Customer Review

Reviewed in the United States on January 24, 2021
For all the reviews saying the size isn't right (and thinking that means the cards are fake) you are not reading the description and you don't understand how hard drives, SSDs, flash drives, or memory cards are sold. This is an industry standard. Your computer reads things in multiples of 1,024... so 1,024 bytes is a KB, 1,024 KB is a MB... 1,204 MB is a GB, etc... But all drives are sold in multiples of 1,000. So if you buy a 512GB card, and do the math... device makers are saying that card is 512,000,000,000 bytes. But divide that by 1,024 and your operating system will see it as 476.84GB. Beyond that, you also lose a small percentage for the "file system" index on the drive. So you may see a few GB less even. In my case, I have a 256GB card, which shows up as 238GB, which is exactly as expected. The description on this listing explains this with the text:
1MB=1,000,000 bytes. 1GB=1,000,000,000 bytes. 1TB=1,000,000,000,000 bytes. Actual user storage less.

That explained, I tested my card's speed to see if it hits the 120MB/s ideal... not really. But marketing hype being what it is, I'm sure the "Speed up to 120/MB/s**" is in perfectly ideal conditions with specific readers and file sizes and the like... so my test of 93MB/s on a 10 year old USB 3 card reader with the SD adapter is acceptable to me. I think this should work fine on a soon to arrive Nintendo Switch for the kids. I'll update this review if any surprises come up that should be noted.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Not fake, Size is as expected (read this for explanation)
Reviewed in the United States on January 24, 2021
For all the reviews saying the size isn't right (and thinking that means the cards are fake) you are not reading the description and you don't understand how hard drives, SSDs, flash drives, or memory cards are sold. This is an industry standard. Your computer reads things in multiples of 1,024... so 1,024 bytes is a KB, 1,024 KB is a MB... 1,204 MB is a GB, etc... But all drives are sold in multiples of 1,000. So if you buy a 512GB card, and do the math... device makers are saying that card is 512,000,000,000 bytes. But divide that by 1,024 and your operating system will see it as 476.84GB. Beyond that, you also lose a small percentage for the "file system" index on the drive. So you may see a few GB less even. In my case, I have a 256GB card, which shows up as 238GB, which is exactly as expected. The description on this listing explains this with the text:
1MB=1,000,000 bytes. 1GB=1,000,000,000 bytes. 1TB=1,000,000,000,000 bytes. Actual user storage less.

That explained, I tested my card's speed to see if it hits the 120MB/s ideal... not really. But marketing hype being what it is, I'm sure the "Speed up to 120/MB/s**" is in perfectly ideal conditions with specific readers and file sizes and the like... so my test of 93MB/s on a 10 year old USB 3 card reader with the SD adapter is acceptable to me. I think this should work fine on a soon to arrive Nintendo Switch for the kids. I'll update this review if any surprises come up that should be noted.
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