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Showing 1-8 of 8 questions
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Answer:
There's about 300 pieces in each 41 oz bag.
Elizabeth Dodd
· July 11, 2018
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When I ordered them in October 2017, i received two forty-one ounce bags in one box as part of one order. :)
Gene D.
· March 7, 2019
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Yes they are individually wrapped and also very fresh
John Creasman
· July 27, 2017
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Yes...you receive 2 bags, i repeat, 2 bags that are 41 oz. each....Approximately 9" tall, 4-5" deep and at least 5" across.
That would be 11.50 per bag. It is a lot of mints. I used to take them to work and put in a bowl for clients. It lasted a good while.
Check at your local office supply business, you might get … see more
Yes...you receive 2 bags, i repeat, 2 bags that are 41 oz. each....Approximately 9" tall, 4-5" deep and at least 5" across.
That would be 11.50 per bag. It is a lot of mints. I used to take them to work and put in a bowl for clients. It lasted a good while.
Check at your local office supply business, you might get a deal you like better. see less
Yes...you receive 2 bags, i repeat, 2 bags that are 41 oz. each....Approximately 9" tall, 4-5" deep and at least 5" across.
That would be 11.50 per bag. It is a lot of mints. I used to take them to work and put in a bowl for clients. It lasted a good while.
Check at your local office supply business, you might get a deal you like better.

AJ
· November 7, 2017
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No different. Amazon sells the individual bags for $6.98 right now.. Why anyone would pay this much for two bags is beyond me.
TH_Paul
· July 27, 2019
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Answer:
Loredana, you piqued my interest with such an interesting question. So, I did some quick research. Based on what I can find, Pep O Mint®, Spear O Mint® and Wint O Mint® Life Savers are considered "treif." Now, the information I found covers two concepts, which seem to be of importance to posters asking your similar qu… see more Loredana, you piqued my interest with such an interesting question. So, I did some quick research. Based on what I can find, Pep O Mint®, Spear O Mint® and Wint O Mint® Life Savers are considered "treif." Now, the information I found covers two concepts, which seem to be of importance to posters asking your similar question. A) The process does not appear to be overseen by a rabbi; and, b) seemingly equally important, is that they contain animal-derived stearic acid (an ingredient "torn" from animals, if you will). FWIW, I looked at the ingredients on the back of the bag (I still had it as I just purchased two bags, with one left unopened) and, indeed, stearic acid is listed as the last ingredient. A quick check of the Wrigley's website (and related FAQ) noted the following: "While the products we currently sell in the U.S. are not certified kosher, we take great strides to ensure products are kosher and kosher certified in those geographies with more widespread dietary restrictions. For example, all Wrigley products in Israel are certified kosher." Please understand, I'm not Jewish and never looked into this before. Like I said, you piqued my interest. Please perform your own research to see whether your findings match mine -- based on a quick web search "life savers kosher" and the Wrigley's website. I hope this helps. see less Loredana, you piqued my interest with such an interesting question. So, I did some quick research. Based on what I can find, Pep O Mint®, Spear O Mint® and Wint O Mint® Life Savers are considered "treif." Now, the information I found covers two concepts, which seem to be of importance to posters asking your similar question. A) The process does not appear to be overseen by a rabbi; and, b) seemingly equally important, is that they contain animal-derived stearic acid (an ingredient "torn" from animals, if you will). FWIW, I looked at the ingredients on the back of the bag (I still had it as I just purchased two bags, with one left unopened) and, indeed, stearic acid is listed as the last ingredient. A quick check of the Wrigley's website (and related FAQ) noted the following: "While the products we currently sell in the U.S. are not certified kosher, we take great strides to ensure products are kosher and kosher certified in those geographies with more widespread dietary restrictions. For example, all Wrigley products in Israel are certified kosher." Please understand, I'm not Jewish and never looked into this before. Like I said, you piqued my interest. Please perform your own research to see whether your findings match mine -- based on a quick web search "life savers kosher" and the Wrigley's website. I hope this helps.
Gene D.
· August 9, 2017