Customer Questions & Answers

Find answers in product info, Q&As, reviews

There was a problem completing your request. Please try your search again later.
All Product Information Customer Q&A's Customer Reviews

Your question may be answered by sellers, manufacturers, or customers who purchased this item, who are all part of the Amazon community.

Please make sure that you are posting in the form of a question.

Please enter a question.

Showing 1-10 of 1000+ questions
Sort by
  • 168
    vote

    votes
Answer:
The latest "usable" standard is 2.1, and this product is most definitely NOT that. This is 2.0, and I actually purchased this needing a 2.1 feature; This cable does not work for that feature. Beware, as we are in a transition from 2.0 to 2.1 right now. Products are releasing 2.1 features, and 2.1 requires a significant… see more The latest "usable" standard is 2.1, and this product is most definitely NOT that. This is 2.0, and I actually purchased this needing a 2.1 feature; This cable does not work for that feature. Beware, as we are in a transition from 2.0 to 2.1 right now. Products are releasing 2.1 features, and 2.1 requires a significant raise in cable bandwidth over 2.0. "Latest Standard" is not true at all here. 2.0 (a and b) is the standard for 90% or the market right now. However, there is the other 10% which is the actual latest standard (2.1). The 2.1 (labeled as such) cables are rare right now, the main difference that I know of is the bandwidth. You can search for a 48Gbps cable as opposed to this one being 18Gbps and find them. If you are looking for future-proof, this is not it right now but the 48Gbps would be much closer. Also, if you are meaning HDCP 2.2, then yes. HDCP 2.2 is the copy protection used with 4K video and is more a hardware chip in the HDMI port; 2.0 cables work just fine with that. see less The latest "usable" standard is 2.1, and this product is most definitely NOT that. This is 2.0, and I actually purchased this needing a 2.1 feature; This cable does not work for that feature. Beware, as we are in a transition from 2.0 to 2.1 right now. Products are releasing 2.1 features, and 2.1 requires a significant raise in cable bandwidth over 2.0. "Latest Standard" is not true at all here. 2.0 (a and b) is the standard for 90% or the market right now. However, there is the other 10% which is the actual latest standard (2.1). The 2.1 (labeled as such) cables are rare right now, the main difference that I know of is the bandwidth. You can search for a 48Gbps cable as opposed to this one being 18Gbps and find them. If you are looking for future-proof, this is not it right now but the 48Gbps would be much closer. Also, if you are meaning HDCP 2.2, then yes. HDCP 2.2 is the copy protection used with 4K video and is more a hardware chip in the HDMI port; 2.0 cables work just fine with that.
JR
· October 19, 2018
  • 34
    vote

    votes
Answer:
I have an older Samsung 55" TV, witch doesn't have the Amazon Prime video app.. I was told by Amazon tech the the HDMI setup will work.
I have a HP laptop and will just move it near the TV(10ft. cable from Amazon).Hope it works, I want to see Jack Ryan. Must remember to change the source to the HDMI port. Thanks Jim 0… see more
I have an older Samsung 55" TV, witch doesn't have the Amazon Prime video app.. I was told by Amazon tech the the HDMI setup will work.
I have a HP laptop and will just move it near the TV(10ft. cable from Amazon).Hope it works, I want to see Jack Ryan. Must remember to change the source to the HDMI port. Thanks Jim 01/04/2016 see less
I have an older Samsung 55" TV, witch doesn't have the Amazon Prime video app.. I was told by Amazon tech the the HDMI setup will work.
I have a HP laptop and will just move it near the TV(10ft. cable from Amazon).Hope it works, I want to see Jack Ryan. Must remember to change the source to the HDMI port. Thanks Jim 01/04/2016

Richard W.
· September 14, 2018
  • 20
    vote

    votes
Answer:
I don't believe these cables are CL3 rated even though the description states they are. There are no markings on the cable that indicate they are CL3 rated. All other in-wall cables I have seen have a marking designating it CL2 or CL3 printed on the cable jacket. These cables look to be CL3 rated, so if that is what… see more I don't believe these cables are CL3 rated even though the description states they are. There are no markings on the cable that indicate they are CL3 rated. All other in-wall cables I have seen have a marking designating it CL2 or CL3 printed on the cable jacket. These cables look to be CL3 rated, so if that is what you need go here: https://www.amazon.com/AmazonBasics-Rated-Wall-Installation-Cable/dp/B014I8TOTC/ref=hpb_a2a_sims_1?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=B014I8TOTC&pd_rd_r=4375f1a0-0b9b-11e9-bb30-a57c4b187e24&pd_rd_w=WschU&pd_rd_wg=Pdel9&pf_rd_p=c34b5440-6acb-4be1-b4dd-0c8656bbc491&pf_rd_r=ADCFVYMEVGYYQHEQMRKG&psc=1&refRID=ADCFVYMEVGYYQHEQMRKG see less I don't believe these cables are CL3 rated even though the description states they are. There are no markings on the cable that indicate they are CL3 rated. All other in-wall cables I have seen have a marking designating it CL2 or CL3 printed on the cable jacket. These cables look to be CL3 rated, so if that is what you need go here: https://www.amazon.com/AmazonBasics-Rated-Wall-Installation-Cable/dp/B014I8TOTC/ref=hpb_a2a_sims_1?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=B014I8TOTC&pd_rd_r=4375f1a0-0b9b-11e9-bb30-a57c4b187e24&pd_rd_w=WschU&pd_rd_wg=Pdel9&pf_rd_p=c34b5440-6acb-4be1-b4dd-0c8656bbc491&pf_rd_r=ADCFVYMEVGYYQHEQMRKG&psc=1&refRID=ADCFVYMEVGYYQHEQMRKG
PabloPicassowasan
· December 29, 2018
  • 17
    vote

    votes
Answer:
every single HDMI cable on the planet will fit in the HDMI slot on your video card. A HDMI cable (whether 1.4, 2.0, 2.0a, etc.) has the exact same connector, hence, it is a HDMI cable. Just like any other cable (display port, rj45, vga, dvi, etc.) will fit in it's coordinating input. What you should be concerned wit… see more every single HDMI cable on the planet will fit in the HDMI slot on your video card. A HDMI cable (whether 1.4, 2.0, 2.0a, etc.) has the exact same connector, hence, it is a HDMI cable. Just like any other cable (display port, rj45, vga, dvi, etc.) will fit in it's coordinating input. What you should be concerned with is not whether it "fits", but whether the cable is compliant with the HDMI 2.0 or HDMI 2.0a specs (such has being hdcp 2.2 compliant). Good luck! see less every single HDMI cable on the planet will fit in the HDMI slot on your video card. A HDMI cable (whether 1.4, 2.0, 2.0a, etc.) has the exact same connector, hence, it is a HDMI cable. Just like any other cable (display port, rj45, vga, dvi, etc.) will fit in it's coordinating input. What you should be concerned with is not whether it "fits", but whether the cable is compliant with the HDMI 2.0 or HDMI 2.0a specs (such has being hdcp 2.2 compliant). Good luck!
Just Another Consumer
· November 28, 2016
  • 4
    vote

    votes
Answer:
No.. I bought these cables to hook my Lg55uh8500 4k HDR tv to my Ps4 Pro that I just received and while it will display the picture cuts in and out constantly does not have the bandwidth needed in my set-up, the little cable that came with the ps4 pro works flawless.
Matthew Bush
· November 10, 2016
  • 4
    vote

    votes
Question:
Answer:
Yes. HDMI 2.0, which is the most current standard. Read on, as I hope this helps.
The following info is fairly comprehensive and can be found at:
http://www.cnet.com/news/hdmi-2-0-what-you-need-to-know/… see more
Yes. HDMI 2.0, which is the most current standard. Read on, as I hope this helps.
The following info is fairly comprehensive and can be found at:
http://www.cnet.com/news/hdmi-2-0-what-you-need-to-know/
The until-now most recent version of the HDMI specification was version 1.4. It specified a number of things, like 4,096x2,160-pixel resolution up to 24 frames per second, or 3,820x2,160 up to 30fps. If you've bought any gear with an HDMI connector in the past few years, it's probably version 1.4. It carried over all the features and support from previous versions, plus added 3D, Audio Return Channel, and so on.
2.0 for 4K
With the TV industry moving inexorably toward Ultra HD "4K," it was clear there needed to be more bandwidth in the connection to handle the future's higher resolutions and frame rates. On that front, HDMI 2.0 delivers, supporting "4K" (2160p by the Forum's explanation) up to 60fps. This allows for full-resolution 4K 3D, along with higher-frame-rate 2D content, like (potentially) home videos and computer games (PC, not PS4/Xbox One). Since almost all movies are shot at 24fps, this increase is less important for feature films or scripted TV shows.
All about the bandwidth
The most important thing to understand about HDMI 2.0 is the increase of the size of the "pipe" transmitting data from the source (like a future native 4K Blu-ray player or PC) to display. This makes possible the increased frame rates at high resolutions. It also allows even more interesting lower-resolution images. For example, HDMI 2.0 supports dual video streams, so you can get two full HD shows on the same screen at the same time. Seem weird? Well, Samsung and LG already have versions of this either in current or future displays, like MultiView on Samsung's KN55S9C OLED TV. So you can watch "Dancing with the Stars" reruns on Netflix while your spouse frags noobs in "Call of Duty 9."
There's also support for a 21:9 aspect ratio (basically 2.35:1), which is interesting, but not of much practical value yet. There are only a handful of native 21:9 displays (a few TVs like the discontinued Vizio CinemaWide, and some high-end projectors). Yes, many BD movies are 2.35:1, but these are really just 2.35 in a 1.78:1 window. see less
Yes. HDMI 2.0, which is the most current standard. Read on, as I hope this helps.
The following info is fairly comprehensive and can be found at:
http://www.cnet.com/news/hdmi-2-0-what-you-need-to-know/
The until-now most recent version of the HDMI specification was version 1.4. It specified a number of things, like 4,096x2,160-pixel resolution up to 24 frames per second, or 3,820x2,160 up to 30fps. If you've bought any gear with an HDMI connector in the past few years, it's probably version 1.4. It carried over all the features and support from previous versions, plus added 3D, Audio Return Channel, and so on.
2.0 for 4K
With the TV industry moving inexorably toward Ultra HD "4K," it was clear there needed to be more bandwidth in the connection to handle the future's higher resolutions and frame rates. On that front, HDMI 2.0 delivers, supporting "4K" (2160p by the Forum's explanation) up to 60fps. This allows for full-resolution 4K 3D, along with higher-frame-rate 2D content, like (potentially) home videos and computer games (PC, not PS4/Xbox One). Since almost all movies are shot at 24fps, this increase is less important for feature films or scripted TV shows.
All about the bandwidth
The most important thing to understand about HDMI 2.0 is the increase of the size of the "pipe" transmitting data from the source (like a future native 4K Blu-ray player or PC) to display. This makes possible the increased frame rates at high resolutions. It also allows even more interesting lower-resolution images. For example, HDMI 2.0 supports dual video streams, so you can get two full HD shows on the same screen at the same time. Seem weird? Well, Samsung and LG already have versions of this either in current or future displays, like MultiView on Samsung's KN55S9C OLED TV. So you can watch "Dancing with the Stars" reruns on Netflix while your spouse frags noobs in "Call of Duty 9."
There's also support for a 21:9 aspect ratio (basically 2.35:1), which is interesting, but not of much practical value yet. There are only a handful of native 21:9 displays (a few TVs like the discontinued Vizio CinemaWide, and some high-end projectors). Yes, many BD movies are 2.35:1, but these are really just 2.35 in a 1.78:1 window.

SteveO
· June 25, 2016
  • 3
    vote

    votes
Answer:
Ordered on June 16, 2019 - Building inspector indicated that the exterior of the cable is not marked and will have to be replaced. It will depended on how picky your inspector is and if they will allow the use of the cable or not behind the wall but better not raise any eye brows and get a cable that is marked accordingly.
Jame
· May 2, 2020
  • 2
    vote

    votes
Answer:
If your Mac has a hdmi slot in it then it will if your Mac does not have a hdmi slot you will need to get a adapter
Tim Smith
· May 24, 2016
  • 2
    vote

    votes
Answer:
"bandwidth up to 18 Gbps, offers 4K@50/60 (2160p) video resolution (four times more clarity than 1080p/60), and supports the wide-angle theatrical 21:9 video aspect ratio"
While it does not state "2.0" on the page, those specs alone qualify it to be a "2.0" cable. Differen't manufacturers call cables differently. Some… see more
"bandwidth up to 18 Gbps, offers 4K@50/60 (2160p) video resolution (four times more clarity than 1080p/60), and supports the wide-angle theatrical 21:9 video aspect ratio"
While it does not state "2.0" on the page, those specs alone qualify it to be a "2.0" cable. Differen't manufacturers call cables differently. Some will say UHD, some high-speed, some 2.0 .. as long as they meet the 18Gbps and 4K 60hz .. they are 2.0. see less
"bandwidth up to 18 Gbps, offers 4K@50/60 (2160p) video resolution (four times more clarity than 1080p/60), and supports the wide-angle theatrical 21:9 video aspect ratio"
While it does not state "2.0" on the page, those specs alone qualify it to be a "2.0" cable. Differen't manufacturers call cables differently. Some will say UHD, some high-speed, some 2.0 .. as long as they meet the 18Gbps and 4K 60hz .. they are 2.0.

Z. Woodard
· August 7, 2016
  • 2
    vote

    votes
Answer:
Maybe the earlier ones were 5/16" but the one I just got is 3/8" plus. It is a thick cable!
B. Orr
· February 10, 2018