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Showing 31-40 of 124 questions
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Answer:
yes
AL
· May 11, 2020
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The cranking amps are whatever the vehicle your trying to jump start requires but if what your asking is what kind of amps these cables can handle it’s almost not even an issue I’ve used these 4 gauge cables to jump large Diesel engines including a friends 1984 Peterbuilt semi, the clamps are beefy enough to get a gri… see more The cranking amps are whatever the vehicle your trying to jump start requires but if what your asking is what kind of amps these cables can handle it’s almost not even an issue I’ve used these 4 gauge cables to jump large Diesel engines including a friends 1984 Peterbuilt semi, the clamps are beefy enough to get a grip on large terminals and have a high quality feel to them as in springs don’t seem to lose tension as I’ve used them and feel like they’ll last a relatively long time (in comparison to cables I’ve used in the past) and I’ve yet to notice cables heating up in use in short I’ve nothing but good to say about these I even ordered a second pair for the family car see less The cranking amps are whatever the vehicle your trying to jump start requires but if what your asking is what kind of amps these cables can handle it’s almost not even an issue I’ve used these 4 gauge cables to jump large Diesel engines including a friends 1984 Peterbuilt semi, the clamps are beefy enough to get a grip on large terminals and have a high quality feel to them as in springs don’t seem to lose tension as I’ve used them and feel like they’ll last a relatively long time (in comparison to cables I’ve used in the past) and I’ve yet to notice cables heating up in use in short I’ve nothing but good to say about these I even ordered a second pair for the family car
adam
· April 19, 2018
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1pair. 1red cable+ 1black cable
Cartman
Seller · March 27, 2017
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UL stands for Underwriters Laboratories, an organization that has been around for more than 100 years. If you visit the UL Web site at www.ul.com, you can find the following description: "UL is a world leader in product safety testing and certification. The UL means that they have been tested and certified 'safe' by t… see more UL stands for Underwriters Laboratories, an organization that has been around for more than 100 years. If you visit the UL Web site at www.ul.com, you can find the following description: "UL is a world leader in product safety testing and certification. The UL means that they have been tested and certified 'safe' by their laboratories. see less UL stands for Underwriters Laboratories, an organization that has been around for more than 100 years. If you visit the UL Web site at www.ul.com, you can find the following description: "UL is a world leader in product safety testing and certification. The UL means that they have been tested and certified 'safe' by their laboratories.
D. Fertenbaugh
· February 17, 2020
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yes they are UL tested like the 4 gauge are .my only answer to the 2nd part of your question , not being an electrician .Since most jumper are 6,8.or 10 gauge wire , these should be more then adequate and safe .
joseph miller
· February 11, 2016
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Yes any12volt
Randolph Rolfe
· February 27, 2018
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I have not had to do this but they appear to, yes.
A. Hopkins
· June 2, 2020
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wire: 7mm
PVC: 12.5mm

Cartman
Seller · August 20, 2018
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It's copper coated aluminium (CCA), but its capacity is same as 2AWG copper wire, and its diameter is bigger than 2AWG copper wire.
Cartman
Seller · July 15, 2015
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With jumper cables, don't be consumed about copper vs copper clad. A few posters are obsessed over it for no reason. Copper Clad is fine for occasional use items such as jumper cables - you're not arc welding and don't need pure copper. The difference in cost is usually 50% or more. We all know copper conducts better I… see more With jumper cables, don't be consumed about copper vs copper clad. A few posters are obsessed over it for no reason. Copper Clad is fine for occasional use items such as jumper cables - you're not arc welding and don't need pure copper. The difference in cost is usually 50% or more. We all know copper conducts better IN LIKE FOR LIKE SIZES. If you lean towards a heavier gauge copper clad wire, the difference is negligible. Again, we are talking about jumper cables, not welding cables or a home's electrical wiring (apples and oranges).
To clarify some misinformation, Aluminum wiring that was used in houses for a few years was dangerous for various reasons unrelated to its use in jumper cables. It had to do with the different expansion rates between aluminum and steel used in older switches and receptacles, the failure to use an anti-oxidant paste on connections and the fact that electrical current was constant and/or cycled frequently through the wire which made the aluminum brittle over time. For the record, Aluminum wire in power transmission and distribution applications is still the preferred material today. The wire feeding your home from the street and overhead power transmission lines are still run in aluminum. Sometimes too little knowledge is dangerous because it leads to incorrect conclusions. see less
With jumper cables, don't be consumed about copper vs copper clad. A few posters are obsessed over it for no reason. Copper Clad is fine for occasional use items such as jumper cables - you're not arc welding and don't need pure copper. The difference in cost is usually 50% or more. We all know copper conducts better IN LIKE FOR LIKE SIZES. If you lean towards a heavier gauge copper clad wire, the difference is negligible. Again, we are talking about jumper cables, not welding cables or a home's electrical wiring (apples and oranges).
To clarify some misinformation, Aluminum wiring that was used in houses for a few years was dangerous for various reasons unrelated to its use in jumper cables. It had to do with the different expansion rates between aluminum and steel used in older switches and receptacles, the failure to use an anti-oxidant paste on connections and the fact that electrical current was constant and/or cycled frequently through the wire which made the aluminum brittle over time. For the record, Aluminum wire in power transmission and distribution applications is still the preferred material today. The wire feeding your home from the street and overhead power transmission lines are still run in aluminum. Sometimes too little knowledge is dangerous because it leads to incorrect conclusions.

Paul C
· January 3, 2020