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Showing 11-20 of 46 questions
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Answer:
All eight pins are present for either CAT5 or CAT6 cabeling.
Rex Roper
· January 25, 2018
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I would agree that it would be hard to say the true cause. However, I purchased this unit after moving into the mountains and had two routers cooked when lightning struck my wireless internet antenna. After I got this device I quit having to replace routers. Honestly this is a great device that has worked for more t… see more I would agree that it would be hard to say the true cause. However, I purchased this unit after moving into the mountains and had two routers cooked when lightning struck my wireless internet antenna. After I got this device I quit having to replace routers. Honestly this is a great device that has worked for more than one surge. I can think of two occasions over the summer when this device saved my network. I think it's best to put inline with external mounted wireless antennas. see less I would agree that it would be hard to say the true cause. However, I purchased this unit after moving into the mountains and had two routers cooked when lightning struck my wireless internet antenna. After I got this device I quit having to replace routers. Honestly this is a great device that has worked for more than one surge. I can think of two occasions over the summer when this device saved my network. I think it's best to put inline with external mounted wireless antennas.
Andrew
· October 8, 2013
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Just the module. The chassis is a separate purchase. Most of these are drop ship from APC so plan on a long time for delivery most likely.
Cybernaut Industria
· December 22, 2018
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Answer:
802.3 covers POE devices, we have numerous POE on webpowerbar where LAN IS PROTECTED WITH APC. As a metter of facts most if not all of our webpowerbars are protected with APC device.
pico
· March 25, 2016
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If you mount the surge protector on a wall near an electrical outlet, you can loosen the screw that holds the electrical outlet in place, slide the spade connector of the ground wire around the screw, and then tighten the screw.
FortLuptonDiver
· April 17, 2021
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I would NOT recommend the snuggly fitting ground plug. Loose connections generate heat. Ideally, this connector on the end of the green wire should be connected to the ground screw inside the metal electrical box that the wall outlet screws into. This green wire carries any damaging voltage/current to Ground when co… see more I would NOT recommend the snuggly fitting ground plug. Loose connections generate heat. Ideally, this connector on the end of the green wire should be connected to the ground screw inside the metal electrical box that the wall outlet screws into. This green wire carries any damaging voltage/current to Ground when connected properly. It is important that there is a solid connection and that it is as close to the grounding framework as possible. IN THEORY...AND IIF the electrical box is actually metal and it is properly grounded, then you can use the little screw that holds the outlet cover in place. If you plan to use this screw, please verify the outlet is being attached to a metal electrical box that is properly grounded. It will usually have a bare copper wire connected inside the box. Now that you are inside the box verifying you can use the little screw that holds the cover plate on, why not go ahead and connect the wire to the grounding location inside the box and let the wire exit from under the wall plate. This is always a better ground, if it is not a plastic electrical box like you see in some new construction. I hope you find this information useful. see less I would NOT recommend the snuggly fitting ground plug. Loose connections generate heat. Ideally, this connector on the end of the green wire should be connected to the ground screw inside the metal electrical box that the wall outlet screws into. This green wire carries any damaging voltage/current to Ground when connected properly. It is important that there is a solid connection and that it is as close to the grounding framework as possible. IN THEORY...AND IIF the electrical box is actually metal and it is properly grounded, then you can use the little screw that holds the outlet cover in place. If you plan to use this screw, please verify the outlet is being attached to a metal electrical box that is properly grounded. It will usually have a bare copper wire connected inside the box. Now that you are inside the box verifying you can use the little screw that holds the cover plate on, why not go ahead and connect the wire to the grounding location inside the box and let the wire exit from under the wall plate. This is always a better ground, if it is not a plastic electrical box like you see in some new construction. I hope you find this information useful.
Rex Roper
· April 8, 2018
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Yes, there is an indication on the unit showing which way to connect.
Rex Roper
· June 10, 2017
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Can they be used with shielded cables and their shielded connectors (?) is a better question and the answer would be yes. Shielded connections are grounded only at a patch panel that supports grounded Ethernet cables. The patch panel is grounded to a Telecommunications Grounding Busbar which itself is grounded to th… see more Can they be used with shielded cables and their shielded connectors (?) is a better question and the answer would be yes. Shielded connections are grounded only at a patch panel that supports grounded Ethernet cables. The patch panel is grounded to a Telecommunications Grounding Busbar which itself is grounded to the building ground typically located at the electrical service entrance. This is a separate ground wire, usually 6 AWG depending on the length of the run, and only thing that is common with the building electrical grounds, is that they are both grounded (bonded) only at the electrical service entrance. This is impractical and unneeded in almost all residential applications. Since the Ethernet cables are only grounded at one end (to prevent ground loops), it is important that the male RJ45 connectors at the grounded patch panel support a shield ground connection. Typical consumer grade patch panels do not have a grounded shield connection. Not all RJ45 connectors support a grounded shield connection. see less Can they be used with shielded cables and their shielded connectors (?) is a better question and the answer would be yes. Shielded connections are grounded only at a patch panel that supports grounded Ethernet cables. The patch panel is grounded to a Telecommunications Grounding Busbar which itself is grounded to the building ground typically located at the electrical service entrance. This is a separate ground wire, usually 6 AWG depending on the length of the run, and only thing that is common with the building electrical grounds, is that they are both grounded (bonded) only at the electrical service entrance. This is impractical and unneeded in almost all residential applications. Since the Ethernet cables are only grounded at one end (to prevent ground loops), it is important that the male RJ45 connectors at the grounded patch panel support a shield ground connection. Typical consumer grade patch panels do not have a grounded shield connection. Not all RJ45 connectors support a grounded shield connection.
Pete Moss
· May 8, 2018