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Answer:
VALUABLE COMMENT ON CLAMPING VOLTAGE RATINGS:

The 120+40 volt rating refers to RMS voltages and is what the suppresor clamps the spike down to, after it is activated. It is not the "kick-in" voltage, which is somewhere from 300-600 volts peak. … see more
VALUABLE COMMENT ON CLAMPING VOLTAGE RATINGS:

The 120+40 volt rating refers to RMS voltages and is what the suppresor clamps the spike down to, after it is activated. It is not the "kick-in" voltage, which is somewhere from 300-600 volts peak.

Furthermore it is misleading because surge ratings given are in PEAK voltages, which are 1.414 time higher than RMS voltage.

The point. Get a device kicks-in,and is rated from 330-400 volts across the Hot-Neutral leg and not higher than 400 volts across the other two legs to ground, for the best protection.

The latest trend in surge protectors show the Joule ratings going up, which is good, but the clamping voltages also going up, which is bad.

What good is a tanker fire truck carrying a billion gallons of water if it gets to your house after it has already burnt down? This is analogous to the joule & clamping-voltage ratings

PS: I taught electronics in technical colleges & in industry for 25 years. see less
VALUABLE COMMENT ON CLAMPING VOLTAGE RATINGS:

The 120+40 volt rating refers to RMS voltages and is what the suppresor clamps the spike down to, after it is activated. It is not the "kick-in" voltage, which is somewhere from 300-600 volts peak.

Furthermore it is misleading because surge ratings given are in PEAK voltages, which are 1.414 time higher than RMS voltage.

The point. Get a device kicks-in,and is rated from 330-400 volts across the Hot-Neutral leg and not higher than 400 volts across the other two legs to ground, for the best protection.

The latest trend in surge protectors show the Joule ratings going up, which is good, but the clamping voltages also going up, which is bad.

What good is a tanker fire truck carrying a billion gallons of water if it gets to your house after it has already burnt down? This is analogous to the joule & clamping-voltage ratings

PS: I taught electronics in technical colleges & in industry for 25 years.

Bard
· November 5, 2021
  • 12
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It does lay flat against the electrical outlet, I have a shelf unit in front of it and there is no conflict, although for safety reasons I would not push furniture too closely up against it.
SUZANNA RIEDL
· February 27, 2014
  • 12
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Except for the cheapest devices, other surge protectors just have a "protected" light that goes out if the surge protection fails, but the surge protector continues to pass power. I would much rather have it cut the power than to have to crawl around the equipment to keep checking to see if I am still protected. If y… see more Except for the cheapest devices, other surge protectors just have a "protected" light that goes out if the surge protection fails, but the surge protector continues to pass power. I would much rather have it cut the power than to have to crawl around the equipment to keep checking to see if I am still protected. If you are worried about running the equipment in an emergency and want to risk it, keep a cheap power strip handy.That is no worse than running with one of the others with blown protection see less Except for the cheapest devices, other surge protectors just have a "protected" light that goes out if the surge protection fails, but the surge protector continues to pass power. I would much rather have it cut the power than to have to crawl around the equipment to keep checking to see if I am still protected. If you are worried about running the equipment in an emergency and want to risk it, keep a cheap power strip handy.That is no worse than running with one of the others with blown protection
Terri Solomon
· July 30, 2019
  • 11
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Just bought this. Seems odd that distance between screw holes is 116mm. Even odder that their conversion to inches is "4.54?".
Vinal
· April 12, 2017
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The 320J has 4 hanger holes that will let it be hung in 4 different positions.
Jerald Ethridge
· January 29, 2014
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Yes, there are places in the back to hang onto nails.
Amazon Customer
· March 15, 2014
  • 3
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I think the cord is about 6feet. It is pretty long and we have several of them in both our office and at home. Great addition!!! Laurel
Laurel F.
· October 27, 2014
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8 feet long. I love the length of it.
Edward Regalado
· July 24, 2014
  • 2
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This product will support the RG-6 co-ax (black, white) cable from the Cable TV provider. The Ethernet cables are telephone cable like, but larger in diameter. Therefore telephone cables to phone are RJ-15 and internet cables to computers are RJ-45. The short answer is yes, it will connect to CAT-5 and CAT-5e Ethern… see more This product will support the RG-6 co-ax (black, white) cable from the Cable TV provider. The Ethernet cables are telephone cable like, but larger in diameter. Therefore telephone cables to phone are RJ-15 and internet cables to computers are RJ-45. The short answer is yes, it will connect to CAT-5 and CAT-5e Ethernet cables (grey, blue).
The long answer is this product only filters out over voltage (transients, stray electromagnetic leakage), depending upon the frequencies that a particular network requires and uses as its "standard operational threshold". Since the filtering only affects crosstalk in everyday telephone and cable services it should have little interference between the surge suppressor and the devices connected to it. Although Time Warner Technicians claim that using a surge suppressor affects their Substations from reading the cable box convertor (channel changer). That is true to some extent as with Covad on the West Coast USA. Minor differences in voltage changes can cause "drifting" in some digital logic controlled appliances.
Have successfully used this product since the early 1990s with CAT-5 (Ethernet), CAT-5e (Ethernet), RG-6 (cable TV), regular land line telephone
with no problems. This is a historically proven reliable product. Recommend this brand over many other brands. see less
This product will support the RG-6 co-ax (black, white) cable from the Cable TV provider. The Ethernet cables are telephone cable like, but larger in diameter. Therefore telephone cables to phone are RJ-15 and internet cables to computers are RJ-45. The short answer is yes, it will connect to CAT-5 and CAT-5e Ethernet cables (grey, blue).
The long answer is this product only filters out over voltage (transients, stray electromagnetic leakage), depending upon the frequencies that a particular network requires and uses as its "standard operational threshold". Since the filtering only affects crosstalk in everyday telephone and cable services it should have little interference between the surge suppressor and the devices connected to it. Although Time Warner Technicians claim that using a surge suppressor affects their Substations from reading the cable box convertor (channel changer). That is true to some extent as with Covad on the West Coast USA. Minor differences in voltage changes can cause "drifting" in some digital logic controlled appliances.
Have successfully used this product since the early 1990s with CAT-5 (Ethernet), CAT-5e (Ethernet), RG-6 (cable TV), regular land line telephone
with no problems. This is a historically proven reliable product. Recommend this brand over many other brands.

Viper Pilot
· December 29, 2014
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Answer:
All are controlled by the off/On switch
Amazon Customer
· July 1, 2014