 standard. These tapes
will be labeled type 2, but may not have any chrome in them.

Most modern cassette recorders sense the tape type by the
holes in the back of the housing and adjust bias and
equalization to compensate for the differences. A few
top cassette recorders (the Revox and several Nakamichis)
automatically align to a particular tape by recording test
tones and then setting their own equalization.

In practice, each brand and model tape is slightly different.
For the very best recordings, adjust your recorder for the
tape you use most, or buy the tape which works best in your
recorder. Manufacturers adjust each recorder for a specific
tape at the factory. So the best tape might be the one
referenced in the recorder owner's manual. In a recording
studio, it is common to align the bias and equalization for
the specific tape used, and stick with that tape.

Taken from : http://stason.org/TULARC/entertainment/audio/general/14-24 see less
These are IEC (International Electrotechnical Committee)
standards. They provide broad standards for all tapes,
and end the need to align a deck for an individual tape.
Type 1 is for normal "iron oxide" tapes (Fe2O3), Type 2
is for high-bias "chromium oxide" tapes (CrO2), Type 3
(obsolete) is for FeCr (ferric chrome), and Type 4 is
for Fe (Metal). Type 2 tapes tend to be more expensive
than type 1, and type 4 tapes are the most expensive.
This is because type 2 tapes tend to have less noise and
flatter high frequency response than type 1, and type 4
tapes tend to have even flatter highs and even less noise.

Some Type 1 tapes are more expensive than other Type 2 tapes,
and may be worth the extra price. More expensive tapes come
in better shells, have better lubrication, fewer dropouts,
smoother frequency response, and better uniformity from tape
to tape. Even though the types imply a particular tape
formulations, the type really refers to the tape performance.
For example, some iron oxide tapes have an unusual oxide
formulation with very small grains that conforms to the type
2 standard better than the type 1 standard. These tapes
will be labeled type 2, but may not have any chrome in them.

Most modern cassette recorders sense the tape type by the
holes in the back of the housing and adjust bias and
equalization to compensate for the differences. A few
top cassette recorders (the Revox and several Nakamichis)
automatically align to a particular tape by recording test
tones and then setting their own equalization.

In practice, each brand and model tape is slightly different.
For the very best recordings, adjust your recorder for the
tape you use most, or buy the tape which works best in your
recorder. Manufacturers adjust each recorder for a specific
tape at the factory. So the best tape might be the one
referenced in the recorder owner's manual. In a recording
studio, it is common to align the bias and equalization for
the specific tape used, and stick with that tape.

Taken from : http://stason.org/TULARC/entertainment/audio/general/14-24

Piggerfly Productions, LLC
Seller · September 28, 2017
  • 1
    vote

    votes
Answer:
As I recall, two blank tapes are included. At least that's how many are on my computer desk.
John F.
· March 1, 2017
  • 0
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    votes
Answer:
type 1
Sprague Team
Seller · May 21, 2017
  • 0
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    votes
Answer:
45 PER SIDE
Carolyn H. Williams
· July 11, 2018
  • 0
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    votes
Answer:
I ordered these but was unable to use with the old tape recorders my elementary school owned. They just wouldn't play at all - even though the recorders were in working condition!
kwaldo62
· August 5, 2015
  • 0
    vote

    votes
Answer:
It doesn't say on the packaging. Most likely older stock.
Rizzosmarket
Seller · July 8, 2020
  • 0
    vote

    votes
Answer:
Yes they can be recorded over with no problem. Eventually, due to mechanical degradation of the tape surface, due to playback or recording over, there will be some degradation, but this is usually negligible until hundreds of passes have been made. BTW, video tapes are a different story, they usually show signs of re-r… see more Yes they can be recorded over with no problem. Eventually, due to mechanical degradation of the tape surface, due to playback or recording over, there will be some degradation, but this is usually negligible until hundreds of passes have been made. BTW, video tapes are a different story, they usually show signs of re-recording degradation after the first rerecording. see less Yes they can be recorded over with no problem. Eventually, due to mechanical degradation of the tape surface, due to playback or recording over, there will be some degradation, but this is usually negligible until hundreds of passes have been made. BTW, video tapes are a different story, they usually show signs of re-recording degradation after the first rerecording.
Precycled
Seller · January 27, 2020
  • 0
    vote

    votes
Answer:
Yep, standard size audio cassettes. Thank you
Box Sender
Seller · July 28, 2020