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Showing 1-10 of 38 questions
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Answer:
There are not grow lights but I doubt they're going to kill any plants. My whole house uses our LED bulbs and plants grow just fine.
Great Eagle Lighting Corporati…
Seller · June 19, 2019
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Answer:
Thanks for the question. Good one. LED Bulbs are different than the old incandescent and halogen bulbs. These bulbs radiate heat from the dome. LED Bulbs don't radiate heat but transfer it through the base of the bulb. So yes the base does heat up but consider how hot the old incandescent 100W bulbs get. So it's … see more Thanks for the question. Good one. LED Bulbs are different than the old incandescent and halogen bulbs. These bulbs radiate heat from the dome. LED Bulbs don't radiate heat but transfer it through the base of the bulb. So yes the base does heat up but consider how hot the old incandescent 100W bulbs get. So it's normal what you're seeing. see less Thanks for the question. Good one. LED Bulbs are different than the old incandescent and halogen bulbs. These bulbs radiate heat from the dome. LED Bulbs don't radiate heat but transfer it through the base of the bulb. So yes the base does heat up but consider how hot the old incandescent 100W bulbs get. So it's normal what you're seeing.
Great Eagle Lighting Corporati…
Seller · April 5, 2019
  • 1
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This bulb was tested by Chamberlain garage door openers for compatibility and is recommended by them. Many LED bulbs interfere with the opener and can damage it. This is stated in their manuals.
V Baker
· March 10, 2021
  • 0
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If the base of your ceiling fan bulbs is E26 then these bulbs should work fine. Some ceiling fan light sockets have a candelabra base so these will not work with these bulbs
ddandtbc
· May 26, 2019
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Answer:
These are standard sized A19 light bulbs with E26 base. Also, please make sure your ceiling fan is wired directly to a wall on/off light switch. If your ceiling fan has a remote or has a dimming function, please contact us for assistance.
Great Eagle Lighting Corporati…
Seller · December 2, 2019
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Answer:
It should be fine because it is a 15 Watt, or in this case 100W equivalent. But know it is Daylight wich is bright light.
LED CFL Incandescent
Light bulb projected lifespan 25,000 hours 10,000 hours 1,… see more
It should be fine because it is a 15 Watt, or in this case 100W equivalent. But know it is Daylight wich is bright light.
LED CFL Incandescent
Light bulb projected lifespan 25,000 hours 10,000 hours 1,200 hours
Watts per bulb (equiv. 60 watts) 8.5 14 60 see less
It should be fine because it is a 15 Watt, or in this case 100W equivalent. But know it is Daylight wich is bright light.
LED CFL Incandescent
Light bulb projected lifespan 25,000 hours 10,000 hours 1,200 hours
Watts per bulb (equiv. 60 watts) 8.5 14 60

G. Waters
· January 7, 2020
  • 0
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Answer:
I replaced a 3rd party 100W equivalent LED bulb that was causing interference with the 4000K Great Eagle 100W equivalent bulb and it solved the interference problem, Chamberlain lists the 6a191527a, which is also a 100W equivalent bulb, but with a more amber/yellow 2700K color temperature, but I took a chance on the 40… see more I replaced a 3rd party 100W equivalent LED bulb that was causing interference with the 4000K Great Eagle 100W equivalent bulb and it solved the interference problem, Chamberlain lists the 6a191527a, which is also a 100W equivalent bulb, but with a more amber/yellow 2700K color temperature, but I took a chance on the 4000K bulbs which isn't listed and it worked. I imagine the 5000K bulb would also work.

Note the different color temperatures are not brighter, its a measure of the "color", see this link: http://www.westinghouselighting.com/color-temperature.aspx see less
I replaced a 3rd party 100W equivalent LED bulb that was causing interference with the 4000K Great Eagle 100W equivalent bulb and it solved the interference problem, Chamberlain lists the 6a191527a, which is also a 100W equivalent bulb, but with a more amber/yellow 2700K color temperature, but I took a chance on the 4000K bulbs which isn't listed and it worked. I imagine the 5000K bulb would also work.

Note the different color temperatures are not brighter, its a measure of the "color", see this link: http://www.westinghouselighting.com/color-temperature.aspx

James Earl Shagford
· October 24, 2019
  • 0
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Answer:
Pretty much all high quality LED bulbs under $100 each are made in China.
Great Eagle Lighting Corporati…
Seller · April 14, 2020
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Answer:
The "22.8-year" life is based on an estimated operating time of 3 hours per day, which is one-eighth of a 24-hour day (1/8 means "divide by 8") . So, dividing by 22.8 years by 8, you get 2.85 years of continuous operation.

Whether the estimated 3 hours per day is realistic depends on your application, but if you kn… see more
The "22.8-year" life is based on an estimated operating time of 3 hours per day, which is one-eighth of a 24-hour day (1/8 means "divide by 8") . So, dividing by 22.8 years by 8, you get 2.85 years of continuous operation.

Whether the estimated 3 hours per day is realistic depends on your application, but if you know how much usage you put on the lamp (bulb) one of these would be replacing, you can easily figure how much longer or shorter one of them will last using simple arithmetic.

For example, if you're replacing a lamp that you use for 1 hour per day, that's one-third of 3 hours per day. So, dividing 22.8 by 1/3 (same thing as multiplying by 3), you get 68.4 years of service out of one of these lamps at 1 hour of usage per day.

The claim of energy savings is real, but if you're using one of these to replace a lamp that you only use for a few minutes per day, it might not be cost-effective to use one of these. But the price of LED lamps keeps decreasing as the market for them grows, and economy of scale kicks in on the manufacturing side. They're still pricey compared to incandescent, but eventually that will change as the price of LEDs keeps dropping.

Anyhow, these LED bulbs are already cost-effective in applications where they operate for many hours per day, especially if you use them in an air-conditioned space. The heat output of incandescent lamps is one of the reasons they're so inefficient, and a 100W incandescent lamp gets hot enough to give you a second degree burn. Heat-wise, LEDs are a clear winner. see less
The "22.8-year" life is based on an estimated operating time of 3 hours per day, which is one-eighth of a 24-hour day (1/8 means "divide by 8") . So, dividing by 22.8 years by 8, you get 2.85 years of continuous operation.

Whether the estimated 3 hours per day is realistic depends on your application, but if you know how much usage you put on the lamp (bulb) one of these would be replacing, you can easily figure how much longer or shorter one of them will last using simple arithmetic.

For example, if you're replacing a lamp that you use for 1 hour per day, that's one-third of 3 hours per day. So, dividing 22.8 by 1/3 (same thing as multiplying by 3), you get 68.4 years of service out of one of these lamps at 1 hour of usage per day.

The claim of energy savings is real, but if you're using one of these to replace a lamp that you only use for a few minutes per day, it might not be cost-effective to use one of these. But the price of LED lamps keeps decreasing as the market for them grows, and economy of scale kicks in on the manufacturing side. They're still pricey compared to incandescent, but eventually that will change as the price of LEDs keeps dropping.

Anyhow, these LED bulbs are already cost-effective in applications where they operate for many hours per day, especially if you use them in an air-conditioned space. The heat output of incandescent lamps is one of the reasons they're so inefficient, and a 100W incandescent lamp gets hot enough to give you a second degree burn. Heat-wise, LEDs are a clear winner.

Fezno Mint
· December 10, 2019